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I am amazed, we get a prediction for half a foot of snow and it caused a pre thanksgiving/christmas dinner shopping spree that literally clears shelves of food. I made the mistake of going on my normal costco run thursday (usually a slower day), couldnt hardly move in that place (one up in Burlington). The frantic behavior was like that of a impending hurricane.

This place always been like this? Makes me wonder if this is what hollywood is like before a cold snap to the low 50s but with less sweaters and beards.
 

· Rear Admiral Rickard Onmi
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meanwhile, just another day in eastern washington.....



most of the westerners have no idea how to drive in a little white stuff. It's honestly kinda funny how bad they over react to a little Canadian sky fluff falling down everywhere
 

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I know, right? I had to turn off the local news down here due to the frantic nonsense they were spewing. The first 15 minutes was all about what to stock up on, what to do with your vehicle's tires, how to replace or top off your vehicle's coolant, how to keep your outdoor faucets from freezing, yadda yadda yadda... Snowflakes apparently cause snowflake hysteria... ;)

I gotta get out of this area.
 

· Rear Admiral Rickard Onmi
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wait....hold the phone. how to top off your coolant? like in case people were running straight water? isn't that something that is just regular maint. info, like check your coolant level, don't run straight water, use the correct coolant and mixture for their vehicle
 

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I am amazed, we get a prediction for half a foot of snow and it caused a pre thanksgiving/christmas dinner shopping spree that literally clears shelves of food. I made the mistake of going on my normal costco run thursday (usually a slower day), couldnt hardly move in that place (one up in Burlington). The frantic behavior was like that of a impending hurricane.

This place always been like this? Makes me wonder if this is what hollywood is like before a cold snap to the low 50s but with less sweaters and beards.
Just been like this since the massive spike in Californication over the last decade.

meanwhile, just another day in eastern washington.....

most of the westerners have no idea how to drive in a little white stuff. It's honestly kinda funny how bad they over react to a little Canadian sky fluff falling down everywhere
Hey now...Don't confuse native westerners with the southern invaders... Those retards out there panic buying are all transplants from the south.

Reminds me of several years back when we got a good amount of snow and all of said transplants were abandoning 4x4 SUV's all over the side of I-90. Meanwhile I'm driving my rear wheel drive 87 S10 pickup with regular all season tires, no chains, some weight in the bed (old excavator sprockets), and getting along just fine.



I was born and raised west of the mountains outside of the cities. I've watched this whole area get clear cut and over developed over the past 35 years. Been here through plenty of severe storms and even the really nasty ice storm we had 20+ years ago where it snowed a good 12 inches, then was freezing rain to add a layer of ice on top of the snow, then it snowed more, and then another layer of ice... there was so much snow and ice it brought a LOT of trees down because they were too heavy and the snow was frozen over by ice to the branches. that knocked out power for almost 3 weeks with how many trees it brought down and the roads were definitely nasty that year with all of the hills we have over here. We had one in the last 10 years that wasn't near as bad, but the ice still brought down a lot of tree branches and trees. Ice storms are the only thing ya really need to worry about since it doesn't just fall out of the trees when it gets too heavy like snow does. Snow is nothin.

Seen several houses destroyed from the ice storms too. trees crashing right into the house crushing the roof and walls. Those are no joke around here in the rural areas..But what's coming isn't an ice storm...Just a little snowfall.

Tell you what though: it is scary to drive in the snow around here when you're surrounded by idiots in lesbarus and californians that don't have a clue how to drive in the snow...

Had a good laugh that same snowing with the S10 when I was doing my usual 10-15 under the speed limit in the snow covered road and a stupid kid in a Subaru WRX passed me... I caught up to him a mile later and he was in the ditch and his car was all crunched up on the side... I rolled my window down, pointed and laughed as I drove by :hehe: kid was in a big hurry to get to that ditch! 4x4/AWD does not make you invincible. snow and ice don't give a rats arse how much "traction" you think you have. go too fast and try to turn...your arse is gonna find that ditch real fast.
 

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Funny part is I came from Northern California originally, grew up just above the snow/tree line. We only got snow about 2 or 3 times a year but it ranged from 1-2.5ft. Sucks getting the 2wd dually flatbed home especially the last 2 miles of gravel and loggin road we lived on.

Living in CO for a few years I learned the ice driving routine, then all over the east coast with the thick white stuff again.

Jigabop not sure if you were around during the 2010/11 "blizzard" they had over on the peninsula but that was some funny stuff. We didnt get off the sub till about 1930 and the drive home took hours because of all the abandoned vehicles all over the place and the long backups with people stuck all over. Had to take my truck all the way around town and come in the less traveled path just to get home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
meanwhile, just another day in eastern washington.....



most of the westerners have no idea how to drive in a little white stuff. It's honestly kinda funny how bad they over react to a little Canadian sky fluff falling down everywhere
That looks like a real nice area out there. Wouldnt mind being on the East side myself just stuck in my current job.
 

