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^^ yep. I was driving my water tank on the property today while full and never once felt remotely uncomfortable with the truck and it's jeep like roads. Non Baffled tank. 2400lbs. Sounds like I'm "worse" off and not having the issues.

I've done that with both 5100s previously and have fox shocks now. The fox is much stiffer than the bilsteins and doesn't appear to have changed anything. It's the timbrens that make the difference since they don't really allow the sway.
 

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It's the timbrens that make the difference since they don't really allow the sway.
Alright, edumacate me here, please. If one rear tire goes over a 10" rock and the opposite side goes into a hole, with my vehicles that means that every ounce of articulation helps.
If I have little or no articulation, which I imagine a Timbren setup results in, it seems to me that the sway would be exaggerated compared to having a compliant suspension.

Either that, or all my efforts at making my Jeep perform better on trails has been in the completely wrong direction.
Yet it still works somehow.
Yes, I know, it's not a top heavy thing like a camper, but I have lots of miles on trails with that kind of setup, too, and the same logical principles still seem to apply.
 

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My guess, and it's just a guess, is that something like Timbrens make the articulation with a load much more like the truck empty. Timbrens won't effect down travel at all and they do compress upward more than you would think, especially with a load. There is a youtube video of the Timbrens in action that I found pretty enlightening.
 

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They don't limit axle articulation like bags do, what I would personally call them is a progressive damper.

The more force against them the stiffer they get and since they work opposing each other, you don't get that back and forth bounce that a shock has to try and dampen.

If you haven't seen one, they are hollow. So really like a big rubber spring lol.
 

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They don't limit axle articulation like bags do, what I would personally call them is a progressive damper.
If by bags you mean air springs, they do not limit articulation by themselves, depending on how they're plumbed.

For example, on my Pete I ran an oversized air line between the two (I had made it a single axle) air springs, simply to allow better and quicker articulation - which translated into less sway - for when driving on a particularly bumpy and rocky "road".

I wasn't too concerned with stability on regular roads since the commercial 5th wheel keeps things in check, and why Class 8 tractors don't need more than one leveling valve.
If I ever get around to putting air springs on my 3500, they will have separate valves, but also manual valves that allow connecting the two sides together while disabling the leveling.

That "road" sure hasn't gotten any better over the years that I've taken large cabover campers, the Pete, and now a Ram 3500 towing a toy hauler over it. All at speeds well under 5 mph for the most part.
 

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I just finished a 4 day fly fishing adventure into the far side of nowhere. This included around 500 miles of crazy mountain highways and 250 miles of dirt ranging from scary death roads 100sof feet above river canyons, to gnarly muddy rutted off cambers winding around boulders and trying not to bounce the side of the camper off trees. Caught a bunch of great trout, and had ZERO camper related sway issues. This was with my 2700 lb dry Northern Lite and 14’ Jon boat on trailer behind. My camper is probably 3500 lbs with the generator, beer, venison, whiskey and a 1895 GS with 2 boxes of .45-70 thrown in. The only drama of the trip was losing my 35” Toyo MT spare off the trailer less than a mile from camp. Luckily I found it after seeing some broken branches where it hit the side of a tree while flying off the road. The take away is... Airlift 5000 bags and cheap ass Rough Country springs and shocks worked great!

Some pics just because:
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Just did my first shake down run after adding rear Timbrens. Couldn’t be happier. Body roll is sooo much better, truck is much more level and I don’t think they really effected the ride quality at all. I’d highly recommend them in your situation.


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I just put them on the rear. They are solid. Im excited to see how they do with the camper this weekend
 
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I think you'll really like them. I'm headed to the mountains myself this weekend, maybe I'll see you up there. Keep us posted on the results.
 

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Above all else with a slide-in camper, you need to find a way to get a rear sway bar installed. I had a Hellwig bar in the rear and it interfered with nearly everything and I eventually got rid of. I switched to the Roadmaster bar which is superior in every way and offers even more sway control and the link arrangement and mounting location eliminates any interference issues that I had. I also have 5" exhaust and rear bags and the Roadmaster bar clears it just fine. IMO, everything else will be a band aid with a slide-in camper if you don't have a rear sway bar.
 

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dsldude, you're on the right track, although you have to temper your expectations with the actual conditions. You state 2200lb "dry" camper, which means you have no idea how much it weighs. Snapshot in your avatar and years of having truck campers, your 2200lb camper is probably 3500lbs min. 2200lbs wouldn't require any of the suspension upgrades.
The other expectation is that this top heavy truck being humped by a white whale will somehow acceptably drive on "jeep roads" which it shouldn't due to the weight and center of gravity.
Also you've upgraded all kinds of stuff and left off the most important part, rear sway bar.
You now have more than enough suspension, maybe more than needed with helper springs and Timbrens. It ain't going to get any better without a sway bar. Period.
Also exaggerating your body roll is not engaging the lower overload.
Wedge the lower overload spring to the leaf pack and it will be almost like putting a sway bar on it. Been hauling a 4500? lb Arctic Fox TC on a 2500 Mega Cab for years now. Felling wedges on the overload spring, big sway bar and about 50psi in bags. 40 if i want it more solid (but sags past level) 50 for level and 60 if hauling the boat (too much air for no trailer though)
JimmyN is right, helping the on road body roll is hurting the off road performance. Think about it.

Have fun campin!
 
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IN MY OPINION Above all else with a slide-in camper, you need to find a way to get a rear sway bar installed.

