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I looked it up in the 3rd gen tech articles, there are not any threads there. But my tie rod, the one that bolts to the passanger steering knuckle has a lot of play in the tie rod end. So I got a replacement with lifetime warranty. I have the style that the steering dampener bolts through. And I was wondering are ther any special tools involved? Tie rod end press or anything? I figured I'd mark where the sleeve is currently.

Can someone give me a brief explanation on how to replace this?
 

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I'm in the same boat. Need to replace tie rods and it seams too easy. Don't want to fall into a false sense of security. Any pitfalls? Procedures?
 

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Sometimes tie rod ends can be a pain to get out but it is very simple. Just unbolt it and try hitting with a hammer, if that doesn't work maybe use a pickle fork which you should be able to borrow at a parts store. You don't have to be two worried about messing it up since it is being replaced.

Take measurements of the tie rod length and the length between the knuckles so you can get it back into alignment. Normally I forget to do this and measure the front and back of the tires. slight tow in is better than tow out.
 

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you should get it aligned afterward no matter how close you think you are.
 

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you should get it aligned afterward no matter how close you think you are.
Sorta true, but the truth is all they do with these trucks is check/adj toe and then adjust the drag link to straighten the wheel if it is needed. Not really a true alignment as the suspension is not really adj. aside from the caster adjustments on the control arms. Caster obviously won't be affected with the replacement of a tie rod end.

Point being make sure they aren't nicking you for a full "alignment". Really you just want them to adjust toe and straighten the wheel if it needs it.

You'd probably be better off just installing 4 Lukes Links and doing the track bar bushings too. It likely won't need an "alignment" at all unless the parts were super worn out, since the Lukes Links put the tie rod ends back into essentially new condition.

Do what you want :thumbsup:
Just my .02
Dan
 

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If you remove the tire, remove the tie rod nut; may have to use an impact as the nuts are nylon lock nuts. If you have hand tools and it keeps spinning in the heim joint. Just take a propane torch and burn the nylon out. Easiest way to remove then is to smack the knuckle with a hammer where the tie rod bolts on. Or a pickle fork works. To set toe pick a tread marking that is the same on both tires, or use the inside of the tire. If you look at the tire from the outside (lets say driver side) you will measure at the 3 and 6 o'clock positon. What you will do is measure from the back of both tires at the spot you picked, them measure the front. You want to have a 1/4" of toe in. This means that the front should be 1/4" shorter than the rear measurement. Ex. Lets say the rear measured to 50"; the front needs to be 49 3/4". If not in the 1/4" difference, adjust the tierods. When when you get this correct tighten teh adjusting sleeve. The adjust teh sleeve at the pitman arm to center the steering wheel. this make take some time, as you will make an adjustment the test drive. Ever time you go on a test drive the adjusting sleeve clamps must be tightened
 

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If you remove the tire, remove the tie rod nut; may have to use an impact as the nuts are nylon lock nuts. If you have hand tools and it keeps spinning in the heim joint. Just take a propane torch and burn the nylon out. Easiest way to remove then is to smack the knuckle with a hammer where the tie rod bolts on. Or a pickle fork works. To set toe pick a tread marking that is the same on both tires, or use the inside of the tire. If you look at the tire from the outside (lets say driver side) you will measure at the 3 and 6 o'clock positon. What you will do is measure from the back of both tires at the spot you picked, them measure the front. You want to have a 1/4" of toe in. This means that the front should be 1/4" shorter than the rear measurement. Ex. Lets say the rear measured to 50"; the front needs to be 49 3/4". If not in the 1/4" difference, adjust the tierods. When when you get this correct tighten teh adjusting sleeve. The adjust teh sleeve at the pitman arm to center the steering wheel. this make take some time, as you will make an adjustment the test drive. Ever time you go on a test drive the adjusting sleeve clamps must be tightened
He is exactly right. :thumbsup: Great description! Although I think you probably meant the 3 and 9 o'clock postion. I agree, you are better off doing it yourself, save the money and make sure it is right!
And if you cant get the nyloc nut off without spinning the stud(one of mine was this way) there is provisions for a 10MM wrench on top to hold the stud from turning if you don't want to melt the plastic with a torch.
 
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