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Reminds me of several years back when we got a good amount of snow and all of said transplants were abandoning 4x4 SUV's all over the side of I-90. Meanwhile I'm driving my rear wheel drive 87 S10 pickup with regular all season tires, no chains, some weight in the bed (old excavator sprockets), and getting along just fine.
I've mentioned it before, and it's only a mild exaggeration; when I moved to the USA (CA) I had to learn to drive on dry pavement.

My first car probably spent more time going sideways than straight (in the summers I'd do rally car imitations on the dirt roads) and I developed a real liking for "drifting".

But it takes a bit of driver awareness and feel for the vehicle to do that kind of stuff, and with all the nannies on modern vehicles, not to mention the all-mighty 4WD, actual driving is quickly becoming a lost art, I think
 

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So... 1984 I finished school in Pennsylvania and the USAF sent me to San Antonio. At the time I had an E350 long body, long wheel base Econoline. I'd picked it up so I wouldn't have to rely on the military to move my stuff.

I had a bag of sand in the back...some of those folding metal mesh traction helpers.. chains.... and a snow shovel. I mean, I grew up in New England, spent four years in Bethlehem... didn't even think of getting rid of that stuff.

Last weekend of 1984 San Antonio had 5.3 inches of snow. First weekend of 1985 San Antonio had 13.1 inches of snow.

It was the apocalypse. That hadn't happened in generations. Buildings were falling down, not designed for snow loads, you know. Pretty much every carport in the city folded over on its contents.

I lived in an apartment on a hillside, driveway wound back and forth up the hill through some shallow switchbacks. Day after the big snow, nothing but dead cars blocking the driveway. Crashed into each other.... stuck on curbs... blown transmissions drained of fluid, the fluid now running in small rivers down the hillside. No one knew how to drive in snow. No one.

It was a group effort to clear the driveway. I got my shovel from the van and joined the other residents. Shovel -- I had the only snow shovel ... the rest were garden spades -- push, heave ... move each car out of the way, move on to the next. After a few hours I was pretty tired. Another guy said, "Hey, buddy, you've been doing this longer than I have. Let me spell you."

I gratefully handed him the snow shovel.

He dug into the drift we were working on. He took four or five strokes, started to clear a spot.

Stopped. Held the snow shovel at arm's length. Studying it.

"WOW!", he said, "... it's like...it's like this thing is MADE to shovel snow!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I've mentioned it before, and it's only a mild exaggeration; when I moved to the USA (CA) I had to learn to drive on dry pavement.

My first car probably spent more time going sideways than straight (in the summers I'd do rally car imitations on the dirt roads) and I developed a real liking for "drifting".

But it takes a bit of driver awareness and feel for the vehicle to do that kind of stuff, and with all the nannies on modern vehicles, not to mention the all-mighty 4WD, actual driving is quickly becoming a lost art, I think
Totally right IMHO. Back when you had to use your mirrors to back up, was careful of locking up the drum brakes, kept your eyes on the road since ya could flip the cassette over by feel, and could recover from a sideways action when the rear end got going to fast :grin2: . Also you could go play around in a deserted parking lot when it snowed and no one cared, really learned how the vehicle would react and how to control it. Course if you hit a hidden curb and broke your car the cops would come by to get a good laugh and call the tow truck for ya.

The first time I drove the wifes 1500 silverado to work it freaked me out, I got to close to someone on I-5 and the seat and steering wheel started vibrating and the dash warnings lit up. Thought I had blown the darn thing up. Took some getting use to with the vehicle avoidance things. Its like they want people on there cell phones while driving ....
 

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The first time I drove the wifes 1500 silverado to work it freaked me out, I got to close to someone on I-5 and the seat and steering wheel started vibrating and the dash warnings lit up. Thought I had blown the darn thing up. Took some getting use to with the vehicle avoidance things. Its like they want people on there cell phones while driving ....
Yep. The first time I drove a pickup with that kind of stuff on it, and the dash lit up, I also thought that I had blown something up.
Can't say that it helped me keep my concentration where it should've been; on driving.
 

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I having been driving a little low slung FWD car in the latest WA weather and found I do not know how drive with traction control enabled. I was having trouble navigating 12-18" deep snow until I turned it off and then was able to get everywhere. I did "cheat" one day when there was 18" slush on the roads and pulled out the 4wd truck, but I also found I could drive it better with traction control disabled. Both reduced my ability to keep momentum by adjusting the amount wheel spin for maximum forward motion. It seems that traction control is only concerned about keeping all the wheels spinning at the same speed without regard to actual movement. I'm glad I can disable this "safety" technology but is there a way to drive with it enabled when traction is at a minimum? I couldn't even get out of the reverse slope driveway with it enabled.
 

