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I am on my second set of Ridge Grapplers size 295/65r20.
Towing has been great with them, even towing over 16k (horses going from Texas to Tennessee and back).
Like others have said, load positioning is a major factor in reducing sway.
On my move to Alaska, my Camaro was a few inches further back than I should have placed it and I had a noticeable amount of sway.
When I put it back on the trailer in California (had an extended stay with family en route) the rest of the trip was great with no sway. That again was only a few inches of difference in positioning.
The first set however did bust cords on three of the four tires after over 30k miles. Discount tire helped out big time with that though. All four were replaced under the tire warranty.
 

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Falken's look great and balanced perfect. 2.75 was the most called for out of the 4. They have really sticky beads to the point I could not rotate them to line up my dots. I had to remove the top bead and align them as close as possible. So I don't for see my tire spinning on my rims again and yes that was even using the proper tire lube. They also took near 60 psi to seat the beads. The 295/60R20 in this tire looks to be perfect if your not wanting much of a bigger tire. So far they ride great and are smooth cruising at 50 to 90. You can barely feel the new tire 15/32nds squirm as they need broke in a bit.
 

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I love the look of the nitto's but for the issues I've had and the price I will never run them again or sell them to a customer unless they ask for them. These are also night and day quieter then the toyo at2 x. Can you hear these? Yes but only just. 60 psi front and 40 rear empty anyway seems perfect.
 

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I know of a guy who tows a horse shoeing trailer all over the west. Darn heavy. In addition he tows a toyhauler to Glamis frequently.
He knows the manager of a local Discount. They installed some Falkens on a 3500 Ram in order to gauge long term use. We'll see shortly as he racks up the miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
What size were the KM3? This is random but just curious if you had any rub at full lock with the 295/60/20 Ridge Grapplers you had, or the KM3 for that matter
Zero rub on the factory BAP wheels that came on the truck at full lock.
 

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I just had some BFG KM3 installed 2 months ago and when I towed my 9k travel trailer the squirm was almost scary. Felt like the tires induced sway.

A month later I swapped those out for a set of nitto ridge grapplers in 295/60r20 mounted on the factory 20’s, the ride improved but still pushes me around in VERY light wind and small cars passing by me. This never happened with the factory trans force tires.

I run 65psi front and 80psi cold when towing, they get up to 90psi per the tpms.

Are the toyo AT2 a better towing tire? What about the Falken AT3w? I need AT tire at the very least because of the terrain I travel.

My hitch is a blue ox sway pro, 12% tongue weight and my truck is a 2018 CCSB 4x4. It’s properly aligned, has a 1” spacer as a leveling kit and I added firestone “red label” airbags that I run 12psi in when I tow.
You need more weight on the front end.

Get some airbags.

Yesterday
 

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You need more weight on the front end.

Get some airbags.

Yesterday
According to the post, he already has "air bags". But even if he didn't, how would air springs in the rear put any measurable weight on the front?!?

That's a job for a weight distributing hitch.
 

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According to the post, he already has "air bags". But even if he didn't, how would air springs in the rear put any measurable weight on the front?!?

That's a job for a weight distributing hitch.
Simple physics.




If the vehicle is exactly level, the weight distribution is whatever is built into it.

If the truck tilts backwards, weight shifts backwards with it. Same thing if the truck (or any other object) tilts forward.

If you're carrying something in tandem with another guy and he lifts his end way up, some of the weight shifts to your end. (hint; when carrying a heavy mattress up the stairs, take the front end)

If his end is tilted up 90 degrees, ALL of the weight shifts to your end.

Same principle holds true with cars/trucks.

By taking too much weight off the front end, the steering becomes 'light' and has less control over the vehicle.

He needs to get that front end down, IMHO. Airbags or no.

:blues:
 

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Alright, I'll try again:

....put any measurable weight on the front?!?
Not having calculated it, I'm guessing that by raising the rear by a foot, in a static situation it may result in shifting some 50 lbs. to the front. Maybe.

Wouldn't a properly set up weight distributing hitch be a better solution?
 

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The proper wheel width helps heaps.
I'm going from 8" stockers to 9" wide as recommended for a 35" Toyo At2's.
I've always had squirm with my 2000 # camper and the At2's.
The most solid tire I've had was an M-55.
 
