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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Got a chance to work on it again on Tuesday.


I found a circular object just the right size to "trace" the fan holes out. With the holes cut, it was time to do a final positioning of the fans and drill the mounting holes.


With the fans mounted, here's what clearance looks like between the front-most part of the blades and the core. It's right at 9/16"


Also, here's the relief I had to make on the back of the passenger side fan.


Here's the holes drilled. I don't remember what size it was but I'm using M6 bolts so anything in the .236 to .275ish range would be acceptable.


On to the side mounts. I put the shroud in the truck and measured how long they'd need to be. Width is the standard 1.25"


Then I measured how far out from the shroud the holes would need to be. The two on the passenger side are identical, and the two on the drivers side are different from both the passenger side mounts and each other.


I drilled the holes and bolted them to the radiator to hold them in position...


...while I tacked them in place.


Here's the shroud with mounts and all. Time for finish welding.

I elected to do most of the welding with TIG, as I can make a better-looking TIG weld on thinner materials like this, it affords better heat control (critical to avoid warpage on such thin material) and most of the obtuse-angle joints were tight enough that I wouldn't need to add much filler.

The crap part about this is my TIG welder is at work because my boss is a cheapskate and won't buy me one for the shop, and I'm enough of a sucker that I would rather bring in my personal one than not have one in the shop. :doh:

However, There are a few acute-angle joints that it would make more sense to MIG, so I did that before loading it up in the car.


Lower tab.


Bottom of overflow tank mount.


Other side of same.


Bottom of washer fluid tank mount.


Top of washer fluid tank.


One last mockup.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
When TIGing without filler, you're essentially just using the torch to melt the two (or three) parts together at the joint. The intention was to have the welds look good enough that I could just wire-wheel any spatter off and powdercoat the shroud. In real life, I spent 3 hours battling weld contamination and co-workers who thought it was funny to keep opening the bay door behind me. :buttkick: All in all this made for some ugly welds that I'm choosing not to showcase until an angle grinder can have it's way with them.

It turns out my wife's little Subaru has a blown head gasket, so I need to get my truck back on the road most ricky tick. I'm going not going to clean the welds up and deburr the thing yet. Functional is what counts now and I will address the cosmetics later when I have time. At this time I will get all the measurements and make prints.


Despite my co-workers best efforts, these ones turned out okay. Though they were acute-angle joints, I TIGed the side mounting tabs because they're so thin.


I also decided to add some triangular braces to the backs of the side mounts.


I welded nuts to the inside of the shroud so the screws have something to thread into that doesn't require a wrench. This way you can remove either fan from the shroud without removing the shroud itself.


I like using flange nuts for this sort of thing. That way you can burn the flange down into the base material without having to add any filler.


I have found it's often necessary to chase the threads after welding nuts to something. Either the zinc coating comes off, the heat slightly distorts the threads, or you accidentally push a tiny bit of material through the threads.


The heat did cause some permanent warpage that for the most part was only perceptible on the skinny part between the two fans. The fans are on the left, and you can see how it's puckered away from them, to the right. This wasn't as bad as I might have expected, but I'm still not happy about it. You can't see it with the fans attached and it won't cause any airflow issues. If I continue to have a hair up my backside, I may weld a brace to the middle of the shroud to support this thin area.


Guess what. This isn't a mockup! It's actually completely assembled and ready to drop in the truck! :party018:

I soccer-mommed it home and got the shroud and both tanks in in 25 minutes (new personal best :thumbsup:).


Here's a profile shot.


A close-up of the overflow tank area.


The washer fluid tank area.


A blurry attempt at showing how much room is left.


Driver side fan. There's enough room to do timing through the filler hole without taking anything out. I think there's actually better access now than there was with the factory shroud.


Center...


Passenger side fan. Again, I think this has improved access (this time to the belt tensioner).

As it sits now, nothing is powered. I haven't had time and opportunity to test that switch and the junkyards haven't gotten any new Volvos. I haven't had an issue without my fan so I'm not concerned, but if a problem arises between now and when I get another relay, it won't take long to hotwire one or both fans to a manual switch in the cab.

I did have a thought on where to put the switch. The hot line going to the heater core always receives hot coolant from right behind the thermostat, the steel tube is grounded through the clamp on the exhaust manifold, and I need to double check, but the tube should work with standard compression fittings. If so, I just need to make or find a tee with the appropriate fittings and we'll be in business.

