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Looking into buying my first Cummins and will be towing a travel trailer or possibly 5th wheel.

I do not want a dually as it'll likely be my daily as well and don't wanna deal with a dually in an urban area.

Here's my question... While a 2500 would likely satisfy my initial towing and payload needs, why not just go for a 1 ton srw? I do not care at all about ride quality, prices are roughly the same, and I could see myself moving up to bigger trailers in the future.

Am i missing any downsides to a 1 ton? Taxes, insurance, anything weird like that??

Thanks all.
 

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Probably not.
I have a 2500 that I am going to sell to get a 3500 for the same reason. My 2500 has a 1800lbs of payload which is where the issues come in. Most 5th wheels, especially toy haulers will blow your payload with the trailer and truck empty.
But, it really depends on which truck and which trailer. Payload can be over 3k lbs in certain configurations of 2500.

I'm in the same boat as you, I am now shopping for a comparable 3500 and I really don't want a dually. But, at 12,300lbs GWVR of the same truck I have now but in a 3500 will give me roughly 4k lbs of payload. This should be enough with my current trailer, but if we ever upgrade......

Yeah, the registration and tolls are the downfalls. I went through Pa without the trailer, from NJ to Carlisle, Pa cost me like $35 in tolls since I had a class 2 vehicle. This was around $10 more than a class 1.
 

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Were I live 3500 requires inspection every year and licencing is about double compared to a 2500. 2500 is only inspected when ownership is transfered so only once in the life of you owning it. Not sure what it's like in your area.

3500 were I live typically requires commerical insurance as well which is nearly double .

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

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Greetings @G56'er 🍺
I myself am confused why anyone would use one of these trouble-prone, fuel sucking sow's as a daily driver in the first place. However, they are fun to drive and obviously tow like a locomotive, so here's the way I see it...

* I understand that FCA's goal is to make money, Nothing else, just profit, and profit is had by selling trucks. However, in reality why the hell would anyone think that putting a slow, heavy, 409 CID diesel monster in a little truck like a 25 or 3500 SRW makes any sense?
Answer: It doesnt.
It helps FCA sell trucks to gear-heads, sure, but practicality? No.
So, (IMHO) as stupid as it is to put that heavy Cummins in a SRW 3500, it's only worse in a payload starved 2500.

* The payload in my own 3500 Longhorn is an anemic 3705 pounds. I carry a small truck-camper and I'm way over my GVWR. Since a light-duty vehicle like a SRW pickup itself is incapable of hauling any substantial load, then why would I need that payload robbing HO-Cumming & AISIN trans? The truck itself cant haul anything big so why the monster Power-train? None of it makes any sense in a SRW truck.🙄
In a 4500, 5500, or a damn school bus it makes perfect sense to run a 6.7L Cummins, but not in a little SRW pickup.

* Cost?
My SRW 3500 is registered in NJ at 12,300 Lb. Registration and full coverage insurance is cheap compared to what it costs to feed this 8500 Lb land-barge fuel, maintenance, & repairs.

* If you want to save ten grand on the purchase price, have a little extra payload, (and way less aggravation), get a 3500 with a gas engine.

* If you plan on towing or hauling anything heavier than a couple bags of groceries, I'd think seriously about getting a dually.

Now the positive side. . .
* If you want a great "hobby truck" get a Ram 2500/Cummins in a low trim package and then spend the rest of your days modding it. There are thousands of cool parts & upgrades available and they ride pretty darn good too.(y)
These trucks are fun to drive and if you like to swing a wrench you'll be delighted! There is honestly no limit to how radical of a truck you could build.

Closing thought before you spend any money...
* A daily driver and a heavy hauler are two completely different entity's. I learned that the hard way after spending $70,000 on a new 3500 and then a couple months later admitting defeat and dumping another thirty grand on a new Toyota Rav4 for daily driving & grocery getting.

My little rice-burner does everything better than the Ram except for the few times a year I need to move my camper.
YRMV

Have fun & keep us posted!
-Ej- 🥂
 

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I'll follow that with YES the 3500 srw 6.7 Cummins is a good choice for hauling a trailer/rv. My mega cab has 3900 payload and I tow about 16.5k lb toyhauler on average one weekend a month. Its also my daily driver. Is what it is, I like the truck
 

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Greetings @G56'er 🍺
I myself am confused why anyone would use one of these trouble-prone, fuel sucking sow's as a daily driver in the first place. However, they are fun to drive and obviously tow like a locomotive, so here's the way I see it...