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Alright, I'll try again:

....put any measurable weight on the front?!?
Not having calculated it, I'm guessing that by raising the rear by a foot, in a static situation it may result in shifting some 50 lbs. to the front. Maybe.

Wouldn't a properly set up weight distributing hitch be a better solution?
Yes. I have the factory air bags and they don’t transfer any significant weight back to the front axle according to the scale.
 

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Simple physics.




If the vehicle is exactly level, the weight distribution is whatever is built into it.

If the truck tilts backwards, weight shifts backwards with it. Same thing if the truck (or any other object) tilts forward.

If you're carrying something in tandem with another guy and he lifts his end way up, some of the weight shifts to your end. (hint; when carrying a heavy mattress up the stairs, take the front end)

If his end is tilted up 90 degrees, ALL of the weight shifts to your end.

Same principle holds true with cars/trucks.

By taking too much weight off the front end, the steering becomes 'light' and has less control over the vehicle.

He needs to get that front end down, IMHO. Airbags or no.

:blues:


The physics in relation to carrying a couch upstairs is true. However, relating it to this situation is not because the fulcrum point is between 2 forces which is why his front end lifts with or without bags. A properly set up weight distributing hitch will with anti sway cams like already suggested will solve the issue. They are so effective that overkill bars can be tightened up to the point the rear of the truck will lift above ride height and the front will squat.


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Alright, I'll try again:



Not having calculated it, I'm guessing that by raising the rear by a foot, in a static situation it may result in shifting some 50 lbs. to the front. Maybe.

Wouldn't a properly set up weight distributing hitch be a better solution?
Yes.

Airbags don't hurt but a WDH is more gooder for a pull behind.
 

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According to the post, he already has "air bags". But even if he didn't, how would air springs in the rear put any measurable weight on the front?!?

That's a job for a weight distributing hitch.
To answer your question, tests have been done showing many hundreds of pounds will shift front and rear depending on the angle of the truck. Not just a few pounds..... hundreds of pounds.

A WDH is a better solution but sometimes it's not enough. Sometimes they need a little help.

A WDH also puts weight back on the trailer axles. Airbags can't do that very well. They do it a little bit by lifting the tongue but that's not the whole solution.

The OP needs to change the pitch of the truck, IMHO. One way or the other.
 

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To answer your question, tests have been done showing many hundreds of pounds will shift front and rear depending on the angle of the truck. Not just a few pounds..... hundreds of pounds.

A WDH is a better solution but sometimes it's not enough. Sometimes they need a little help.

A WDH also puts weight back on the trailer axles. Airbags can't do that very well. They do it a little bit by lifting the tongue but that's not the whole solution.

The OP needs to change the pitch of the truck, IMHO. One way or the other.
I'd be curious to see those test results. For some reason I just can't picture large amounts of weight shifting as a result of changing the angle by a few degrees. Not even if raising the rear by a foot, as I suggested above in an exaggerated example.

Also, I don't understand why a properly sized and adjusted WDH would need any help. The WDH should lift the rear without needing any assistance from air springs.

And, I don't understand how lifting the tongue a little bit (with air springs) puts any noticeable extra weight on the trailer axles. Unless that weight shift is as large as you claim, and/or there's a cluster of large A/C units on the roof of the trailer, right over the axles.
Then it's also a matter of if the trailer has torsion axles or not, and if so, how level it is in the first place.
 

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It's not the tires. Wish you lived closer, I'd take all your cast off "bad" tires!
Concentrate on the trailer/truck setup.
And as usual with most new deep lug tires, don't judge the tire's performance for the first 1-2,000 miles until they get the wiggles out of them!
 
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Judging by the photo, your truck and trailer are both nose high. You need to drop the ball height to get the trailer nose down then adjust the WDH chains to get the truck level. Be aware that as you put tension on the spring bars to level the truck the nose of the trailer will move up so my advice would be to start with a ball height that puts the trailer just a bit low, about an inch, and go from there. Remember too that the trailer tongue weight will make the rear of the truck sag a bit so figure that in when setting up your initial ball height. On most WDH the tension bars should be very close to parallel with the trailer tongue rails when you are finished. Hope this helps, good luck.
 
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