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Ok Diesels need alot of air. Nitrous NO2 seperates into Nitrogen and O2 in the cylinder so you have more O2 so you can add more fuel,Well Instead of Nitrous y not use Pure Oxygen? Diesels dont have to worry about detenation. But what would happen if you filled a Nitrous bottle up with pure O2 and used it like normal? The more air the lower EGTs rite and the more fuel you could burn? I know there is something that would make this a bad idea because you dont see people doing it but why?
 

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The nitrogen helps to cool the combustion.
 

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I've unfortunately heard of fatalities occurring from guys transporting welding gasses like oxygen and acetalyne - especially if they are stored in an enclosed service body. I believe both nitrous oxide and oxygen have the same DOT Hazard Class (2.2), but oxygen presents a much greater explosion hazard compared to nitrous given an ignition source (both accelerate combusion, obviously!). Granted I don't know anything about how these nitrous systems are built (in terms of the lines, valves, and safety standards etc), but for safety reasons I would not put pure oxygen in your nitrous system...even though your reasoning is sound....
 

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As long as you got the oxygen pressurized enough to be liquid, it would have a greater charge cooling affect as nitrous because O2 is a smaller molecule than N2O.

But since it's a smaller molecule, I think that would mean that you would need to put it under more pressure than you would nitrous? I got an F in Chemistry and have never taken thermodynamics... If you need to put oxygen under 2000 or 3000 PSI to be a liquid, you are getting into some pretty heavy solenoids and lines.

By introducing more oxygen into the intake chamber than normal or than with-nitrous, it would burn more fuel in the chamber. That could decrease EGT's if you were suffering from afterburning, or it could increase EGT's just by making more power. But the oxygen-adding effect is minor compared to the charge cooling affect, unless you're going crazy. If you're going crazy, than nothing is holding you back except balls.

Because there is the safety consideration, which has been what's caused oxygen bottles to be outlawed by the NHRA... Nitrous isn't flammable, oxygen is flammable. Very flammable.
 

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Oxygen can light off the fuel too quick...uncontrolled combustion, real parts breaking, "run over yer crankshaft" detonation.
The oxygen in nitrous oxide doesn't become available for oxidation until after the combustion process begins...the heat or pressure of dis-association, at which point it'll help to process (thanks Smokey, RIP) any yet unlit fuel.
 

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As a chemist all I want to say is "think Space Shuttle Challenger". O2 in pure gaseous (or liquid) form is bad joojoo (with or without an obvious ignition source!). Nitrous is wonderfully stable until you compress AND heat the hoowee out of it.
 
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As a chemist all I want to say is "think Space Shuttle Challenger". O2 in pure gaseous (or liquid) form is bad joojoo (with or without an obvious ignition source!). Nitrous is wonderfully stable until you compress AND heat the hoowee out of it.
Exactly. The reason NO2 is used is because it is stable. O2 will burst into flame when it comes in contact with oil. Diesel fuel is an oil. So is the lube oil in the turbo. Willing to risk it?

Don't use pure O2 to fuel an engine.
 

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Button

nitrous oxide seperates into nitrogen (inert) and oxygen at above five or six hundred degrees. That is why it is more stable and safe and useful. It can still do horrible things to an engine. I had a friend in highschool that ran the button on his 442 and he ate alot of pistons. The blue sparks out the pipe looked kinda cool though. Pure o2 would be dangerous overkill:headbang:
Ps. I know the post is kinda late but hey.
 

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x2 on the pure oxygen + oil = kaboom!

Ever wonder why the gauges used on oxygen tanks say in big letters DO NOT OIL!!!

Now, granted the turbo wasnt puking oil out the seals and the residual ammount of oil left in the cylinder wasnt enough for it to spontaniously combust. It probably would work.

Since a diesel operates on detonation and thus the fuel is injected near the desired combustion time, the reaction between the oxygen and fuel is likely not an issue.


But, still not a good idea...
 

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You could use the phrase TO MUCH OF A GOOD THING.

Your pure gas O2, like the home health care bottles would be the only ones i would try but like i said above. Other people have said it about the molecules and crap like that. Its not as stable with out the inert gas with it.

Your liquid O2 would be a BIG NO NO. They are somewhat right with the spontaneous combustion. It would freeze the oil (hydrocarbon) and you would have 2 of the 3 sides of the fire tetrahegon(sp). All you would need after that is a spart of actually a shock to the O2 and fuel to make it detonate and with the saturation of the fuel with the O2 any bouncing around in the intake plenum could make it detonate.
 

