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I love the 342s, I have the simple 2 door, 2500,and putting in my specs into the dodge sight, sais its rated for towing 17,782.66lbs, I cant see myself needing to tow that. The payload said 2,500, but its 3,000 or adding whatever the emissions stuff that fell of gained me payload.
It scaled in at 7,500lbs when stock, with full fuel, def and me and tools.
It tows a simple 3,000 miles a year, then its a car, so I would be plugged solid at my 98,000 miles if I didn't delete.
 

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To the OP, if it were me, I would get the 3500. It's not even a question, but........
A Class 2a (a 2500) has a payload rating based on its GVWR minus its curb weight. Same with a 3500. Or a Class 2 (F-150, 1500, etc) Although things are changing the last year or so. Very confusing. The old rules don't seem to apply so maybe I'm not up to date.
I would say, ''Talk to people who do it' and not listen to the keyboard commandos. Especially me.
My buddy tows a gigantic 5th wheel with his '13 Ram CTD 2500. And it's not small. It's a 42 foot toyhauler that is frequently loaded in the back with about anything he can put in it. Motorcycles, furniture, ATVs.... Whatever.
I think he's nuts. Well, he is nuts. But he's not a poser. In 2019 he towed his 5iver from Coast to Coast and put over 11k on his truck in the process.
But he set his truck up to pull that kind of weight, too. AIrbags, etc. I think the '13 still had springs, so it was probably easier.
One thing is to talk to people however one thing to look at is being legal. There are so many RVs out there that are way out of their weight class. RVs are not always hit for the weigh stations however local PD can sometimes be pulling over everyone in site with a trailer. Sometimes my local PD gets a bug up their @$$ and they pull over any truck pulling something. They check all the major items including total possible weight of the truck and trailer combined to figure out if you are legal. Not sure of overweight fines however I am sure they are not cheap, plus insurance can get nuts to if they find our overweight. Plus if your ever in an accident god bless you if they find your over weight.
Example you can be within the spec of the gcwr but over payload, which still is an issue.

My father in law has a 2017 fully loaded dirtymax 2500, his truck is registered at 10k however over the scale empty his truck weights 8800 or 9k not sure. he went over the cat scale with his camper 35ft and he is over payload by at least a ton and that isnt the camper fully wet down or fully loaded.

When guying a new truck I would highly look at the numbers before figuring out which truck you must have.
 

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One thing is to talk to people however one thing to look at is being legal. <snip>
I keep hearing that. But I have yet to talk to anyone who has ever been cited for towing overweight in a privately owned vehicle for private purposes.

In fact, I owned an insurance agency for 20 years and I've never seen an overweight ticket given to a private owner driving a private truck. Never.

Saw them on Professional Drivers. We ignored them on the MVR,

If anybody should be ticketed for being overweght, it's that Kia I saw on the road a few days ago with four TV Mama's in it that looked like it was ready to blow the tires and bust the axles.

But that's just me. And that's in Florida. One of the last Free States.

I'm still looking for that elusive overweight ticket..... As a private owner doing personal driving.

There's got to be one -- Somewhere.

Here's a thought. Whenever any of you are towing your RV, stop into a weigh station and watch the looks on the peoples' faces there. You'll be lucky if the Trooper doesn't give you a ticket for being a PITA.
 

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All states have different plates for trucks. In Illinois, a common "B" plate is good for up to 8,000lbs for the truck. A "D" plate is good for up to 12,000lbs for the truck.

I have a "D" plate on my truck. My truck comes in a bit over 7,000lbs by it self, not including people & stuff. Add on our 5er, people & stuff I just went over what a "B" plate allows. My hitch weight is 2700-2800 lbs. Having the "D" plate ensures I'm not over on the plate.

@RammerJam is correct on the being pulled over part. We've yet to be weighed by officials. Not to say it won't happen. One thought that does come to mind is if one is involved in a serious accident, weight limits could be looked into. One down side to having a "D" plate in Illinois is yearly inspections. Also have to have triangle reflectors & fire extinguisher on board all the time.

