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How many miles when your turbo actuator failed?

  • 0-50k miles

    Votes: 11 13.3%
  • 50-100k miles

    Votes: 44 53.0%
  • 100-200k miles

    Votes: 23 27.7%
  • 200k + miles

    Votes: 5 6.0%

  • Total voters
    83
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Discussion Starter #1
Vote and post if your turbo actuator has failed.

This seems to be the most common failure on here and can be expensive.
 

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You might want to add whether the failures were on deleted\tuned trucks or stock. From what I have been seeing it seems a high number of failures were on tuned trucks. Would be interesting to see.

.
 

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Died at 53k on my bone stock 2014. Under power train warranty luckily
 

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What are your options if it fails out of warranty. Options as far as fixes that don’t break ones bank
 

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What are your options if it fails out of warranty. Options as far as fixes that don’t break ones bank
Depends on how mechanically sound you are. With a moderate amount of knowledge, AlfaOBD and some shopping around for parts you can do it yourself well under $1k. A good independent shop should be under $1500ish, the dealer will be $3-4k in a lot of cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Probably should have included an option for NEVER
Not really interested in non fails.
The point is to get an idea of what mileage these are failing at.
 

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Not really interested in non fails.
The point is to get an idea of what mileage these are failing at.
But, it's relevant info to also know that some at extremely high miles, like 414K, haven't failed, showing that they don't all go bad early.

I think what that shows is that failure of the actuator depends on the environment in which they live, like many other things on these trucks/engines.
 

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2015 had 64k before trading it in, no issues and my new 2018 has 7k and no issues. My dads 2014 with 120k no issues. Family friend with a 2016 with 92k no issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
But, it's relevant info to also know that some at extremely high miles, like 414K, haven't failed, showing that they don't all go bad early.

I think what that shows is that failure of the actuator depends on the environment in which they live, like many other things on these trucks/engines.
I don’t think it’s necessarily environment dependent. Could just be defective actuators on some of these. Even in harsh environments you should still get over 100k. I see post after post of in warranty sub 100k failures. That’s a bit worrisome. I wouldn’t worry about it as much if they were all 200k+, it’s almost expected there. Obviously you don’t have a defective one. Parts like this are generally sourced from several sub vendors. It could be one vendor putting out trash.
 

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I don’t think it’s necessarily environment dependent. Could just be defective actuators on some of these. Even in harsh environments you should still get over 100k. I see post after post of in warranty sub 100k failures. That’s a bit worrisome. I wouldn’t worry about it as much if they were all 200k+, it’s almost expected there. Obviously you don’t have a defective one. Parts like this are generally sourced from several sub vendors. It could be one vendor putting out trash.
Well, my theory of most failures is that the actuators are getting jammed up by carbon or some other buildup blocking the VGT vanes from moving smoothly. Trucks that see lots of highway miles and constant use of the exhaust brake seem to hardly have any failures.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, my theory of most failures is that the actuators are getting jammed up by carbon or some other buildup blocking the VGT vanes from moving smoothly. Trucks that see lots of highway miles and constant use of the exhaust brake seem to hardly have any failures.
I agree, I think that and failing to let a hot turbo cool down are all contributors.
Though I have also seen many that failed and still look pretty clean.
 

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Wheres @Electrojake ? He loves these types of threads. Keep in mind this is a forum. People generally join a forum when they have an issue. Kinda like AA, you dont go for the refreshments. That said the people on this forum make up an incredible small percentage of dodge Cummins owners. Even if half the members here had a turbo fail it's still fairly insignificant from a statistical standpoint. Similar to the killer grid heater bolt and other issues that "plague" the Cummins. Until we reach blown head gasket 6.0 territory, drive on and be happy.
 

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Not really interested in non fails.
The point is to get an idea of what mileage these are failing at.
But you're skewing the results by not including those who don't fail at all.

There are many other factors that contribute to failure, not just mileage...which makes mileage a poor indicator of possible failure.
 

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Voted. Just got my 2015 3500 back on January 11th after having the turbo actuator replaced at 76k. It was covered under the power train warrantee. I bought the truck with 65k so I don’t know how it was used before, but I try to use the exhaust brake as much as possible. Dealer said it would have been around $3200 if I had to pay for it.
 

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And while we're at it, should probably also ask for model year.
 

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But you're skewing the results by not including those who don't fail at all.

There are many other factors that contribute to failure, not just mileage...which makes mileage a poor indicator of possible failure.
I disagree. Knowing whos has not failed will just confuse things. I mean, If this was posted 3 months ago, then I'd voted non failed (had it been an option). Infact, EVERYONE would vote Non-Failed. Then, as those that voted non-failed, experienced the failure, they would need to update to failed status at XXXX miles.

Thus leaving their original vote of non fail. Thus, causing the numbers to be skewed.

Basically, EVERYONE has experienced a non failed unit. this is a fact, unless someone bought a broken truck, then the other owner experienced a non failed VGT.
 
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