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pretty sure it says in the owners manual of my car to disable traction control for snow lol. it's only really meant for rain.


But while digging out my car yesterday I took a picture of the snow we got.



the snow on the ground next to the car is what came off the cleared section of the top. I shoveled a path all the way down to the concrete just to get to the roof to clear it.

Snow level was up over the wheels and bumpers and half way up the doors. Got it all dug out though. Took a while.
 
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I think those nannies, like traction control, are meant to bring all drivers down to the lowest level of competence, making driving fair and equal for all.
Oh great! Now everyone gets a participation ribbon, but no one gets to where they want to go. Since when have vehicle designers become so politically correct?
 

· Rear Admiral Rickard Onmi
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The other thing they don't really design correctly is for snow accumulation inside the wheel well. i wish i had taken a picture of the fronts, but i had some rubbing while turning issues the other day, which isn't normally a thing for me. turns out it's just a winter thing. Took a picture of the rear wheel wells though to tell the story

 

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The other thing they don't really design correctly is for snow accumulation inside the wheel well. i wish i had taken a picture of the fronts, but i had some rubbing while turning issues the other day, which isn't normally a thing for me. turns out it's just a winter thing. Took a picture of the rear wheel wells though to tell the story
Now that you mention it...

I don't remember having issues like that after driving on unsalted roads, but have spent quality time getting chunks of ice out of wheel wells after being on salted roads.

And please don't get me started on having to drive through slush, courtesy of salt, as opposed to nice, clean, hard packed snow.
 

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pretty sure it says in the owners manual of my car to disable traction control for snow lol. it's only really meant for rain.
The only mention I see of turning it off is once you are stuck - I found I would not get stuck in the first place if I just disabled it. Enabling traction control resulted in getting stuck often because you cannot power through deeper snow and will lose your momentum. Remember, this an observation from a low slung auto that is plowing with its lower air dam at depths over 6" but even the truck did better if I could induce a little spin once in a while to clear the tread. This was the first time I had driven the DRW 4wd unloaded in the snow which also did not help - Normally, it has 2 or 3 tons of camper on the back axle and just rolls through as if slush or snow was not there usually just in 2WD. Both the truck and car are my first vehicles I have owned with traction control - Snow this high at sea level only happens about once a decade, so I have never felt the negatives of nanny control systems until now (although torque management does hamper the Ram).

I guess I was wondering if there is a different driving technique to use with traction control. Everyone had to relearn how to brake with the introduction of ABS, so maybe there is a different way to work the skinny pedal under TC.
 

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@Jimmy N. we thankfully don't use salt over here, all that buildup was thanks to driving in the snow storm, while it happened. I've honestly never had that much build up in one storm before, guess the conditions were just perfect for it

I guess I was wondering if there is a different driving technique to use with traction control. Everyone had to relearn how to brake with the introduction of ABS, so maybe there is a different way to work the skinny pedal under TC.
I think they just want you to turn in your man card and let the smart vehicle do all the hard work and thinking. Part of me isn't looking forward to when i upgrade my truck in another year or two, because the new truck will have all the nanny stuff. my 12 doesn't have any of the nanny things thanks to being just old enough to not have them with being a DRW, and new enough to have most of the modern features i actually like. Like the heated steering wheel, which i honestly thought was a gimmick, until i had one. now i couldn't dream of driving in winter without it
 

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The only mention I see of turning it off is once you are stuck - I found I would not get stuck in the first place if I just disabled it. Enabling traction control resulted in getting stuck often because you cannot power through deeper snow and will lose your momentum. Remember, this an observation from a low slung auto that is plowing with its lower air dam at depths over 6" but even the truck did better if I could induce a little spin once in a while to clear the tread. This was the first time I had driven the DRW 4wd unloaded in the snow which also did not help - Normally, it has 2 or 3 tons of camper on the back axle and just rolls through as if slush or snow was not there usually just in 2WD. Both the truck and car are my first vehicles I have owned with traction control - Snow this high at sea level only happens about once a decade, so I have never felt the negatives of nanny control systems until now (although torque management does hamper the Ram).

I guess I was wondering if there is a different driving technique to use with traction control. Everyone had to relearn how to brake with the introduction of ABS, so maybe there is a different way to work the skinny pedal under TC.
I know all about this LOL

My car was a little snow plow a year or two ago. Had a front spoiler made out of snow courtesy of the weather and roads..

Traction control always wants to nearly stall you out. It doesn't just hit the brakes but it cuts throttle as well and tries to get you stuck. Turn it off and let em spin!

 
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