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No clue what it costs, call a vendor. as for quality I don't think anyone would say Steed speed is anything but top notch quality. You may not see them in the diesel magazines, but you will see them in competition.


looks like scheid's is a vendor



also curious why you did not follow Chris Kreb's build and do a 5000/7000 setup, he broke 1000 hp with that setup awhile back.
 

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From your other thread
I will be doing pull in 3rd with TC locked. Start at 50 mph which equals 2000 rpm. slowly spool turbo then slam the pedal take it all the way to 3500-3600 rpms.
you won't really be seeing how the truck spools if you start your dyno run at 2k. you won't have any gauge on the compound setup vs the large single. I don't see what good a 2k start does for trying to show how well a setup spools vs another setup, IE: single vs Compounds. A lot of truck make their peak torque before 2k so if you are wanting to do comparisons it seems like your runs should start closer to 1500 rpm.

Also worth pointing out that the drag comp fuels to 3200 rpm, then it will stop fueling via tuning and the stock ecm tune takes over. at 3200 rpm the stock tune starts pulling fuel, more aggressively as you head towards 3500 rpm, at 3500 rpm the ecm starts going into runaway protection mode and sets the fueling command to basically 0. if you try and run out RPMS to 3500-3600 rpms your power is going to fall of the face of the earth after the edge stops fueling at 3200 rpm

Here is from Edge the specs of the Drag Comp

Rectangle Font Screenshot Parallel Number



here is a datalog to shows what happens to the stock fueling command past 3000 rpm on the blue bars, orange bars are the quad and you can ignore that. note that the fueling commands fall off from ~3400 ( %75 of possible fueling) to ~600 ( which is about idle command) the end of the bar graph is going from 3000 rpm to 3500 rpm.

Rectangle Font Parallel Electric blue Pattern



what this means is when the edge stops fueling at 3200 rpm your hp and torque will fall off fast as the fueling commands from the ecm are going to 0 rapidly. Doesn't matter how big your sticks are if the vp is not being told to fuel the injectors won't fuel.


if you want to make as high as possible in RPMS and you want to stick with the edge then you need to run a edge juice with attitude comp with level 7 hot hot unlock and it will try to fuel to ~3600. the normal edge drag just won't give you power above 3200 rpm as it is not programmed to.

 

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you might call edge and ask them. "after 3150" is a pretty open statement, 3175 is after 3150 so is 5000. I think what you have in the manual is marketing and that is why the current manual says " up to 3200" For as long as I can remember the drag comp has stopped fueling at 3200 or 3200 or something like that. The numbers used to be 150 hp over stock, but that changed. That hp over stock is only useful for a stock injector truck and really should be thrown out for a modded truck . Same goes for the quad numbers or the tst number for "over stock" they are all best case with a stock injector truck. when you are talking about 500 + hp then the numbers of over stock are %100 useless and you are better off ignoring them. Point is you do not have any tuner fueling beyond 3200 rpm, this is why edge came out with the hot hot unlock and for extra money you can buy a new tuner that fuels to 3600..... kinda like DDP and the injector upgrade issue in my opinion.


Your butt dyno is lying to you when you think it pulls hard to 3500, it might rev out to 3500, but the fueling is falling off VERY fast after 3200. Dyno sheet after dyno sheet and datalog after datalog show this. Your truck is no different. VP trucks make power between 2k and 3k rpm as they approach 3k hp falls off rapidly. This is due to the physics of a rotary pump. As you spin them faster they have to work harder and harder to deliver the same MM/S worth of fuel to the injectors. as some point the pump just can't overcome the spinning force of the pump and it no longer can pump enough fuel fast enough per stroke to make the engine spin above 3500 rpm . Doesn't matter if it is a stock SO pump or a monster mike pump or whatever.

Don't expect to see power holding at 3500 rpm regardless of tuning.
 

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Kinda missed the point

again stop reading "for XX hp" that's not how it works, what you gain is the fueling from 3200 rpm to 3600 rpm. That's the important part when you are wanting to hold power beyond 3200 rpm when comparing the edge drag comp and other tuners.

However I am betting you will hit peak hp before 3k rpm so the extra rpms don't gain you anything.
 

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Well I adjusted Water Meth and tried some pulls from 1500 RPM and I'm sorry guys it just isn't going to happen that way. It simply will not hold. I have to hit about 40-45 mph then nice and evenly lay on pedal till it lights then hammer it and it's utter Armageddon!!!. So this dyno session will be strictly be a how much Horsepower am I making.
what doesn't hold, your trans?

I don't follow, why do you have to pedal until it lights?
 

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hopefully the dyno reads rpms from the crank rather than calculating based on wheel speed / tire size / and ratios.

A slipping trans can really skew the numbers depending on how it is reading RPMS.