* I understand that FCA's goal is to make money, Nothing else, just profit, and profit is had by selling trucks. However, in reality why the hell would anyone think that putting a slow, heavy, 409 CID diesel monster in a little truck like a 25 or 3500 SRW makes any sense?
Answer: It doesnt.
It helps FCA sell trucks to gear-heads, sure, but practicality? No.
So, (IMHO) as stupid as it is to put that heavy Cummins in a SRW 3500, it's only worse in a payload starved 2500.

* The payload in my own 3500 Longhorn is an anemic 3705 pounds. I carry a small truck-camper and I'm way over my GVWR. Since a light-duty vehicle like a SRW pickup itself is incapable of hauling any substantial load, then why would I need that payload robbing HO-Cumming & AISIN trans? The truck itself cant haul anything big so why the monster Power-train? None of it makes any sense in a SRW truck.🙄
In a 4500, 5500, or a damn school bus it makes perfect sense to run a 6.7L Cummins, but not in a little SRW pickup.

* Cost?
My SRW 3500 is registered in NJ at 12,300 Lb. Registration and full coverage insurance is cheap compared to what it costs to feed this 8500 Lb land-barge fuel, maintenance, & repairs.

* If you want to save ten grand on the purchase price, have a little extra payload, (and way less aggravation), get a 3500 with a gas engine.

* If you plan on towing or hauling anything heavier than a couple bags of groceries, I'd think seriously about getting a dually.

Now the positive side. . .
* If you want a great "hobby truck" get a Ram 2500/Cummins in a low trim package and then spend the rest of your days modding it. There are thousands of cool parts & upgrades available and they ride pretty darn good too.(y)
These trucks are fun to drive and if you like to swing a wrench you'll be delighted! There is honestly no limit to how radical of a truck you could build.

Closing thought before you spend any money...
* A daily driver and a heavy hauler are two completely different entity's. I learned that the hard way after spending $70,000 on a new 3500 and then a couple months later admitting defeat and dumping another thirty grand on a new Toyota Rav4 for daily driving & grocery getting.

My little rice-burner does everything better than the Ram except for the few times a year I need to move my camper.
YRMV

Have fun & keep us posted!
-Ej- 🥂
My friend's '05 Ram qcsb with Goerend billet trans w/triple disc converter and Smarty is a joy to drive compared to my '07 G-56 EFI. It's so nimble,quick and parks at Home Depot no sweat. He gets 16-18 mpg every tank. His wife's car is a low mileage Explorer. He's got maybe $50-$60K in the whole package. Registration,insurance, and cost of ownership is low. To me that's the whole enchilada. We have an '05 Honda Pilot,210K. Purrs like a kitten and shifts perfectly. I'm going to get another '05-'07. I love the safety features of the new 5 seater SUV's but $30K plus to get 50%-60% better mpg is unrealistic.
 

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hydraulic lifter crew
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I did the low optioned t'man 2500. I daily it and use it on the farm. It's a grocery getter and an awesome road tripper. I never tow over 13k or so tops, so what I did worked perfect for my situation. I've added some higher option items to it. mpg is not a concern to me.

if I were the op and planned to tow heavy or had upgrade plans in the future, get the 1 ton. bang the dually if it fits.

I also agree with everything @Electrojake said.
 

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Go Packers
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If it is possible, please consider 4.10 gearing or at least 3.73's. My truck has 4.10 gears. Wouldn't trade them for nothing. As mentioned above, the 3500 truck has more payload. IIRC the spring pack is different too, but don't quote me.

Don't be taken in by those who might say 3.42 gears are fine towing. They are NOT. Many members here that tow have switched from 3.42 gearing to either 4.10 or 3.73.

My 3500 is rated to tow 16,800 & a GCWR of 24,000lbs. The gearing makes all the difference. My truck is a 4x2, so I don't add weight having a 4x4.

Many add on an air suspension kit. I did this. It was to level the truck out while towing. The air suspension adds ZERO for weight towing or hauling. Only levels the truck back out.

Better to have a bit more truck than needed, than wishing you had more truck after the fact.

Best wishes with your decision.
 

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3.42 tow just fine I know because I tow with mine. Im not towing every day.That said, I liked the 4.10 gears my 2006 Chevy had (with 35" tires) and I would prefer them at times.
 

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Looking into buying my first Cummins and will be towing a travel trailer or possibly 5th wheel.

I do not want a dually as it'll likely be my daily as well and don't wanna deal with a dually in an urban area.