I'll look into that and the VW 2-way switch and get back.
 

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You should of used an Horten elec. clutch set up far better less work.
 

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As a first gen factory add on accessory they come up on Ebay every now and then. You wont find the fan as Horton no longer supports it but there are fans that will work.I do have the part #s, Hortons web sight is good help.
 

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Over that 2nd Gen life...
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Discussion Starter #28
Tested the switch. One circuit operated as-advertised, but the other was defective. That's good enough for me though, so I ordered a new one.

Upon inspection, the heater hard lines appear to be standard 5/8 tube, so compression fittings should work just fine. At this point I'm going to make a tee with two 1/2 NPT fittings on opposing ends and the center port will be threaded for the sensor's M22x1.5. The NPT ports will each get a 1/2 NPT x 5/8 compression adapter, then I'll just use a tubing cutter to remove however much of the tube is necessary.

As for the sensor fitting, it's hard to find taps cheaper than $50 or so, so a good alternative to machining the fitting would be to weld a spindle nut onto a 1/2 NPT female union. M22x1.5 is a fairly common spindle nut size on most newer import cars, and should be easily found at your local pick 'n' pull.

This will be my mission for next week.
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Had a bit of success last night with the sensor fitting. The lighting in some of these pictures isn't super duper so bear with me. There's also lots of machine work here, don't let that scare you. A determined individual can do with an angle grinder everything that I did with the machines.


At work, I lucked out and found this little gem in a mountain of spare hydraulic fittings.


I whacked the male fitting off real quick with the bandsaw.


I picked up the new switch (Standard brand) on my way home from work.


Bottom of the sensor.


I also picked up a spindle nut.


Here's the two threaded together.


Obviously the castellations have to go. I also want the face of the sensor to protrude forward from the nut ever so slightly, so we'll have to slim the nut up even more than just removing the castellations.


Chucked up and ready to rock.


You spin me right round baby, right round like a record baby, right round round round.


All gone.


Still have a ways to go though. Over .100"


Here the sensor protrudes forward just a few thousandths.


Can't really see it, but it sticks out no more than .007"


Now it's time to get this thing figured out. We first need to mill the rest of the male fitting off. Here it is in the milling vise.


The cutting tool is the blurry cylindrical thing at top right. If you're unfamiliar with machining operations, end mills are most easily described as a cutting tool similar in appearance to a drill bit, except that they do the majority of the cutting on the edge as opposed to on the tip, somewhat like a wood router.


The rest of the male fitting has been milled off flush with the face. This has exposed a ring of copper that has something to do with how the male fitting was attached to the tee. Apparently the male nipple was pressed or possibly brazed into place, instead of being machined out of the same piece.


Now we need to enlarge the hole to the same size as the sensor. 22mm converts to .866" and I happen to have a 7/8" drill bit in my box. Perfect. Again, drill bit is the blurry spinning thing, top center.


I ran the drill bit down until it removed material about halfway through the tube section of the fitting. Now we need to mill a recess for the nut to fit down into so that the head of the sensor is close (if not in) the coolant stream.


I didn't take pictures of this process, but I kept removing material until A) the flat edge of the nut/sensor started to peek through the threads of the female ports and B) the slot was just wide enough for the nut to drop into, and naked-eye centered.


The nut will be TIGed into place like so.


As a last minute thought, I decided to remove the square center section of the fitting in the lathe so that the main body of the fitting is cylindrical.


And we're done. Except welding. And of course, pressure-testing. I should probably give it a quick shot of black engine enamel too...

As I mentioned before, the opposing ends will use 1/2 male NPT x 5/8 compression fittings. However, since the heater tube is steel, we can't use brass fittings. The ferrule inside the fitting needs to bite into the wall of the tube to create the seal, and because brass is softer than steel... yeah, no bueno. The fittings we need are not super special, but they are most commonly used in medium-pressure hydraulic systems, so your local Pop's Hardware isn't likely to carry them. Any hydraulic shop worth their salt will have a box of these things on hand. On Monday I will swing by my local hydraulic supply house and grab some. If that doesn't work, I will order two 52215K451 fittings from McMaster-Carr.

Now I will embark upon the task of figuring out my wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Got the sloppy copy of my wiring diagram done.



Wire colors approximate actual colors. Line size approximates wire gauge except on the motor/battery grounds. Chassis grounds are represented by the hayfork symbol.