Fixed it for you. The “need” for a rear swaybar is totally subjective. If I put a stripped down Fourwheel Camper on a dually, I sure as hell don’t need a sway bar. If I put a 4500 lb 10’ hardside with slides on a single rear wheel (#1, I’m an idiot) I probably need a swaybar. It is totally case by case. I have a 2700 lb 9’6” camper on my 3500 srw and have been running legally and without ANY sway issues for decades and 100,000s of miles.
 

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Fixed it for you. The “need” for a rear swaybar is totally subjective. If I put a stripped down Fourwheel Camper on a dually, I sure as hell don’t need a sway bar. If I put a 4500 lb 10’ hardside with slides on a single rear wheel (#1, I’m an idiot) I probably need a swaybar. It is totally case by case. I have a 2700 lb 9’6” camper on my 3500 srw and have been running legally and without ANY sway issues for decades and 100,000s of miles.
You didn't 'fix' anything. I even prefeaced what you quoted with the acronym "IMO" thereby directly stating that it was specifically my opinion.

My opinion is also based on years of firsthand experience owning slide-in campers on both SRW and DRW trucks. The campers were large and heavy and always benefited greatly from the addition of a rear sway bar. But that is all neither here nor there since we are discussing how this pertains to the OP's case and not any other case. In the OP's very first post he specifically stated that he had a slide-in camper and his truck rocked around more than he liked with it installed and he did not have a rear sway bar installed. Therefore the prudent thing to do really is to install a rear sway bar since that is the most effective means of reducing and controlling sway above the other modifications pondered in this thread. It is reasonable to suggest, in this specific case, that installing a rear sway bar would be beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
dsldude, you're on the right track, although you have to temper your expectations with the actual conditions. You state 2200lb "dry" camper, which means you have no idea how much it weighs. Snapshot in your avatar and years of having truck campers, your 2200lb camper is probably 3500lbs min. 2200lbs wouldn't require any of the suspension upgrades.
The other expectation is that this top heavy truck being humped by a white whale will somehow acceptably drive on "jeep roads" which it shouldn't due to the weight and center of gravity.
Also you've upgraded all kinds of stuff and left off the most important part, rear sway bar.
You now have more than enough suspension, maybe more than needed with helper springs and Timbrens. It ain't going to get any better without a sway bar. Period.
Also exaggerating your body roll is not engaging the lower overload.
Wedge the lower overload spring to the leaf pack and it will be almost like putting a sway bar on it. Been hauling a 4500? lb Arctic Fox TC on a 2500 Mega Cab for years now. Felling wedges on the overload spring, big sway bar and about 50psi in bags. 40 if i want it more solid (but sags past level) 50 for level and 60 if hauling the boat (too much air for no trailer though)
JimmyN is right, helping the on road body roll is hurting the off road performance. Think about it.

Have fun campin!
I have the overloads wedged. It is night and day fire she, but still rocks n rolls in rocky bits where my buddies nearly stock 06 duramax appears to be very stable. Similar setups on our trucks as well. No sway on his either. Just bags.
 

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I have the overloads wedged. It is night and day fire she, but still rocks n rolls in rocky bits where my buddies nearly stock 06 duramax appears to be very stable. Similar setups on our trucks as well. No sway on his either. Just bags.
I've only hauled he campers on the 07 Dodge, so no direct comparison.
Only real difference between it and GM is front coils vs torsion bars. Maybe torsion bars control body roll much better?
 

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You didn't 'fix' anything. I even prefeaced what you quoted with the acronym "IMO" thereby directly stating that it was specifically my opinion.

My opinion is also based on years of firsthand experience owning slide-in campers on both SRW and DRW trucks. The campers were large and heavy and always benefited greatly from the addition of a rear sway bar. But that is all neither here nor there since we are discussing how this pertains to the OP's case and not any other case. In the OP's very first post he specifically stated that he had a slide-in camper and his truck rocked around more than he liked with it installed and he did not have a rear sway bar installed. Therefore the prudent thing to do really is to install a rear sway bar since that is the most effective means of reducing and controlling sway above the other modifications pondered in this thread. It is reasonable to suggest, in this specific case, that installing a rear sway bar would be beneficial.
I did fix it. If you read the subsequent posts, you’d realize his sway issue is when OFF-ROAD, and as discussed, a swaybar would actually INCREASE the rocking off-road. And I also stated (agreeing with you) that in the case of large/heavy campers, a sway bar is a good addition. You stated that for ANY slide-in camper a swaybar is the best option. I pointed out that it was unnecessary for light weight campers.

I’ll see you at the bike racks after school I guess? 😜
 
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Discussion Starter #56
The timbrens help a lot, but they are rough as all get out on washboard roads.
 

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The timbrens help a lot, but they are rough as all get out on washboard roads.
I have the same feelings after camping this weekend myself. I'm going to try lowering tire pressure to 25-30 for the dirt. What tire pressures are you running?
 

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Discussion Starter #58
80 all around with the camper. I don't carry a compressor so lowering that is not an option.
 

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Yeah yours is much heavier than mine so you might not even want to. For what it's worth, I got a Smittybilt portable compressor for about $150 and it works awesome. Lifetime warranty too.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Nice. I am mounting up some falken at3w tires soon. They may soften it up a little as they aren't quite as stiff as my toyo mts. All in all, im happier with the less sway. Still could use some help. Now i have injector issues so putting this on hold. Dodge life! 🤬
 
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