Here's my question... While a 2500 would likely satisfy my initial towing and payload needs, why not just go for a 1 ton srw? I do not care at all about ride quality, prices are roughly the same, and I could see myself moving up to bigger trailers in the future.

Am i missing any downsides to a 1 ton? Taxes, insurance, anything weird like that??

Thanks all.
I still like old fashioned leaf springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Greetings @G56'er 🍺
I myself am confused why anyone would use one of these trouble-prone, fuel sucking sow's as a daily driver in the first place. However, they are fun to drive and obviously tow like a locomotive, so here's the way I see it...

* I understand that FCA's goal is to make money, Nothing else, just profit, and profit is had by selling trucks. However, in reality why the hell would anyone think that putting a slow, heavy, 409 CID diesel monster in a little truck like a 25 or 3500 SRW makes any sense?
Answer: It doesnt.
It helps FCA sell trucks to gear-heads, sure, but practicality? No.
So, (IMHO) as stupid as it is to put that heavy Cummins in a SRW 3500, it's only worse in a payload starved 2500.

* The payload in my own 3500 Longhorn is an anemic 3705 pounds. I carry a small truck-camper and I'm way over my GVWR. Since a light-duty vehicle like a SRW pickup itself is incapable of hauling any substantial load, then why would I need that payload robbing HO-Cumming & AISIN trans? The truck itself cant haul anything big so why the monster Power-train? None of it makes any sense in a SRW truck.🙄
In a 4500, 5500, or a damn school bus it makes perfect sense to run a 6.7L Cummins, but not in a little SRW pickup.

* Cost?
My SRW 3500 is registered in NJ at 12,300 Lb. Registration and full coverage insurance is cheap compared to what it costs to feed this 8500 Lb land-barge fuel, maintenance, & repairs.

* If you want to save ten grand on the purchase price, have a little extra payload, (and way less aggravation), get a 3500 with a gas engine.

* If you plan on towing or hauling anything heavier than a couple bags of groceries, I'd think seriously about getting a dually.

Now the positive side. . .
* If you want a great "hobby truck" get a Ram 2500/Cummins in a low trim package and then spend the rest of your days modding it. There are thousands of cool parts & upgrades available and they ride pretty darn good too.(y)
These trucks are fun to drive and if you like to swing a wrench you'll be delighted! There is honestly no limit to how radical of a truck you could build.

Closing thought before you spend any money...
* A daily driver and a heavy hauler are two completely different entity's. I learned that the hard way after spending $70,000 on a new 3500 and then a couple months later admitting defeat and dumping another thirty grand on a new Toyota Rav4 for daily driving & grocery getting.

My little rice-burner does everything better than the Ram except for the few times a year I need to move my camper.
YRMV

Have fun & keep us posted!
-Ej- 🥂
Thanks EJ, great insight here! I definitely should have also mentioned a large reason I want one or the other is a g56 Cummins is just sweet lol. This is coming from a guy who's last 2 dailys were and 05 jeep Rubicon and a 74 bronco before that. I have a son now, so just also trying to find the least practical "family" car possible!

I'm definitely getting a tradesman like you pointed out, and leaning towards the 1 ton seeing as I will tow something heavy from time to time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Greetings @G56'er 🍺
I myself am confused why anyone would use one of these trouble-prone, fuel sucking sow's as a daily driver in the first place. However, they are fun to drive and obviously tow like a locomotive, so here's the way I see it...

* I understand that FCA's goal is to make money, Nothing else, just profit, and profit is had by selling trucks. However, in reality why the hell would anyone think that putting a slow, heavy, 409 CID diesel monster in a little truck like a 25 or 3500 SRW makes any sense?
Answer: It doesnt.
It helps FCA sell trucks to gear-heads, sure, but practicality? No.
So, (IMHO) as stupid as it is to put that heavy Cummins in a SRW 3500, it's only worse in a payload starved 2500.

* The payload in my own 3500 Longhorn is an anemic 3705 pounds. I carry a small truck-camper and I'm way over my GVWR. Since a light-duty vehicle like a SRW pickup itself is incapable of hauling any substantial load, then why would I need that payload robbing HO-Cumming & AISIN trans? The truck itself cant haul anything big so why the monster Power-train? None of it makes any sense in a SRW truck.🙄
In a 4500, 5500, or a damn school bus it makes perfect sense to run a 6.7L Cummins, but not in a little SRW pickup.

* Cost?
My SRW 3500 is registered in NJ at 12,300 Lb. Registration and full coverage insurance is cheap compared to what it costs to feed this 8500 Lb land-barge fuel, maintenance, & repairs.