Power is supplied to each Volvo relay pack by a heavy B+ wire. These are not fused in the factory application, but I may put heavy duty fuses or possibly self-resetting circuit breakers between the battery terminal and the relays. Load wires (2 and 1 on the left side of the relay block) carry current to the respective windings in the motor. The circuit is completed by a third wire on each motor that goes to ground.

The 2 and 1 terminals in the center of the relay block are the "signal" wires. Each wire would be labeled as an 85 on a standard relay. The coils are powered internally from the 30 terminal and the coil activates circuit 1 or 2 by grounding the appropriate signal wire. These signal wires ultimately terminate at SW1 which reads coolant temperature. However, there are a couple splices into signal wire 2 that add conditions under which circuit 2 (high speed) would ground and activate.

The manual override is a "Single Pole Double Throw with center off" type switch. One outer terminal is connected to a splice into signal wire 2. The center terminal connects to a (switched) ground, and the other outer terminal is connected to the + terminal on SW1. The switch allows continuity between either outside terminal and center terminal, or no continuity between any. When + has continuity to ground, the fans function automatically according to coolant temperature. When the switch allows continuity between the 2 terminal and ground, the fans run on high speed. When the switch is in the center position, nothing is grounded and the fans won't run (unless the A/C system is activated, more on that later).

Next up is the relay, R1. The relay is there because if it just went to ground, the fans would run with truck shut off. R1 serves as a ground disconnect when the key is in the Start or Off positions. Power from the Accessory circuit activates the coil in the relay, and the load carrying side of the relay closes, giving the center terminal of SW2 a ground.

The green wire spliced into signal wire 2 connects to the A/C system. For me, it will splice into circuit C90 between connectors C165 and C227. These designations are specific to '95 trucks. Other model years may be different. This provides a ground when the A/C system is switched on. I chose this location because I want the fans running constantly while A/C is on, not cycling on and off with the compressor.

On page 8W-42-4 of the '95 FSM, it shows how the HVAC switch provides a ground to tell the PCM to cycle the compressor. I will splice into C90 wherever is most convenient between the high pressure switch and the HVAC switch itself. There's 7 or 8 connectors and enough wire to go from the dash to the compressor, so I have plenty of locations to choose from.

This ground will also supersede any setting the manual override or temperature switches are on. This is a good thing because if your A/C system is running with no airflow through the condenser, it doesn't take long for the system to stop working and possibly get damaged (not sure on that as I'm not an A/C guru). If you really need the fans manually cut off, you will also have to turn off the A/C, but I'm having a hard time imagining a scenario where this would be a problem.

But what if SW1 closes because of coolant temp and you're running the A/C at the same time? Won't the fans explode if you try to power both windings at once?

Well, yeah, they would, but a useful safety feature of the Volvo relay blocks is that they won't allow activation of both circuits at the same time. If signal wires 1 and 2 are grounded simultaneously, circuit 2 is activated and signal wire 1 is ignored, so it's a non-issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Small update...

Got the sensor fitting done except for paint.


I decided to slim the nut down. The sensor is reading temperature and the sensor doesn't care where the heat is coming from, the coolant itself or the fitting the sensor is threaded into. The more mass the fitting has, the slower the sensor will be to respond to changes in coolant temperature because the fitting temperature will serve as a thermal "ballast." The sensor having more surface area directly exposed to coolant, and the fitting itself having less mass will reduce this delay. It may have been a non-issue in the first place, but I figured now was the time to do something before it's all put together. I both turned and faced the nut down so the flats of the nut (excess material) are completely gone, and while it still does not obstruct the heater line, the sensor sticks prominently into the coolant stream.


The nut was TIGed to the tee, and this time I used stainless filler. I have reasonable suspicion that the tee is stainless steel, and stainless is easier to weld than mild steel in that it normally spatters less and has less inherent weld porosity. Stainless and mild have enough metallurgical similarity that you can generally interchange filler material with little ill effect. Here the nut is tacked into place after positioning with the sensor.


Welding completed. Stainless also has pretty colors.


Here's the 1/2 NPT x 5/8 compression adapter. $5 each at my local hydraulic supply.


Chasing threads. I cut the ports as deep as I could to allow the compression fittings to seat deeper (for aesthetics).


Here be the assembled gizmo.

