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At 15 mpg he must be driving very fast to need fuel every 3-4 hours.

80% capacity max range = 21-gallons. Agreed, @Jimmy N. 315 divided by 21 = 14.85. He’s averaging about 72-74.

Likely more a bladder thing (rest stops at two-hours a better plan; stay relaxed) as stepping down on throttle a side effect of discomfort. Stopping more often than he needs to given has no daily trip plan.

15’s my average across the flatter parts of the South with 35’ travel trailer (17k+ GCW). Why should I want an ED? (where GCW would be 15k or so). I’d have to leave out 1,200-lbs of gear permanently on-board, etc.

ED should be at 18+ (nice looking trailer. If a supported tarp could go from over front shield onto car hood that’d help)


To look at Fair Rate of Speed + Low Risk & High MPG Trip Plan:

At a 55-mph dispatch rate (higher than big trucks) where all trip hours are accounted (not just drive time), a hypothetical 2,088-mile trip Fort Worth to Charlotte, NC roundtrip is 38- hours.

(3.5) days of 600/miles daily pace inside an 11-hr drive time (12-14/hr trip time).

— Run at 74 doesn’t change drive time enough to matter given on-road penalties of IH-20 traffic volume (plus damned Atlanta twice) versus increased rate of fuel burn & vehicle component wear coupled to unacceptable risk.

There’s only so far one can go in a day. Over 3.5-days (four, to allow for problems) so look at the planning limits.


There’s not much open road that route versus twenty-five or thirty years ago.

If I want to run the KW “fast” I have to plan so as to get past Atlanta at the best hours (one-hour planned minimum penalty even at 0300) so as to keep daily & Trip Average MPH highest (correlates to best consistent fuel burn).

— Atlanta (like D/FW) its a window 0900-1300 to hit one side of the metro 75-miles out from city center and expect to make it across expeditiously. (Otherwise past 2300 till 0400).

Atlanta to Charlotte on IH-85 is one of the worst stretches of Interstate in the US for traffic.

The round-trip is going to take 3.5-4.0/days no matter at what speed I park the cruise control.

Wanna make time?

— Leave early & stop early. Repeat daily. 0400-1600 works (except Bos-Wash Corridor where it’s 0100-1300).

— Traffic volume (peaks nationally 1100-2100) will make or break any plan. Get the miles in early. Ask any truck driver about the importance of the first 4-5/hours on the road.

I was planning that trip — done many, many times — I’d use:

(East of Dallas, DUKES for BBQ and/or Rest Area MM 538 just to get out of town); then,

1). Petro at MM9 Shreveport, LA
2). Rest Area at MM 96 Choudrant

3). LOVES at MM15 Vicksburg, MS
4). Rest Area MM90 Forest, MS

5). T/A at MM77 Tuscaloosa, AL
6). Rest Area MM84

7). LOVES MM205 Heflin, AL

8). Petro MM160 Carnesville, GA
(An absolute point in my plans: E of ATL t’s Indian Territory all the way)
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9). Rest Area MM2 Grover NC

Tuscaloosa to Carnesville = 261-miles (315-mile max towing range). That’s the leg where the stop points (uncrowded) are crucial. Day or Night.

It’s only 150-miles Carnesville to Charlotte.

300-mile roundtrip plus business
(big truck it’s live unload and re-load). There’s the short day of the trip (back to same Petro; earliest departure to get past ATL in the dark).

— Otherwise space the rest area stops at about 2-hours to maintain alertness. 4.5-5/hrs for fuel.

This ain’t rocket science. But it pays cash money.

A). Plan the trip legs with addresses into GPS.
B). Execute each leg separately.
C).
Have stop point as last.

MPG Penalty (assuming good plan) are the intervals off CC to exit and do business, then to re-enter Interstate. (From CC “Off” to CC “On”).

The later the daily start the worse the discrepancy between CC set speed and actual average being made due to traffic volume.


Further:

A) It’s never legal to travel in the left lane of a US Interstate. It’s only for a single pass.

B). It’s flat illegal to block access to the passing lane.

C). Right-of-Way is to travel-lane only (right lane).

—,Short version of above is that if I need to come over and traffic is illegally traveling in the passing-only lane, is illegally tail-gating, and thereby illegally blocking lane access (ROW) . . .

