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You may save $3 on running less tubing, but have to spend more than that for the T.
If they're plumbed separately and you want an onboard compressor, how do you do that?

Do you need two compressors? Two gauges?

I would think so.

If you're gonna run them separately, don't you have to fill and empty them manually?? Not, that that's a major problem but some like the convenence of pushing a button on the dash.

When my buddy pushed the button on his dash to deflate them, it vented into the cab and stunk the place up.

He was pulling a massive fiver so I think that's a different process. Having to crawl under the nose of the RV to manually fill and ventilate the bags would kinda suck, IMO.

So, again IMHO, it seems that some applications are more gooder tied together and some aren't
 

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"What I have learned. . .
A light duty truck like a SRW Ram 3500 really isn't enough of a vehicle for truck camper duty, even a small camper like mine overloads the little Ram. "

Whatever....this whole thread sounds like a typical thread from RVnet where the geritol crowd is all now afraid to use a truck for what a truck was meant for, either because the internet was invented and they're too impressionable, or because they have forgotten what they used to do in years past with far "less truck" under their @ss than any of the newer trucks.

To the OP, I use home made lower stable loads made out of felling wedges, when hauling the TC. Combined with air bags in my case because electrojake would have a coronary if he passed my 4500lb camper on an old 2500 Ram!
Point is, if you want to try lower stable loads, you can basically try them for free. Slap some temporary wedges in there and see how she rides.
 
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"What I have learned. . .
A light duty truck like a SRW Ram 3500 really isn't enough of a vehicle for truck camper duty, even a small camper like mine overloads the little Ram. "

Whatever....this whole thread sounds like a typical thread from RVnet where the geritol crowd is all now afraid to use a truck for what a truck was meant for, either because the internet was invented and they're too impressionable, or because they have forgotten what they used to do in years past with far "less truck" under their @ss than any of the newer trucks.

To the OP, I use home made lower stable loads made out of felling wedges, when hauling the TC. Combined with air bags in my case because electrojake would have a coronary if he passed my 4500lb camper on an old 2500 Ram!
Point is, if you want to try lower stable loads, you can basically try them for free. Slap some temporary wedges in there and see how she rides.
Believe it or not, it's really not the 'geritol crowd'. In my experience, it's most often millenials.

Millenials are more prone to follow rules just because they're rules. They don't need to understand them, they just obey. Befehl ist Befehl. It's how they were indoctrinated, er, er, eduated in school.

Boomers are more likely, much more likely, to say , "Screw you! My truck, I'll do what I want!"

Not always. But as a percentage of people who actually own RVs, my sense of it has always been it's more likely to be millenials and maybe a few Gen Xers with some Boomers thrown in simply because our age group owns the vast majority of the big RVs.

Boomers like me been around the block way too many times to worry about written rules. They're for other people. ;)
 

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If they're plumbed separately and you want an onboard compressor, how do you do that?

Do you need two compressors? Two gauges?

If you're gonna run them separately, don't you have to fill and empty them manually?? Not, that that's a major problem but some like the convenence of pushing a button on the dash.
One compressor, one tank. And one controller. Dirt simple.
And with height sensors, there's not really a need to ever do anything other than to turn the compressor on, once.
 

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yup on coils and yup on the ground, similar to how us boomers did it back in the day lol have installed quite a few leaf helper bags as well.
 

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To each their own. I'm just sharing my opinion and experience that plumbing the bags separately is not necessary.

For plumbing together like me buy this kit

If you want to plumb separately buy this kit. It is about $100 more.
 
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For plumbing together like me buy this kit

If you want to plumb separately buy this kit. It is about $100 more.
Why buy either one? That's a marginal compressor, there's no tank, and what the heck good does the gauge do?
Whether a single or dual system, it'd be better to source quality components.
 

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Why buy either one? That's a marginal compressor, there's no tank, and what the heck good does the gauge do?
Whether a single or dual system, it'd be better to source quality components.
Why do you need a tank?
 

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Why buy either one? That's a marginal compressor, there's no tank, and what the heck good does the gauge do?
Whether a single or dual system, it'd be better to source quality components.
Because all its doing is airing up two very small air bags to 55psi? It does so within 10-15 seconds so its plenty of compressor for this application. No tank needed since this compressor is only for filling the bags. I like to have control over the bags instead of an auto-level lever etc. Plus that is one less part to fail. If I wanted to install a 10 gallon tank, run air tools, air up tires etc I would have gone with a much heavier duty air compressor. That is not what I wanted to do so I kept it simple.

That kit included a gauge and control switch all in one. My uncle had one before me and I just really like the fit and finish of it.
 
