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rear end issues?

725 Views 3 Replies 3 Participants Last post by  Espeefan
So the other day i was stuck in the snow with my awesome stock tires and noticed only only tire was spinning in my LS diff, but as soon as i put the truck in drive the axle chatters and both spin till i give it a little more throttle.... is this normal? The truck will still light both of them up on the pavement tho?
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So the other day i was stuck in the snow with my awesome stock tires and noticed only only tire was spinning in my LS diff, but as soon as i put the truck in drive the axle chatters and both spin till i give it a little more throttle.... is this normal? The truck will still light both of them up on the pavement tho?
These rear ends are designed in a way that they don't usually grip on both sides at first. It kind of works up to transfering traction to the other tire. You get an initial spin from lose of traction and then the power starts to transfer over to the tire not spinning. Unlike the older style that was on or off with no in between. You can softly apply the e-brake to get them to grab a little sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok but mine grabs a bit at the start then stops once a gun it a bit, but if i just step on it they both spin maybe i am just expecting to much? it just doesnt sound right when it locks in when the wheels start to spin. sorry i am not to good at explaining it
 

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These new trucks use a torque biasing limited slip type differential, and not the old clutch pack limited slip designs. Instead of clutch packs, which use the friction of the clutch discs to maintain an even 50/50 torque distribution (the clutch packs can be over powered - it is called a limited slip for a reason), these torque biasing differentials use gears that transfer the torque from a spinning wheel to the opposite wheel that is not slipping. So until the transfer gears can do their job, you may get some one wheel action. In order for the gears to transfer, it may take a half a turn of the slipping wheel. Perfectly normal operation. The benefit of the torque biasing limited slip type differential is that there are no clutch packs to wear out. The differential is also more adaptive, meaning it can perform better in some situations then a clutch pack differential, especially when a clutch pack differential experiences a drastic traction difference between two wheels. Clutches will be over powered, while a torque biasing limited slip type differential will still send power to the wheel with more grip, most often achieving a perfect 50/50 split in those conditions that clutch packs may not.
 
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