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I thought the last leg of the tetrahedron was the firebug chief! Sorry, couldn't help myself!:hehe: Actually all the legs will be there, no matter what, bottle or no.

I think another issue with O2 is that it requires SERIOUS pressure to hold much in a tank. Nitrous, I think, needs much less pressure, and I think goes liquid pretty readily. This means if you get a rupture, it's not like an O2 tank (or SCBA) that will blow a car right off the ground, but more like a pop and liquid pouring out like a propane tank rupture.
 

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:shock:I would add its just like pressing that funny lever on the torch.Melt down
 

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Yes it can be done but only a marginal improvement can be obtained SAFELY. It is a simple oxygen enrichment of the air entering the engine. With that added oxygen, you must add fuel. That is why nitrous and propane work so well. They add oxygen and fuel at the same time. Propane by its flammable petroleum nature and nitrous by "nitrating" the fuel present (think nitro) though more fuel must still be added.
 

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Oxygen is not flammable. It is an accelerant. This means that when fire is present the oxygen causes it to burn much faster. That is why the bottle is green, not red. Take a looh at oxy/acetalene torch. Hot flame, then hit the oxygen and it really gets hot for cutting.
 

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Oxygen is not flammable. It is an accelerant. This means that when fire is present the oxygen causes it to burn much faster. That is why the bottle is green, not red. Take a looh at oxy/acetalene torch. Hot flame, then hit the oxygen and it really gets hot for cutting.
Its not heat that it causes (since oxygen is not flamable its not going to 'add more fuel to the fire'

An oxy/acet cutting torch works by the reaction of pure oxygen with the heated metal (rapid oxidation)
 

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the biggest problem is when pure ox is compressed. big boom! it will blow your head off the truck seen it done on a gas motor was not pretty!! If you look at the pecentage of ox in regular air,i think its about 28% not real sure thou. then look at nitirous I think its like 45% so if you add 100% ox its just to much like someone stated earlyer its not stable thats why they use no2 cause its contained untill the combustion takes place .
 

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Yes it can be done but only a marginal improvement can be obtained SAFELY. It is a simple oxygen enrichment of the air entering the engine. With that added oxygen, you must add fuel. That is why nitrous and propane work so well. They add oxygen and fuel at the same time. Propane by its flammable petroleum nature and nitrous by "nitrating" the fuel present (think nitro) though more fuel must still be added.
Nitrogen in the nitrous oxide is not a fuel. It is inert. The "nitro" you ar thinking about is nitromethane which is made by treating propane with nitric acid. The oxygen in the nitromethane molecule ( CH3NO2) allows for combustion with no outside oxidiser like air or nitrous oxide. Nitrogen by itself is inert, that is why it is ok to send through your engine. You are right in that it still requires you to add more fuel. That is why propane works well in compression engines as a fuel additive. The hydrocarbon molecule in propane is really simple and burns really easily. Then you don't need to run bigger injectors or a hot chip for more power. You still have to pay for the gas though, and that might cost more in the long run than chipping your truck or adding bigger sticks to burn more diesel fuel.
On a side note, the rocket motor in spaceship one used tire (thats right tire) rubber as a fuel and liquid nitrous oxide as an oxidiser. And they got into Space.:headbang:
 

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Nitrous Oxide is N2O it is NOT NO2. Thus when using N2O you are adding a gas which is 33% oxygen, versus normal air which is 21%.

We know that increasing oxygen means you can increase the fueling. We know this because with no boost from the turbo we can blow black smoke, and once boost comes up the smoke clears up (maybe not completely for some, they just need more air).

Nitrous allows more fuel to be burned before the boost comes up. Although I have not played with it, I believe the progressive nitrous systems reduce Nitrous as boost increases. Thus allowing more pressure and heat in the cylinder, which equates power, which in turn would speed up the time for the turbo to be at full boost.

NOW running pure O2 would be good in theory, However could create a very bad consequency, because it would create an extreme oxygen rich enviornment and would be very volatile.
N2O is safe because the O does not seperate from the N until 575 degrees, by that point it is already in the chamber where you want combustion. Thus the reason you dont have to worry about Nitrous exploding in a diesel like with a gas engine. NO SPARK.

SO Nitrous is pretty safe in Diesels, HOWEVER can and probably will break parts if not used correctly.
 
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