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Why do you need a tank?
It cuts down on compressor startups. Not needed, but nice to have, just like you would have at least a bladder tank on your well, or after your pressure pump.
And if the compressor craps out, a tank can keep the system functional. Maybe by adding air to the tank if it's a long trip.

Because all its doing is airing up two very small air bags to 55psi? It does so within 10-15 seconds so its plenty of compressor for this application. No tank needed since this compressor is only for filling the bags. I like to have control over the bags instead of an auto-level lever etc.
I prefer to be able to use an air system for more than keeping pressure in the springs.
Also, a good controller will allow picking maybe three ride heights, dump the springs, etc.
But yes, it can fail. If so, I would revert to manual filling until I could fix what broke.
 

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Hi, for many years I used my 96 2500 SRW for camper hauler with boat or hunting trailer 10.5 Alpenlite had Firestone air bags rancho 5000 shocks 35" tires and small lift and yes was handful to drive I have recently upgraded to a 2018 3500 SRW Laramie with stock tires no lift with Firestone Bags 150 PSI heavy sway bar in rear and the 9000 shocks , new Lance camper for short box but not that much lighter than the old camper might even be heaver with the slide , just wanted to says what a difference its a pleasure to drive now
 

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You guys turned this into a great thread. Lots of interesting stuff got posted. (y)
Now if the OP would have showed up someplace in the last thirty posts I'd feel complete.

-Ej- :giggle:
 

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In an effort to move back on topic:

I have a 3500 SRW that I just put an Arctic Fox 811 on. I have lower stabilloads and Airlift Airbags (with a dual path compressor system) and it handles the weight well. If I had it to do over again I'd go with the 7500lb bags instead of the 5000lb bags just so I didn't have to run them at such high pressures to get back to about level. The two components work well together, the airbags get you back to level and eliminate sag, the stabilloads keep the lower overload springs engaged for a firmer/less sway prone ride.

My setup is between 8-9k on the rear axle (upgrading as we speak to vision hauler 19.5s and properly rated tires) but AF campers are notoriously heavy and mine for some reason seems to be particularly so. Even with that much weight though, this setup works well for me. Just got done with our first cross country roadtrip (4500 miles) and had no issues.
 

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Good lord man... You have between 8 and 9000 Lb on a SRW rear axle?
Your rims (wheels) are only rated at 3500 Lb each!

I have a SRW 3500 and when my rear axle scale weight starts creeping much over 7200 pounds I get out the rosary beads.
Good luck & keep us posted. 🍺
BTW, @TriBeard, the Arctic Fox 811 is a very nice TC.
It has everything you need in a nice compact size. Exactly what a TC should be! (y)
Regards,
-Ej-
 

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I ran Stableloads on my 06 3500 but that truck used the ones that extended the bump stop for the upper overloads. They were good enough that I readjusted my Airaide Aircells (same principle as Timbren) to not even touch the axle until I hit a bump. Using the Stableloads also improved my ride as they allowed the normal progressive suspension to function more normally while the aircells had a much higher spring rate progression as they loaded so they rode rough under load.

I can't comment on the ones that go in the spring pack on the lower fat leaf that most people call an overload. That leaf is NOT an overload. It is what gives the spring pack the progressive spring rate which is why the Stableload can work. When a leaf spring is shortened the spring rate increases. As the spring compress against this large leaf it shortens the amount of spring that can flex which progressively raises the spring rate. By adding the stable load you are effectively shortening the spring which raises the spring rate sooner.

For sway control, the further you can move the springs out board the better sway control you will get. When I bought my 18 with Factory Air, I had more perceived sway than I had with my 06 even though I moved from a SRW to a DRW. This is because the air bags are inboard of the frame rather than outboard. On the 18 I had to add a Roadmaster Swaybar (Helwig Bigwig would work just as well) to have the sway control that the Stableloads provided on the 06.

For hauling a top heavy load like a truck camper, the stableloads are a big help in my experience with the disclaimer I haven't actually used the models that go on the lower large leaf.
 
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Having Lower StableLoads, Airbags, and Add-a-Leafs I learned that the StableLoads were by far the best help of all three. (y)
It showed me that heavy payload robbing after-market suspension gadgetry cant come close to simply having a truck that's capable of carrying the load in the first place, or having a proper spring-pack built and installed (which kinda' brings us right back around to the obvious need of a heavier truck).

@lpennock, I dont blame FCA for my truck's payload problems. My camper certification gives me a MAX load of 1301 pounds and my camper weighs about 3800 when fully loaded.

If you have a RAM it probably (hopefully?) has a truck camper certification. The camper certification weight is typically 1/3 (one third) of the total posted TREAD Act sticker payload.