* If you want to save ten grand on the purchase price, have a little extra payload, (and way less aggravation), get a 3500 with a gas engine.

* If you plan on towing or hauling anything heavier than a couple bags of groceries, I'd think seriously about getting a dually.

Now the positive side. . .
* If you want a great "hobby truck" get a Ram 2500/Cummins in a low trim package and then spend the rest of your days modding it. There are thousands of cool parts & upgrades available and they ride pretty darn good too.(y)
These trucks are fun to drive and if you like to swing a wrench you'll be delighted! There is honestly no limit to how radical of a truck you could build.

Closing thought before you spend any money...
* A daily driver and a heavy hauler are two completely different entity's. I learned that the hard way after spending $70,000 on a new 3500 and then a couple months later admitting defeat and dumping another thirty grand on a new Toyota Rav4 for daily driving & grocery getting.

My little rice-burner does everything better than the Ram except for the few times a year I need to move my camper.
YRMV

Have fun & keep us posted!
-Ej- 🥂
Another question... You mentioned trouble prone. I know when problems do happen they aren't cheap, but aren't 4th gen cummins legendarily reliable? Or is that just referencing their ability to go for 500k miles with a good amount of expensive maintenance along the way?
 

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If your planning to haul a 5er and other trailers a dually is the only way to go IMO. My 06 2500 will haul my 12.5K 5er no problem the issue is payload. Having 35s a leveling kit really made the truck squat. Added air bags and I'm fine however hauling anything more than 12.5 is a pain with the 3.73s. If I were to do it again I dually would be my only option since my current trailer puts me over my payload by at least 1500lb empty. Remember payload is including everything inside the truck so me and the kids and 2 dogs plus the 5er hitch puts my gvw up and up and up. Plus with the fam squad in the truck safety is one of my top priorities which is why I'll get a 3500 DRW truck soon enough.
 

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Dually would be nice if it was a dedicated tow rig but seriously impractical for daily urban driving. I cant afford $70k driveway sculpture. SRW 3500 will handle 17k trailer easily.
 

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Dually would be nice if it was a dedicated tow rig but seriously impractical for daily urban driving.
I dunno. I drove duallys in L.A. quite a bit. Was it as zippy as, say, a Corvette? No, but fully doable.
Had to think, though, which doesn't seem to be a common habit these days.
 

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Another question...
You mentioned trouble prone. I know when problems do happen they aren't cheap, but aren't 4th gen Cummins legendarily reliable?
Well @G56'er You can look at it this way. . .
Compared to the new Gen-5 Rams a Gen-4 is the most trouble-free & reliable vehicle on the planet.

No, seriously, go with a Gen-4. (y)
 

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I grew up trucking and a 18 wheeler was my DD, so a dually P/U is nothing. I've had several duallies and DD them for MANY years was normal, for me. For sure, get the 3500 srw, especially if you've thinking about a fairly big 5er. BTW, my 12 has 3.73 but my other duallies had 4.10s and I'd love to have 4.10s in my 12. Craig
 

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To the OP, if it were me, I would get the 3500. It's not even a question, but........

It was back in the 70's that they came up with the current ratings..... Class 1, Class 2 and 2a, Class3, etc.

Nobody's bothered to update things in the last going-on-fifty-years (a half century) but, trucks have changed. The goobermint has not. They're still as stoopid as they've ever been.

A Class 2a (a 2500) has a payload rating based on its GVWR minus its curb weight. Same with a 3500. Or a Class 2 (F-150, 1500, etc) Although things are changing the last year or so. Very confusing. The old rules don't seem to apply so maybe I'm not up to date.

I would say, ''Talk to people who do it' and not listen to the keyboard commandos. Especially me.

My buddy tows a gigantic 5th wheel with his '13 Ram CTD 2500. And it's not small. It's a 42 foot toyhauler that is frequently loaded in the back with about anything he can put in it. Motorcycles, furniture, ATVs.... Whatever.

I think he's nuts. Well, he is nuts. But he's not a poser. In 2019 he towed his 5iver from Coast to Coast and put over 11k on his truck in the process.

And this is no rookie we're talking about. He used to own a trucking business in Texas (where he still is, thankfully) with several tractors and even more trailers. So he didn't just fall off the turnip truck or escape the Bronx.

But he set his truck up to pull that kind of weight, too. AIrbags, etc. I think the '13 still had springs, so it was probably easier.
 
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