Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Cummins of the Month Challenge!
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I've been looking for a Dodge truck as a winter vehicle, and as you all know truck prices have severely increased. I have been looking for a 1500 with around 110k miles for about $14k, but no luck finding one within a 3 hour drive. So I was scrolling through marketplace and saw a 2500 and was wondering if it would be a good winter vehicle? Keep in mind I'm from West Virginia, we have lots of mountains and slick roads. Should I check this truck out or keep looking for a 1500?
Tire Wheel Car Land vehicle Vehicle
Font Number Screenshot Parallel Document
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
IMHO diesels in general and particularly 2nd gens are terrible winter vehicles unless you are towing or need the payload capacity.

They take forever to warm up, steering is creaky and groany, and generally the vehicle feels stiff.

I could never go back to daily driving a diesel truck throughout the winter.

Get a half ton.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input, it really helps. I was giving it the benefits of the doubt, and thought I should be informed on a few things before I tried to buy it
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
Holy crap, $13k for a 24 valve auto regular cab with a flat bed.

I guess the car market has gotten crazier than I realized.
.
.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
The reason for being "not great" on slick roads is the torque the diesel pts out. With a couple hundred pounds on the back of that rig it would be fine as long as you can modulate your right foot. If you can keep looking it's probably best to.

You didn't mention if you need a truck for utilitarian/work purposes or simply because that's what you want. If you don't absolutely need a truck then don't rule and AWD or FWD car or Jeep/SUV for the winter. A 4x4 truck seems great for the winter but I'll actually drive my wife's Jetta with snow tires on it before I drive my Ram when there's snow on the ground. Pick up truck rear ends get really light really fast and traction goes away. Winter weight in the bed can help but also cuts into fuel economy a little.

Oddly enough, $13k for that truck is what's "reasonable" these days. Even before the recent changes in the economy guys were paying this and more for rigs in decent shape. I'm actually a bit surprised the price of that isn't north of $20k with the mods it has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Honestly
The reason for being "not great" on slick roads is the torque the diesel pts out. With a couple hundred pounds on the back of that rig it would be fine as long as you can modulate your right foot. If you can keep looking it's probably best to.

You didn't mention if you need a truck for utilitarian/work purposes or simply because that's what you want. If you don't absolutely need a truck then don't rule and AWD or FWD car or Jeep/SUV for the winter. A 4x4 truck seems great for the winter but I'll actually drive my wife's Jetta with snow tires on it before I drive my Ram when there's snow on the ground. Pick up truck rear ends get really light really fast and traction goes away. Winter weight in the bed can help but also cuts into fuel economy a little.

Oddly enough, $13k for that truck is what's "reasonable" these days. Even before the recent changes in the economy guys were paying this and more for rigs in decent shape. I'm actually a bit surprised the price of that isn't north of $20k with the mods it has.

Agreed.

A FWD car with a great set of winter tires is all you need in the winter.
I've had no issues with either a Camry or Corolla armed with a set of Blizzaks or Hakkapeliittas.
Cheap, reliable, great on gas. Perfect winter commuters.

The best winter vehicle I've ever had was a V8 4Runner on a set of Hakks.
But those vehicles are neither cheap, nor easy to find now, and fuel economy was awful.
I sold mine before prices really started climbing for the 4.7 V8 models.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,308 Posts
Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Vehicle Car


Low end torque is what you want... cummins has a flat power curve for a smooth power delivery...

Ive never had an issue, never really added ballast to the rear, just use 4x4 if theres a hill or any significant accumulation.

Tall skinny tires work best, ATs with lots of siping works good for slush and ice, mud tires work great for deep snow.

A snow plow up front screws you in 2wd because it takes almost all the weight off the rear axle (ballast is a good idea if you dont want to use 4x4)

Also limited slips tend to be scary in the snow because the truck wants to fishtail to find traction... an open dif just spins...

A FWD car is the easiest to drive as long as the snow isnt too deep. The FWD cars go wherever you point them.
 

·
Premium Member
1997 Dodge Ram 2500 SLT 12v EC LB
Joined
·
123 Posts
IMHO diesels in general and particularly 2nd gens are terrible winter vehicles unless you are towing or need the payload capacity.

They take forever to warm up, steering is creaky and groany, and generally the vehicle feels stiff.

I could never go back to daily driving a diesel truck throughout the winter.

Get a half ton.
I’ve never experienced any of that except for the slow warm up. I live in Wyoming and spent a lot of years driving back and forth to North Dakota for work and there is not another vehicle I would trust more than my truck. Side note tho, if it’s not in 4wd it will not move anywhere in the snow.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lins
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top