. . I’ve no compunction about coming over to the passing lane — occupied or not — as it’s a near-certainty the crash that’s occurred ahead and is having a chain effect on drivers ahead of me who’ve failed to maintain separation distance adequate to the road, the weather and the traffic volume I’ll rear end at a high speed

If you’re in the left lane with three strikes already against you . . you don’t exist for what’s necessary at that point. (Same as operating without insurance though the other guys fault; it’s entirely you shouldn’t have been on the road at all).

— Moving to left lane the very best choice as to incurred liability. And, if you think I’ll sacrifice myself, guess again, as the law is also clear about that.

“Skill” cited will getcha laughed out of the room. The statistical spread between best and worst drivers on the planet is minuscule. It’s the roads, the laws and the conditions.

The conditional increase of less and less intelligent drivers plus those vaxxed have taken death & serious injury rates right now to their highest level in a decade (when cars & roads weren’t as good; with lower traffic volumes).

Being trapped against some big trucks with low-skill, non-heritage “Americans” or foreign drivers to the right, and then one is ahead & behind others of the same derivation = Can’t Fix Stupid.

It’s just not hard to have low-risk & high-mpg at a fair rate-of-speed to be all three the same thing as conditions dictate limits.

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Funny that you mentioned that, as my first thought was that the guy's Depends don't work as well as they should.

In the winter I do have to make a quick stop along the shoulder every now and then, but when it's warm out I can go longer than my 74 gallon fuel capacity allows me. Which is another reason I want an auxiliary tank.
Correct. Fuel capacity has little to no relation to rest breaks (side of the highway or on ramp doesn’t count). Real breaks of determined length at 2-hour intervals. (Don’t stretch that much).

“Depends” worn because he’s above reasonable travel speed. (Stress).

I’ll be running 67-68/mph and get passed three times in an afternoon by Baby Daddy in balloon-tired, lifted, one-ton with a toyhauler attached. (Same reason; it’s above his skill level . . to which there are no exceptions given that crap rig spec).

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You know that I like to get to where I'm going, even if it's only 450 miles away - in which case I try to make it back the same day.

If it's over 1,300 miles I do generally stop, at least for a couple of hours, before heading back.

An iron-clad 600-mile daily maximum works. The adrenaline high is fun, but no one escapes White Line Fever after 400-miles.

(Why RV’ers have always used : “300-miles or 3-o’clock.)

The speed at which one covers the miles has a barrier of reduced side-vision. It’s like engine rpm calculations against aero penalty. It’s a small window.

— Slower is less tiring (up to daily hours limit).

— Faster burns more energy-per-mile.

Thus both wind up being about the same distance against fatigue.

Instead (generalities first about MPG):

Better Choice: Free Hotel Room

@Alcharger experience

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As long as the fuel is covering the pump, then you're getting better cooling than having part of the pump exposed. It would be interesting to see if your pump(s) are completely covered at 9 - 12 gallons.

Why in big trucks 80% is the actual capacity.

A 120-gl tank is “empty” you’ve burned 95-gallons. Your “reserve to empty” is atop that for conservative planning purposes.

Call those tanks 80-gallon versus 120-gallon and liife is easier.

So use 65% as farthest range to fill. That station is crowded or pumps inoperative you’ve some range left. (160-gl capacity, not 240).

At 7-MPG still 1,000-mile range. You squeeze that a little you’re okay.

But not last 20%.

80% of 35 = 29.

65% is 23.

Pick a number nearer 23 than 29.

25 with mine is 600-solo highway & 350-towing the TT.

Still have up to ten gallons remaining in tank. (5-gls in bed). Neither of those exist.

So it’s best to plan the fuel stops to reflect your historic average (true) as the maximum distance.

300-miles = 1/2-tank solo
175-miles = 1/2 tank towing

Fuel Stop at 300-600 miles (anytime after about six hours drive time).

Or 175-350 towing (about four hours drive time)

— Do trip plan based on location of fuel stop (rural) and accommodating rest breaks (no crowds). Single fuel stop fulfills maximum daily miles.

— Back to my #8915 post I’m going to pick one of the known good choices
on a route as control over stop time past the minimum = Travel Speed.

Next morning pre-dawn I’m going to top off with no one around as I’ll still have above a half-tank in both scenarios. Very short time at diesel islands.

— In the big truck I’ll fill up to carry me the maximum 1.5-2.0/days based on full tanks (plus idle time) and having planned the next fuel buy last night based on the same early AM start. I know already where I’ll stop as fuel was part of that choice (it may or may not be a truck stop; rest area 15-30/miles works fine).

Fuel pump in-tank or out is irrelevant

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Interesting. With my small to large diesel vehicles vehicles, and stationary tanks, and propane tanks, that 80% limit is due to possible thermal expansion.