Other than this, I have spent the week plodding along at getting my wiring supplies. A new Volvo showed up but it was a front impact (of course) and used a different style of fan and relay than the others, so I'm still waiting there.

I decided to put a maxi-fuse between the battery and each relay block. I had to special order the holders though because all I could find locally was hokey in-line deals. I also had much difficulty finding a decent looking SPDT rocker switch locally, so I ordered one too.

I won't have any of this stuff in time to wrap this up over the weekend, but I'll put the sensor fitting in on Saturday. That will be kind of a pain because I'll have to drain coolant and disassemble the heater hard lines, but once that's in, the rest won't require much in the way of dismantling the vehicle.

I'm going to stick the grounding relay under the dash somewhere, and the switch will go in in the place of the little dumb red LED. You know, the one right next to the O/D off button that never does anything? Putting that switch in will also be an excellent time to disable my automatic defrost A/C, as well as splice into C90 somewhere right in that immediate area.
 

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Awesome writeup! Couple of things to throw out there... This company has a solution for mounting the switches to contdol the relayz in the return hose to the radiator Mark VIII Fand Relay Kits i will be using them when i get my fan project under way.

2nd, if you run into a cooling issue with the setup consider a divider between the 2 fans so eac h fan will work truely independent from each other.

My plan is to use the hollister parts & switches with two switches that are offset from each other so fan 2 kicks on low at a higher temp than fan 1, with the divider installed and fan 1 on with fan 2 off fan 1 should pull more thru it side of the radiator core and do a better job at cooling.

Just installed a 3 core btr radiator in my '05 and will be shipping the core rad home when done here in MN. Planning on finishing the cad dwg i started and gdtting it dialed in with the volvo fans & controllers so the install is as quick as possible and easy to pull if needed...

Looking forward to hearing how your setup works.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Awesome writeup! Couple of things to throw out there... This company has a solution for mounting the switches to contdol the relayz in the return hose to the radiator Mark VIII Fand Relay Kits i will be using them when i get my fan project under way.

2nd, if you run into a cooling issue with the setup consider a divider between the 2 fans so eac h fan will work truely independent from each other.

My plan is to use the hollister parts & switches with two switches that are offset from each other so fan 2 kicks on low at a higher temp than fan 1, with the divider installed and fan 1 on with fan 2 off fan 1 should pull more thru it side of the radiator core and do a better job at cooling.

Just installed a 3 core btr radiator in my '05 and will be shipping the core rad home when done here in MN. Planning on finishing the cad dwg i started and gdtting it dialed in with the volvo fans & controllers so the install is as quick as possible and easy to pull if needed...

Looking forward to hearing how your setup works.
Those PWM controllers are interesting. Definitely out of my budget, but it's good to know they're available. Thanks for linking them. From what it sounds like, your fan control system will make the active cooling much smoother than most. :thumbsup:

You have a good point about the divider. My fans will operate in parallel so it's a non-issue for me, but it's an easy change to make. Just some more 1.25" strap and some tack welding. I did hotwire one fan to the battery and it didn't *seem* like it was pulling air back through the other fan. I'm sure it was, it's physics, but I could still feel positive airflow all the way on the other side of the A/C condenser. Stronger than the factory fan at idle. I'm intrigued to see how well it works with both fans pulling. I am also going to use foam strips to seal up some gaps between the rad/core support and possibly some other areas so I get better efficiency from the fans and even passive airflow.

Wow...do you work in Diesel Disneyland or is that home....
I am soooo envious of those toys...
Hah! Thanks! I wouldn't quite call it Diesel Disneyland, but it is a pretty cool place. All of that was done at home except for the TIG welding, and that was only done at work because I brought my personal welder in.

We're a subcontractor that cuts concrete, and our equipment ranges from handheld electric saws and drills to PTO hydraulic hand saws and core drill rigs to turbodiesel slab saws. We also employ 120 and 240v electric saws and drills, and 2- and 4-stroke gas saws from 10 to 65hp, accommodating up to 60" blades and core drills up to 36" in diameter. We even have a couple propane 30hp slab saws for use indoors. Some of it's 30 years old and been MacGyvered too many times to count. And I get to to keep it all running.