We did things backwards. Did the home work on this truck and on my sold '06 6.0 F-350. We had ordered our 5er and knew what it's weights were empty. Never go by dry weights. While we try to not overload, I'm sure we have been on occasion. Bet many do as well. While not intentional, it just happens.

That fella "Murphy's Law" seems to have set up shop somewhere here at camperman mannor. So that is why I have a "D" plate. Many have 3500 trucks running on "B" plates and have no problems doing so. Peace of mind is why we have the "D" plate.

@RammerJam do those that tow commercially delivering RV's need to stop in weigh stations?
 

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Umm, wouldn't you have an extinguisher anyway?!?

YES...............I was just repeating what a "D" plate requires to have onboard for the truck. Always wise to have a fire extinguisher on hand.
 
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<snip>

@RammerJam do those that tow commercially delivering RV's need to stop in weigh stations?
My (limited) understanding is that if you're driving a Class 2a truck (2500, F-250, etc) -- No.

A 3500, 4500, 5500 -- Yes.

 

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My (limited) understanding is that if you're driving a Calss 2a truck (2500, F-250, etc) -- No.

A 3500, 4500, 5500 -- Yes.

Ltngdrvr will know. He has done it once or twice


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My (limited) understanding is that if you're driving a Calss 2a truck (2500, F-250, etc) -- No.

A 3500, 4500, 5500 -- Yes.
I don't think it matters what you drive. If making money, it's commercial, if commercial, better stop at the scales.
 
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I do not believe that is accurate
Okay, taxis and such obviously don't have to stop.
On the other hand, in CA you have to stop if you remove the pickup bed and install a flatbed.
 

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I dunno. I drove duallys in L.A. quite a bit. Was it as zippy as, say, a Corvette? No, but fully doable.
Had to think, though, which doesn't seem to be a common habit these days.
Unless parking at the shopping mall, the dually is not an issue for me.
 

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I wish i would have gone to the 3500 dually sooner and not had to upgrade after 5th wheel camper purchase. I daily drive my dually and the only thing I don't do is most drive throughs which was not a big deal until Covid.
 

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Well, just to ask a dumb azz question. Does the 2500 and 3500 SRW have the same rear axles?
I come over from a long line of Fords, and some GM’s and this was always pretty much the case, until one got into the duallies. Just in the last couple years now Ford has went to a DANA M275 in their HD tow 250’s and all SRW 350’s. It is quite a bit heftier than the old 10.5” Sterling that was their standby for a lot of years. And I haven’t been around a GM since the days Of the old 14 bolt.
 

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Well, just to ask a dumb azz question. Does the 2500 and 3500 SRW have the same rear axles?
I come over from a long line of Fords, and some GM’s and this was always pretty much the case, until one got into the duallies. Just in the last couple years now Ford has went to a DANA M275 in their HD tow 250’s and all SRW 350’s. It is quite a bit heftier than the old 10.5” Sterling that was their standby for a lot of years. And I haven’t been around a GM since the days Of the old 14 bolt.
Yes and no. It’s a different part number but everything I’ve seen and read confirm it’s the same except the spring mounts. My assumption is that’s why the different part numbers.
2500= coil springs
3500= leaf springs

Weird part is, axles are rated differently amongst different trims. Most 2500 are rated at 6k lbs RAWR, but my Limited Mega Cab model is rated at 6500 lbs RAWR.
3500 SRW are 7k lbs RAWR.


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Yes and no. It’s a different part number but everything I’ve seen and read confirm it’s the same except the spring mounts. My assumption is that’s why the different part numbers.
2500= coil springs
3500= leaf springs

Weird part is, axles are rated differently amongst different trims. Most 2500 are rated at 6k lbs RAWR, but my Limited Mega Cab model is rated at 6500 lbs RAWR.
3500 SRW are 7k lbs RAWR.


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And those are likely just paper ratings. I know in some of the earlier F350 duallies that had the 10.5 Sterling it was rated at 9700 lb, and AFAIK all internal parts were the same. In a 250 it was rated for like 6000
 

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Very interesting thread. For the CC 3500s that are out there what percentage would you say are SRW in your area? In my neck of the woods (central NC), I rarely see SRW 3500s.
 
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