Many of my smaller diesels have a line marked on the outside of the tank (do not fill above this level), but none of them have anything mentioned about running the tank below 80% of nominal capacity.

Guess they figure that if you're dumb enough to run a tank dry, you'll have some extra work ahead before the engine will fire up again, and probably won't repeat the mistake.
(Nothing like pain pills & insomnia)

That’s reckonings part of it, @Jimmy N.

The other part is being on a slope. (The part that counts).

The below is what I’d teach when a trainer in the South Texas oilfield. These days only trainee is my son. It’s not complete, it’s a slice of mind-set. You might enjoy.

Why companies pay more for experience (or how to better read big truck motivators based on best use of truck details).

1). About Buying Fuel

The tanks themselves may have the fill rotated such that a large expansion area is always present. The capacity stated doesn’t include the expansion area, so depending on filler clock and fuel island slope you may be off 10-15/gals from stated every fill.

I’d choose fuel locations based on correct slope — if all else was good — I could get rear-fill Pete 579 tanks topped with that extra 10-15/gals. (Still space in tank, just not much) Some old-timey joints I could get in more and would burn it off after leaving. That’s the leaker.

30-gals = 24-hrs Idle Time. (Hotel room is cheaper than $150-180 in fuel before being hard on engine that way).

Not many can idle very long any more. (Engine controls; SCR damage cited). However I’ve had 2021s that never got turned off. Bunk Heater is the big change. Cool nights and the truck stops are almost silent.

— Running a big truck out of fuel is a $700-plus service call. Some of the latest have to be towed to dealer (your last day on that job). Airplanes, boats and big trucks are always running low on fuel.

Not any Class 8 Regional running less than 160-gal tanks (twin 80s) nor are OTR running more than 280 (twin 140) to my knowledge. That’s the sweet spot: 120-220 useable.

One firm I worked for we stayed at 8-8.5/mpg (full-on aero & drivetrain to match). I stretched out first tank I ran to almost 3,000-miles, but hit headwinds in the Panhandle and stopped to squeeze in 294-gals as I’d been running 62-MPH as a test. Three 20k loads in a row made high mpg easy.

That there was: “Load the rifle on Sunday and keep firing all week” (as said of first repeating rifles in the Civil War).

Big trucks don’t really burn oil any more than latest pickups. Nor lose coolant. OCI is as much as 60k these days. Pre-trip takes care of checking under hood. And we’d carry company spec oil (zero substitute of brand & spec allowed).

— Was pretty nice in that job not having to buy fuel except every third day. Fill Monday and drive till Wednesday. Repeat on Friday and start over on Monday. (Three weekly fuel stops versus 5-7).

In most of trucking you’ll be filling at least daily. It’s a basic job assumption. Diesel is said to be 8-lbs per gallon roughly but scale it befote and after it’s really 10-lbs gallon.

1,600 to 2,400-lbs of fuel adds up against loads carried. Most OTR tractors I’ve run past five years (new) are at 19,000-lbs with 200-lb driver + 400-lbs gear (a condo equipped with inverter, refrigerator, APU) and max fuel.

Scaling a tractor new to me the first few loads tells me how to adjust my weight distribution hitch . . that’s the definition of a fifth wheel since how much to load Steer Axle as a percentage is crucial to the same things as with a pickup.

--
There’s a short range of adjustment, but you still have to know it. (Secondary consideration is that “closer” is better for aero, but too close makes it ride harder and increases risk of trailer strike).

I’ve been running dry van or reefer past five years. Tanker & other commodities haulers I ran earlier go for lower weight tractors. (Smaller & noisier)

A). Empty reefer rig is 36,000-lbs (with 50-gal diesel tank on trailer)

B). Empty pneumatic tanker rig is 27,000-lbs. Liquid can be higher and I’ve not run compressed gas.

C). Dry van nearer 32k.

D). Flatbed 27k (Headache rack, chains, binders, straps & tarps plus dunnage gets weight on up there).

2). How to Estimate Needed Fuel

Calculations about fuel are harder (experience): have to know general consumption for given conditions.

Example A

I’m out west of DC/Baltimore on IH-81 and know my roundtrip today is 290-310 miles back to this point at Tom’s Brook, VA at the Pilot or Loves using IH-64. An all day affair.

I’ll need 50-gallons to cover that based on known factors. (42-gals is dead-minimum).

I’m sitting just below a half-tank (so just over 100-gals onboard). But really it’s only 80, remember. And that’s if the tank gauge correction is one I have verified.