Before that I worked in a manufacturing plant where I primarily TIG welded stainless and aluminum in thicknesses ranging from .040" to .063". I also got fairly experienced on press brakes, spinning lathes, and acquired some basic machining experience. I bought my mill from that company, and the lathe came from the plant manager, who semi-restored it before selling it to me. I'll hand it to him, it can hold some pretty tight tolerances for being 60 years old. I also acquired the TIG welder from the company when they upgraded machines.
 

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Just to clarify, the link was for the fan switch sensors and the 2" sensor inserts that would go in the return line to the radiator. I wouldnt use the pwm setup for control, too many complaints on them failing, the oem volvo control unit is the way to go. Easier to get i would think.

Looking forward to hearing how it performs for ya...
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Just to clarify, the link was for the fan switch sensors and the 2" sensor inserts that would go in the return line to the radiator. I wouldnt use the pwm setup for control, too many complaints on them failing, the oem volvo control unit is the way to go. Easier to get i would think.

Looking forward to hearing how it performs for ya...
Derp. :doh:

Just checked out that page, and that is definitely a worthwhile option to be aware of. I might have sprung for that myself if I didn't already have my heater hose fitting made up, but I got that thing installed today and it turned out pretty slick in my opinion...
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)

Here's where the temp fitting will go.


Got it painted up a few nights ago. Flat black engine enamel, just so it doesn't stand out.


After removing the hot tube, I measured the compression fittings and determined that there needed to be about 7/8" of straight yube for the fitting to grab and seal against. I measured back from the bend in the tube and cut it with a tubing cutter.


I made sure the cut was clean and removed the paint with a wire wheel about 3/4" back from the cut.


I then checked the insertion depth. Good to go. I measured the assembled fitting and determined I needed to cut 4.3" off the other side of the tube.


I mocked it up, and everything fit.


In my case, clearance between the fitting and the cold tube was very close, so I rotated the hot tube up in it's mounts, just to ensure things wouldn't start rubbing.


I went to tighten down the rear mount and the bottom half of the mount just snapped off. Not sure what that was about, but whatever. A hose clamp will hold it in place for now. If you got an extra mount lying around you don't want, I'm in the market.


Here's everything locked down and ready to go. Compression fittings don't need to be very tight, especially for only holding 16psi. After reassembly, I topped off the cooling system and pressurized it by sticking a blow gun in the fitting on the radiator that the overflow hose hooks to. Then I just snugged stuff up until it quit leaking, and I went on a test drive. I pulled into a parking lot when I got to full operating temperature, and upon seeing no leaks from anything I touched, I called it a day.

When I wire this sensor, I'm going to run the wires right down into the nearby harness, then into the cab through the grommet under the steering column. The signal wires to the relays will come out of the cab through the same grommet, then I'll run them inside the battery cable loom (that goes over the top of the radiator).

I found a convenient spot to put the relays, on the front edge of the passenger side battery tray. They'll be hidden at a passing glance and all the battery wiring will be super short. Then the power wires to the fans will go in a new harness that will run right over the top of the fans, behind the shroud.

It might be hard to visualize it all, but it's going to turn out very tidy.

My maxi-fuse holders showed up today, and once my switch shows up on Monday I can dive into the sensor wiring. Then it's just one more Volvo relay and I'll really be in business.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Good news...

Another Volvo finally showed up, so I went and took it's relay. The fan was in place and intact so I grabbed it too, just to have a spare. The car was actually fully intact, and I found an extremely sweet part that will make mounting the relays a breeze. I had seen pictures of where the relays mount but by the time I got to the first two cars, this part was gone. I also knew from looking at the relays and pictures of them installed that the relays slide into a rail sort of thing as opposed to being fastened to something.


It's part of the Volvo fan shroud, a right angle of plastic about 4" both directions and 12" or so in length, with three of these little rail deals on it. The fan relay slides into this one, closest to the passenger side, and there are two other identical rails that hold other components. One looked emissions-related and the other was a relay or solenoid of some kind (I think, didn't really pay attention). The good news is they share a common profile, so the relay will slide into any of the three. One minor difference can be easily remedied with a grinding tool of your choice.


Here's my relays mocked up in the two rails on what would be the drivers side and center rail. Those two are closer together than the center and passenger side, and I can simply cut the excess shroud off and screw this to the front of my the battery tray. The difference I mentioned is that on the left-most relay you can see it doesn't seat all the way into the rail like the other one does. That is because of a rib that serves as an insertion stop, visible in the empty rail on the right. It can be easily ground back to get the same insertion depth as the neighboring rail.


