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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so I have been fighting my steering for about a month and a half now and its still really sloppy. So far I have done the 08+ steering upgrade, dual steering stabilizers, checked the ball joints, alignment, and the steering box stabilizers. What would you recommend next? Can you tighten these steering boxes like you could on the older cars on top of the steering box?
 

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Yes you can but do not over tighten as it will be worse than you have now. Make sure the wheels are straight ahead and tighten it a little at a time and then test drive.
 

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Adjustment must be done correctly. It is not that difficult just time consuming. It can be done on the truck (flat rated) but is not recommended. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. :)
ADJUSTMENT
CAUTION: Steering gear must be adjusted in the proper order. If adjustments are not performed in order, gear damage and improper steering response may result.
NOTE: Adjusting the steering gear in the vehicle is not recommended. Remove gear from the vehicle and drain the fluid. Then mount gear in a vise to perform adjustments.

(1) Remove the steering gear from the vehicle
(2) Mount the gear carefully into a soft-jawed vise.
CAUTION: Do not overtighten the vise on the gear case. This may affect the adjustment
(3) Hold the steering gear upside down over a drain pan and rotate the input shaft back and forth several times lock-to-lock to discharge the fluid from the steering gear
(4) Rotate the input shaft to the left stop and then back-off approximately 45 degrees. Using an inchpound torque wrench on the input shaft, record the peak torque required to slowly and evenly rotate the input shaft clockwise 1⁄2 turn (180 degrees) starting
from the 45 degree position. This peak torque reading is the preload torque. The preload torque must be within 2 - 10 in-lbs.
(5) Rotate the input shaft to its center of travel (approximately 1.5 turns from either stop). Place the torque wrench on the input shaft with the handle in the vertical position. Rotate the torque wrench slowly and evenly 1⁄4 turn (90 degrees) each side of center and record the peak torque measure on or near center. This total on-center torque reading must be 5 - 9 in-lbs higher than the previously measured preload torque without exceeding a total of 17 in-lbs. The value of the total on-center minus the preload torque is defined as the meshload torque
(6) If required, adjust the on-center torque by loosening the adjuster screw lock nut and turning the adjuster screw until the total on-center and meshload torque readings fall within the specified values. Turn the adjuster screw clockwise to increase and counterclockwise to decrease the torque reading. While holding the adjuster screw in place, tighten the lock nut to 31 N·m (23 ft. lbs.).
(7) Re-check the preload and on-center torque readings.
(8) Install pitman arm on the steering gear
(9) Reinstall steering gear to the vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Adjustment must be done correctly. It is not that difficult just time consuming. It can be done on the truck (flat rated) but is not recommended. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. :)
ADJUSTMENT
CAUTION: Steering gear must be adjusted in the proper order. If adjustments are not performed in order, gear damage and improper steering response may result.
NOTE: Adjusting the steering gear in the vehicle is not recommended. Remove gear from the vehicle and drain the fluid. Then mount gear in a vise to perform adjustments.

(1) Remove the steering gear from the vehicle
(2) Mount the gear carefully into a soft-jawed vise.
CAUTION: Do not overtighten the vise on the gear case. This may affect the adjustment
(3) Hold the steering gear upside down over a drain pan and rotate the input shaft back and forth several times lock-to-lock to discharge the fluid from the steering gear
(4) Rotate the input shaft to the left stop and then back-off approximately 45 degrees. Using an inchpound torque wrench on the input shaft, record the peak torque required to slowly and evenly rotate the input shaft clockwise 1⁄2 turn (180 degrees) starting
from the 45 degree position. This peak torque reading is the preload torque. The preload torque must be within 2 - 10 in-lbs.
(5) Rotate the input shaft to its center of travel (approximately 1.5 turns from either stop). Place the torque wrench on the input shaft with the handle in the vertical position. Rotate the torque wrench slowly and evenly 1⁄4 turn (90 degrees) each side of center and record the peak torque measure on or near center. This total on-center torque reading must be 5 - 9 in-lbs higher than the previously measured preload torque without exceeding a total of 17 in-lbs. The value of the total on-center minus the preload torque is defined as the meshload torque
(6) If required, adjust the on-center torque by loosening the adjuster screw lock nut and turning the adjuster screw until the total on-center and meshload torque readings fall within the specified values. Turn the adjuster screw clockwise to increase and counterclockwise to decrease the torque reading. While holding the adjuster screw in place, tighten the lock nut to 31 N·m (23 ft. lbs.).
(7) Re-check the preload and on-center torque readings.
(8) Install pitman arm on the steering gear
(9) Reinstall steering gear to the vehicle
Does it really take that much work?
 

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Does it really take that much work?
Pulled it right from the Dodge service manual.
I didn't say it was easy to do it RIGHT.
doing it wrong gets you knowhere. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does anyone have an easy way to get the pitman arm off?
 
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