I'd hold off until you fix your trans. if you are blowing through the converter / trans and rpms are being calc'd from wheel speed you will end up showing that the truck makes significantly more power at low rpms because the dyno will show like 1500 rpms based on wheel speed, but the engine will actually be turning 2400 rpm.
 

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what he means is... not human error... mechanical error.... slipping trans, similar to slipping clutch or belt will only hold what it will hold. your 1000hp goal may look like 650 with a slipping trans even though its a 1000hp setup..

imo should worry about not blowing a rod through the block after 3200rpm more than hp numbers.

but.. good luck
exactly, accurate in terms if wheel hp/tq vs wheel hp/tq and the typical driveline loss.

hope you hit 800, but i think that is a tall order with a slipping trans that might not build load and get tq numbers high enough in the vp44 sweet spot to make 800 hp. we will see
 

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HP is a function of torque. The reason why cr trucks make closer to 1:1 HP to tq is because their pumps can fuel to 5k+ rpms.

HP = torque x rpm / 5250. Plug in 5250 as your rpm and now torque = HP.

A common rail pump will make high torque down low then keep torque high until much higher in the rpm band compared to a vp truck, this results in a 1:1 between HP and torque.

This is math and has nothing to do with being impressed.


You should be impressed by the ucc numbers, keeping up torque at 5k rpm is impressive. Cr trucks make all the torque a vp can make and then holds it from 2k to 5k rpm. Calling that anything but impressive is ignoring what is happening.
 

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Is it useable??? I am perfectly aware that trucks engines explode when their rpm's drop down into the danger zone. Sled pulling trucks survive as long as they do because they keep rpm up above 4000 rpm. if they drop into 2500 range kaboom. the engine cannot handle the stress of all that torque.

My stock connecting rods are only safe till 1800 ft lbs maybe 2000 but thats a stretch.

If a truck did 2000 horsepower and 4000 torque wouldnt the score be the same or is that not how they score at UCC.
The only thing I am trying to say is that HP is nothing more than a calculation of Torque over time AKA RPM's Has nothing to do with "danger zones"

to calculate HP you use the equation HP = Torque * RPM / 5250

so if a truck that did 3000hp 3000ft/lb then it made 3000 Ft/lb of torque at 5250 RPM. I am betting it was above 1500 ft/lb by 2700 rpm. If that is not impressive I don't know what is. I don't know how they score UCC.

In order to do 2000hp and 4000 ft/lb you would need to do that at ~2600 rpm to make the math work, gonna take a lot more Liters of displacement to do that, which I don't find impressive compared to the UCC truck.
 

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What Carb is saying is that Turbo blankets work by keeping all the heat, AKA energy, in the turbine, rather than in the engine bay. This heat ,aka energy, spins the turbine. Cooler engine bay temps is just a nice side effect of the important part that they use in marketing. The energy has to go someplace and we want to keep it in the turbine, that's why a turbo blanket works

the important point is Heat = Energy. More energy is what you are after.

you need to separate out Charge Temp and Coolant Temp.

Yes Charge temp is effected by coolant temp, but not as much as you are thinking, your innercooler and water/meth setup effect air temp a whole lot more. The air spends a relatively short amount of time in the engine so heat soak is not as great as you might think provided there is enough airflow through the engine bay, hence the big fans for a dyno. yes it can be an issue, but only in very specific situations that you have no way of knowing if you will encounter.

there are 2 things you are overlooking

1. It is %100 possible to have charge temps too cold if your tune does not advance timing enough to keep the combustion event at the right spot in the stroke. The OEM timing curve will advance up to 8-10* of timing with a cold engine to keep the combustion even in the right spot related to TDC, they didn't do this because they are dumb. The colder you make your charge air the more timing advance you need. Since you have no control over your timing you are likely loosing out on HP as a result of super cold charge temps causing over retardation of the combustion event related to TDC.

2. any heat you suck out of the cylinders via coolant is lost energy AKA hp that could be put to the rear tires. The bigger the difference in coolant temp vs cylinder temp will result in MORE energy being transferred out of the cylinder and into the coolant then out the radiator. you are thinking this is good because cold air = dense air, but you are very likely loosing more HP as a result of sucking heat out of the engine than you are by gaining more dense air.

every MM3 worth of diesel has a specific amount of Energy, whether that energy gets put to the tires or out the radiator can make a big difference in torque and thus hp. There is a give and take to everything, but I am guessing your super low coolant temps are taking a TON of energy out of the motor. It is impossible to know what coolant temp results in the right balance, but I would wager it much closer to 200* f than 160* f.


Thermo management is an important part of racing, generally speaking they try and keep the engine as hot as possible without causing melting, F1 engines go so far as to increase coolant pressure to prevent coolant boiling until a higher coolant temp. air intake's are designed in a manner to keep the charge air at the desired temp and density for the tuning.
 
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