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What is the torque spec for the factory drag link, I want to perform my own “recall” fix because I’ve seen some of the welding FCA has performed.

I’m going to be ordering a full thuren front kit later on this year but I do not want the dealer to perform this recall.
 

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Mine was replace with in 5K when I bought it, also I’ve had it aligned by a real truck alignment shop sense dealers can seam to work on HD trucks. I’m just going to call my dealer.
 

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I’m not getting mine welded, I just keep an eye on the adjuster nuts. I’ve never found them loose, IMO it’s not worth loosing the ability to adjust the drag link over something I haven’t had an issue with. If I start finding mine loose I’ll weld it myself.
 

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... not that I have a crows foot big enough to actually use a torque wrench on it.. I’ve always just made them extra extra snug.
You know what's the correct tool for the job?
I'm still trying to unsee the photo of two pipe wrenches being used.
 
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I have marks on mine, if I notice anything funky I’ll use red lock-tight on them
 

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... not that I have a crows foot big enough to actually use a torque wrench on it.. I’ve always just made them extra extra snug.
You know what's the correct tool for the job?
I'm still trying to unsee the photo of two pipe wrenches being used.
Pipe wrenches are for pipes. I can’t remember the size but I have some larger combo wrenches left over from my heavy equipment repair days that I used. Even a large adjustable would work. If I was going to torque to spec I would use a crows foot attached to a torque wrench, I just don’t have them up that large in my set.

I just went by feel on mine.

Something like this pic below, which was borrowed from google.
 

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Even a large adjustable would work.
Adjustable wrenches are a not too distant second to pipe wrenches in my mind. A last resort, if you will.

But like you, I don't have a large enough crow foot to use the torque wrench. Luckily it's fairly easy to guesstimate the force needed to achieve about 100 ft.-lbs. with the size wrench needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you very much for the useful information
 

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How in the world can Ram or anybody here make putting an end wrench on a nut and tightening it up so complicated? For 100 years there has was never "torque requirements" for anything other than head bolts and the like. You just tighten things up appropriately for their size and be done with it. If they need a lock washer or Loctite, so be it.
PS the offset length of a crow's foot would increase the leverage and thus the torque being applied by the torque wrench.
 
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I have a few owners manuals for older cars that must have been way ahead of their time, because they include torque specs for all kinds of fasteners on the vehicle. Same with old shop manuals.

If anything, it seems to me that while there used to be torque values given for almost everything in the past, now they are harder to come by.

To get the correct torque value when using a torque wrench on a crow foot is easy. It only requires basic knowledge of geometry.
Or, it can also be achieved by taking the added length into account if having the crow foot in line with the torque wrench.
 

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Yep, I found the table above and used some simple math to use a crows foot to torque mine down. The nut on the passenger side of the adjust sleeve came loose on mine. I cleaned the threads out with some IPA, applied red loctite, and torqued her down. Been fine for over 5k miles so far. Mine came loose with around 55k on the truck.

Sure beats some tech slapping on some booger welds...
 

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Use a flare nut crow's foot and calculate new torque

I am not an expert. Use this info at your own risk knowing only that this is how I would do it as a non-expert idiot:

Use a flare nut type crows foot to prevent spreading of a normal crow's foot with a wobble (u-joint) flex section to get some clearance so the torque wrench ratchet head body doesn't hit the nut points (false torque parasitic drag) and re-calculate the toque setting (will be lower).

Measure center of your torque wrench handle where your hand rests to center of the drive; let's say it is 20 inches. Then measure center of the crows foot section (estimated center by eye sight) to center of its drive, let's say it's 3".

If the required torque is 109 lb./ft then divide that by the length of 20" and that equals 5.45 lb/ft per inch of wrench so the 3" extension will add 16.35 lb/ft so set the wrench at 92 to 93 lb/ft and it will equal approximately 109 lb/ft at the center of the drag link nut. 92 setting = 108.35 or 93 setting = 109.35 lb./ft.

How: Me, I would match mark the existing nuts to the center link with a contrasting paint pen color, then back off one of the nuts at a time well past that nut's linear width down the threaded rod holding the center link stationary with a backup wrench. SS wire brush the nut seat threads and use 91% alcohol to clean away debris and oil and spin the loose nut up and back while pouring alcohol over it to clean nut ID also. Then dry the treaded section COMPLETLY and use Loctite 271 or 272 (red) and retorque the nut and record the new position compared to the original paint mark (by a photo). it might be tighter due to lubricity of the Loctite. The red Loctite is very hard to break free later in life during alignments but can be done.

Note: One nut and rod end is left hand threads.

Keep in mind I am an idiot and not an expert. Check with someone smart and certified on Ram trucks before performing.
 
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