Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum banner

41 - 60 of 65 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,296 Posts
We're probably 60/40 SRW vs. DRW here. And it's not because "you can't park" a DRW.
Most likely it's for performance in the snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Very interesting thread. For the CC 3500s that are out there what percentage would you say are SRW in your area? In my neck of the woods (central NC), I rarely see SRW 3500s.
Well, here in AZ they nail everything over 10,000 GVW pretty hard. But even with thatI still want my dually. And on that note, I see a lot of AZ tagged 2500’s pulling big 5th wheels Around here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jimmy N.

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,687 Posts
If you can afford it why not the 3500 srw. I have always heard it only matter if your over your rawr or tire ratings which is the big thing the payload is just a number based on weight and gcwr. If you don't go over rawr, tire ratings and gcvw you should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Trucks are far to expensive as it is nowadays. Definitely too expensive to be upgrading in a couple of years. I believe in overkill, I’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. Buy the biggest truck you can afford that covers your needs. Especially if you’re already thinking about going bigger with your trailer. Do it right the first time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,424 Posts
There are commercial reasons for using a 2500 over a 3500, that is why I use a 2500.

I have no CDL, so I can only operate a truck up to 26K GVWR or GCWR, a 2500 has a GVWR of 10K, so I can tow trailers up to 16K GVWR with my truck, this allows me to tow a greater variety of trailers returning a higher profitability.

Were this not a concern, were I towing only my own trailer for recreational use, then I might go to a bigger capacity truck if the trailer I would be wanting to tow would require it.

Having the biggest baddest truck on the block is of ZERO concern to me, only matters that it is comfortably capable of doing the job that I need it to do. My 2500 has served that purpose perfectly adequately for over 5.5 years and 545K miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Most likely it's for performance in the snow.
Never had a problem with snow... hammer down!

911274
911275


and it’s almost that time of year again...

911276


Personally, I prefer the 3500 leaf springs and a higher payload. Neither truck (16’ or 19’) has ever felt like it’s going to shake loose fillings.... except for when I have to drive through Edmonton...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,296 Posts
Never had a problem with snow... hammer down!
You're probably lucky enough to have snow covered roads for a while. We get snow, then it's usually gone in a few days, and before that they've been plowing and salting.
And that repeats itself almost constantly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
This is a typical winter. It will dump heavily like this, then not snow for a few weeks although it will be stupid cold. It will get plowed and pounded into ice for a day or two then the highway will become dry until the wind blows the snow everywhere and the highway becomes covered in ice again.
911288


At several random points throughout winter we will get Chinooks. (Google it yourself) But suffice to say; the temp will jump, within a few hours to a day, from the -20/30C area to +10/15C and everything will melt... people will get migraines, and everybody who has an insured motorcycle will be out dodging gravel and having a time!

911289


Now, before we get too off-topic: If you buy too big of a trailer you’ll be relegated to the RV parks and unable to scrape your way to the fun sites!
911290
 

·
Sasquatch
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
Exactly what @Ltngdrvr said.
There are commercial reasons for using a 2500 over a 3500, that is why I use a 2500.

I have no CDL, so I can only operate a truck up to 26K GVWR or GCWR, a 2500 has a GVWR of 10K, so I can tow trailers up to 16K GVWR with my truck, this allows me to tow a greater variety of trailers returning a higher profitability.

Were this not a concern, were I towing only my own trailer for recreational use, then I might go to a bigger capacity truck if the trailer I would be wanting to tow would require it.

Having the biggest baddest truck on the block is of ZERO concern to me, only matters that it is comfortably capable of doing the job that I need it to do. My 2500 has served that purpose perfectly adequately for over 5.5 years and 545K miles.
^This

State troopers have been cracking down on this here in NC. If your flatbed GVWR + your truck's GVWR is over that 26K, they can write you up if you don't have a license to support it, even if you're only towing an electric go-cart. And this isn't some easy slap on the wrist either and pay a 3-4 digit fine. They also force you to bring a CDL driver out to tow it home.

However, when it comes overloading fines, it doesn't matter what the payload or GVWR is. It's based on your GAWR limits. This is where the Ram 2500 comes in handy with it's low GVWR, it still has a high GAWR. And the GAWR is manufacture rated and isn't only for the axle, but keeps the suspension, tires and brake limitations in mind as well. The axle itself is around 10,000 lbs.

For the 2014 like my truck, I have a 6,000 front, 6,500 rear and 10,000 GVWR. The 2014 3500 SRW typically has a 6,000 front, 7,000 rear and usually a 12,000 GVWR. and the 2014 3500 DRW usually has a 6,000 front, 9,750 rear and 14,000 GVWR. Remember, the GAWR isn't consistent for all the model years, check yours to confirm.