Here's a shot with some 6" calipers to show scale.


Here's my maxi-fuse holders. $10 or so each on eBay. They can be mounted to a surface and are the most water-resistant option there is without spending $30+ apiece on them.


I'm not quite sure what I'm going to do with them... this mockup initially seemed like the intuitive thing to do, but there's room between the relays for one of the holders, so maybe put them next to the relay they power? That would be cleaner... we'll see on that.

A note on fusing as it pertains to these relays: I mentioned before that the factory relays are not fused. This is not technically true, because there is a fusible link between the relay and the battery. However, I've read accounts of the fan motor seizing up, the fusible link not popping, and when the driver goes to unplug either the relay or the fan, he gets burned because the wire is that hot. I've read other accounts of this same malfunction actually starting fires in the engine compartment. It is in fact so abnormal for the fan to pop the fusible link that when the link does pop, it's apparently much more concerning to Volvo owners than the fan seizing up because "something" managed to pop the link. For these reasons, I am officially declaring that the fusible link is functionally useless as it offers no practical circuit protection. :chainsaw:

I have also researched what people do for fusing on Taurus/MK8 fan swaps, and even what some Volvo owners choose to do after having a fan seize. The running draw of these fans on high speed can be generalized as "about" or "below" 30a. Even though ATO (standard blade style) fuses come in ampacities of up to 40 amps, maxi-fuses are preferred because at identical ampacity ratings, the maxi-fuses are much more tolerant of starting loads. So if you tested the same fan with an ATO and a maxi fuse, the high starting amps might/would pop the ATO while the same "size" maxi would be fine. It is known that the high-speed start of these fans is in the 55-70a range, and because of this most people choose a maxi between 50 and 70 amps. While researching, I found an account of a Volvo owner who added a maxi fuse to his fan circuit, where he stated that he ran a 30a maxi for about three years before it popped. He did not allude to any out-of-the-ordinary circumstances so I think it's reasonable to assume that it had simply had enough of the starting loads. When I go get some maxi fuses tonight, I'm going to get a 40 and a 50 for initial testing. If none blow I'll replace the 50 with another 40 and keep the 50 for a spare. If the 40 blows, I'll get two more 50s and call it good. If both blow out of the gate, I will have demonstrated why none of you should be listening to me. :rof

As far as the switches go, I made a bonehead move and ordered the wrong one, so I'm again waiting several days to have two $1.30 parts shipped to me for $6.50. Also I found a new heater tube mount, that should be here tomorrow.

I have all my wiring and connectors squared away, so I will probably start on the under-hood wiring tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
Got the relay and fuse mount done today.


This picture shows how I initially trimmed the piece of Volvo shroud.


Here's the back. I later removed the interlocking tabs.


I initially hung the Volvo shroud piece on the front of the battery tray for a mockup only, but then realized this positioning was perfect.


Here's a shot from the front. You have to really look to see what's under there. Time to remove the battery tray to mount it.


Because my stereo is a pain to program, I opted to not completely dismantle the battery cabling. I disconnected the passenger battery only. Ground first, then when I disconnected the positive cable, I stuck a thick heavy glove over the terminal so we wouldn't get any surprise spark showers.


Here's with the battery out. Pretty nasty...


Here's the tray removed.


At this point, I started fitting the Volvo piece to the front of the battery tray. I used a carbide burr to remove protrusions from the inside vertical face of the Volvo piece, so that it would sit flush against the tray.


I just eye-balled it and fastened the Volvo piece to the battery tray with some zip screws.


Here's with everything reinstalled. Contrary to what you might imagine, the relays are actually not in the way of reaching the headlight. I have to go under the relays from behind the battery, but it's very doable. The headlight socket is not as visible, but for as often as a person replaces headlight bulbs, I think I'll manage.


I picked up some fuses and decided to remove the brand sticker from the top of the fuse holders. My truck is not a billboard.


Still gotta get the rest of the sticker goop off, but now you can see what size the fuses are through the cover.


This is the position I settled on for the fuse holders.

I plan to start wiring in earnest tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Sorry about the lack of updates. Long story short, the wiring is done, the fans themselves are AWESOME, and I've run into issues getting the switch operating as it's supposed to. I had to go back and do R&D on the switch fitting, and ultimately will have to find a different switch to use.

I will post an update on the wiring in a day or two, probably won't have any headway on the switch until next week.
 
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