As for my own SRW 3500 I have a 3800 pound camper stuffed onto a truck that's only rated for 1301 Lb.
When disaster strikes I'm pretty much on my own. I certainly cant blame FCA.

In my case. . .
Being over the camper rating,
and over the payload rating,
and over the rear axle GAWR rating,
. . .has got to come at a price eventually.


-Ej-
 
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Good lord man... You have between 8 and 9000 Lb on a SRW rear axle?
Your rims (wheels) are only rated at 3500 Lb each!

I have a SRW 3500 and when my rear axle scale weight starts creeping much over 7200 pounds I get out the rosary beads.
Good luck & keep us posted. 🍺
BTW, @TriBeard, the Arctic Fox 811 is a very nice TC.
It has everything you need in a nice compact size. Exactly what a TC should be! (y)
Regards,
-Ej-
Yup, that weight was unexpected and also made me super nervous. I’d expected between 7 and 8 and had gotten a set of the 4080lb per tire rated tires and was good with being a little over on my wheel rating. I wasn’t good with 1k over even the tires. Hence my upgrade to 19.5s. I’ve got a set of vision haulers on there now and a set of falken bi850 tires, so I’m rated to 9k on the wheels and 10k on the axle and tires. That’s a safety margin I’m more comfortable with.

Idk what they’re putting in the new campers to be so heavy. I have a megacab but empty I scaled at about 3500 on the rear axle so idk what makes the camper 5k or more but something must. We had a week and a half worth of food and clothes but not too much random crap.

I only have about 100 miles on the new tires yet but so far unloaded they don’t seem much worse than the 4080lb rated e tires at 80psi. They are much narrower and so there are some compromises there with snow and sand traction if you need that but I don’t do much that requires even 4wd. beyond forest service roads and the like just makes me too nervous with the size of rig I have. Stability is vastly improved. Even just being in the camper at a quick stop or whatever you get much less sway as you move around inside. It was shocking the difference to me.
 
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Right now I’m at a NETCJ truck campers rally. I should show up at tonight’s meeting wearing my bright yellow CAT Scale tee shirt.🤣

The truth of the matter is that most of us SRW campers are way over weight. Hell, one of my friends here showed up with his NorthernLite 10-2 on a bran-new F450 and he’s right at his max payload. BTW, NorthernLite’s are known for their light weight.

Putting a truck-camper on a 5500 is somewhat common. Forum member @Bedlam has one. He hits the scales at 16,000 pounds. Considering my dinky shortbed Arrow-U is 12,340 pounds, his weight is very believable.

@TriBeard your setup sounds like it will be very safe and stable. Happy camping and thanks for your post.🍺
 
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Yup, that weight was unexpected and also made me super nervous. I’d expected between 7 and 8 and had gotten a set of the 4080lb per tire rated tires and was good with being a little over on my wheel rating. I wasn’t good with 1k over even the tires. Hence my upgrade to 19.5s. I’ve got a set of vision haulers on there now and a set of falken bi850 tires, so I’m rated to 9k on the wheels and 10k on the axle and tires. That’s a safety margin I’m more comfortable with.

Idk what they’re putting in the new campers to be so heavy. I have a megacab but empty I scaled at about 3500 on the rear axle so idk what makes the camper 5k or more but something must. We had a week and a half worth of food and clothes but not too much random crap.
That does seem abnormally heavy. I've had 2 AF860s 1 aluminum frame, 1 wood, now and afaik, still same basic size/layout/structure as the 811s, save for the rounded roof on newer models.
Did you weigh yours or just surmising? I haven't scaled mine, but calculated pressure required to return to normal ride height on bags (I dont run at that height, rather level to keep springs engaged) and came up with 4000-4500lbs which is "average" of those who have weighed their setups.
Either way, they're heavy.
What pressure do you need on the 6" dia bags to level up? Interested as I'd expect the 4th Gen 3500s to have considerably higher spring rate than my 2500 3rd gen.
 

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Right now I’m at a NETCJ truck campers rally. I should show up at tonight’s meeting wearing my bright yellow CAT Scale tee shirt.🤣

The truth of the matter is that most of us SRW campers are way over weight. Hell, one of my friends here showed up with his NorthernLite 10-2 on a bran-new F450 and he’s right at his max payload. BTW, NorthernLite’s are known for their light weight.
🍺
Card carrying weight police in uniform! LOL
Yes, unless a person is "over-trucked" for most full size campers, they will bust out of the OEM payload "rating."
Your example is a perfect example. Assuming F450 p/u with "de-rated" 14k gvwr. A NL 10-2 in no way maxes out a F450 p/u except on paper, or if you carry bags of rocks!
 
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