In the real world, the SRW 3500 can probably safely and legally support around 500 lbs of additional weight in the rear. When shopping around for 2500 and 3500 trucks, keep the GAWR in mind, going over the GAWR is not acceptable. And if you need to step up to the 3500, double check your GVWR on your trailer, you might need a CDL if you're towing a non-RV that has a decent GVWR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
Being that we’re old farts we have the 2500 for the comfort and ride. Don’t ever intend to tow or haul anything over our 10k trailer. when we’re not towing it’s still a great ride for a HD truck. If I had any thoughts about going bigger we’d have a 3500 in the driveway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
My 2500 is plated at 48,000 lbs. When I run loads, I can have 34k on trailer axles (combined) and up to 20k legally on drive (not possible since tires and axle wouldn't allow it to be to legal safely.) When I did the math, I can have 34k, plus 8k ra, plus 8k fa, that comes out to 50k. In the best of conditions I'll have 5k on front axle so that is really 47k total, can't get a 47k plate so I went up rather than down so I don't limit my capacity. Only advantage to a dually would be about 7k extra capacity on rear axle, then you run into the axle limits.

I'm commercial use, so the door sticker means nothing when I'm hooked to a trailer. After talking to 3 commercial enforcement officers, they told me I have to follow bridge law when hooked to a trailer while commercial. They only will start digging into things when you "look" heavy. They told me to not go past tire ratings and be sure all lights and brakes operate as intended. Having used my truck to full capacity, they are fully capable of accelerating and stopping the load just fine. To be honest, they accelerate and brake better than a semi at full load. Yes, I was a drop deck/rgn driver and have been grossed over 200k in a tractor trailer so, theoretically that's overweight for the truck, but legal and safe.

Sent from my SM-G970U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
No brainer. Skip the 2500 and straight to the 3500. When I was building my Limited, the upcharge to go from a 2500 to a 3500 was $600. Now I have more capacity and never have to worry about not having enough truck. Just make sure you select the rear air option on either truck you chose. My new 3500 with factory rear air rides better than my out going 2500 with leaf springs. Even my wife said the same thing and lets face it, if it passes the wife test then you're good to go.

R.K.
 

·
Sasquatch
Joined
·
3,670 Posts
No brainer. Skip the 2500 and straight to the 3500. When I was building my Limited, the upcharge to go from a 2500 to a 3500 was $600. Now I have more capacity and never have to worry about not having enough truck. Just make sure you select the rear air option on either truck you chose. My new 3500 with factory rear air rides better than my out going 2500 with leaf springs. Even my wife said the same thing and lets face it, if it passes the wife test then you're good to go.

R.K.
You're right, it's a great deal if you have a CDL or live in an area with zero weight restrictions. Or towing a trailer that doesn't need to follow the weight restriction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
Looking into buying my first Cummins and will be towing a travel trailer or possibly 5th wheel.

I do not want a dually as it'll likely be my daily as well and don't wanna deal with a dually in an urban area.

Here's my question... While a 2500 would likely satisfy my initial towing and payload needs, why not just go for a 1 ton srw? I do not care at all about ride quality, prices are roughly the same, and I could see myself moving up to bigger trailers in the future.

Am i missing any downsides to a 1 ton? Taxes, insurance, anything weird like that??

Thanks all.
depends on where you live. Some states have different registration for 3500's vs 2500s. You end up paying a lot more to register a 3500. Some states there is 0 difference in registration.
The 2500 has coilover rear suspension. The 3500 is leaf springs, so debatable softer ride in the 2500.

Another question... You mentioned trouble prone. I know when problems do happen they aren't cheap, but aren't 4th gen cummins legendarily reliable? Or is that just referencing their ability to go for 500k miles with a good amount of expensive maintenance along the way?
The motor yes reliable........The rest of the truck you might be carrying some of the parts in the bed. The rest of the truck will fall apart around the motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I used to drive a dually 3500, and to be honest after a couple weeks I could park it just as easily as my wife's tahoe and go through any tight, curbed drive-through in town without rubbing tires. But when I decided to go for a 4th gen I decided to look for a 2500 because I'm towing much less these days and I wanted a more offroad capable truck (them back hips like to smack fence posts and trees). I ended up getting a better deal on a 3500 SRW shortbox and I'm pretty glad I did. It rides like locomotive but it pulls like one too, and I'm like 100lbs underneath the cutoff to require DOT numbers in my state - but I've found myself in a couple positions where I needed to throw 2K+ in the back and the stability was impressive. If you can swing it, having more truck than you think you need is a great advantage. Even if your tongue load on the gooseneck is suitable for a 2500, I have no hesitation throwing a generator, air compressor,cinderblocks,and a couple hundred pounds of fuel back there at the same time without getting squirly. The caveat there is I don't daily drive the thing so I can ignore the ride quality :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
I wanted the Aisin tranny (first ever auto for me) and wanted leaf spring rear end. Why oh why did Chrysler put a coil linked rear end in a medium duty truck????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
I daily drive my 3500 dually and have no problems parking, heck my wife drives it sometimes and no problems for either.

Go big or go home.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Electrojake
41 - 60 of 65 Posts
Top