I need fifty gallons at a reasonable minimum? Hell, I’d better fill up before I head on in. It’s difficult to get fuel from DC to Baltimore (huge time penalty).

In last years Snowmageddon where IH-95 was shut down 24-hrs . . . how’d you Iike to run out of diesel?

Vehicle Automotive tire Infrastructure Motor vehicle Car


Example B

Riding the ice in AR last winter. That’s a victory photograph having made it safely to eastbound IH-40 from IH-30 at Little Rock. Notice no one close ahead of me and west-bound at a stop up ahead.

A few hours back had been sitting & waiting at my overnight rest area smoking cofffee and drinking cigarettes till CB told me fog was clearing on wet roads back west, but early enough to get past Little Rock before the sleepy-heads got moving and front moved in (last nights forecast changed before this morning. Early bird gets worm)

Changed to iced-over at 30/40 interchange with a hellacious wind the barbed wire didn’t slow it down coming from Alberta . . . couldn’t use the elevated bypass across the river (have a CB and use it; idiots using WAZE got trapped up there for hours; their day was over as it started).

— Westbound IH30 shut down in center of Little Rock with a wreck I watched happen. Within minutes ****** onlookers on east-bound side managed to wreck and get that shut as well.

A good CB will crack you up you hear some drivers descriptions of whats happened behind you if you got the ears: “Orale! What, . . ees time to stop for breakfast taco, esse!” I can cuss ‘em but there ain’t nothing as funny as hearing that opening and then their cousins rip ‘em a new one in another language.

Lost an hour getting to Memphis with two wrecks out ahead of this point & time. An expectation per plan.

But the guys parked near me overnight who took off too late wound up having 6-7/wrecks this direction, and lost the whole rest of their day on IH-40 just from L-R to Memphis (the bar none busiest truck road in North America after 80/90 thru Chicago).

HOS is big. Start Early & Stop Early.

The panicky and unprepared had the truck stops at West Memphis jammed as I went thru. In fact there was no way to get into any truckstop or rest area the 180-miles L-R to nearly Jackson, TN. (No safe exit/entrance ramps either as they were iced and full of trucks. So . . gotta take a leak? Hold drivers door open and aim).

— That’s an every nerve-ending for hours kind of morning. Must’ve played this continually in my head the whole way. Jack Teagarden while on-air trading reports with the other hired hands both directions also had radio rigs could get above the threshold.

(Opening of that music hits like adrenaline you get them now-harnessed horses started wheeling around to the front of that freight wagon before starting down the Devils River the rest of the way to the border. Nerve-endings all the way hoping you don’t meet any of the locals). Music that requires electricity to perform can’t produce what’s needed. Nor can the Satan-phone replicate reality. (Demons in both).

Relaxed past Memphis. No more ice.

Made my stop outside Jackson at the world-renowned Exit 87 BBQ for two huge $6 pulled pork sandwiches as I wouldn’t need fuel till Knoxville, TN or Abingdon, VA (weather drove things that day). My stop points depending on how it worked out. One or the other.

I’m now a day ahead of at least one other driver my company loaded same place and time as me.

Note trip odometer. Equates to daily start and fuel purchased just up ahead of my overnight spot. Ground pressure throughout a day another fuel fill consideration. You’d best believe I want every bit of 5,750-lbs on each Steer Axle tire while grossing 77,000-lbs.

1). I know the numbers for this truck.
— I have tandems, fifth wheel & tire pressures set best (tested).

2). I know how it uses fuel. What the fuel gauge is saying versus per-tank trip odometer in use. Can predict.

3). Career experience gives me context to those.

— Winter clothes I got (or, shorts). HVAC use below 50F and above 80F a consideration if trapped. Do same in a pickup, IMO. Maximize all margins by fuel amount and weight.

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Some people don’t realize when you haul for a living, your constantly calculating fuel used and miles made and watching the fuel gauge. Spotting a bullchitter isn’t hard.
One knows the averages.
Against load or terrain or other.

Prediction is not losing your wahoo on something as simple as the fuel cost.

Most of these guys run a few loads long-distance over a years time . . and use the Beer #3 Selective Memory Mode to tell the story.

Just ask them the Annual Average
It’s the only number that counts.

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If I’m figuring mileage from tank to tank. I’ll try park on similar slopes as my fills are on the end of the tanks.
Maybe I should be more clear in the event anyone misunderstood.

1). It’s easy to uncover the fuel pickup in a big truck fuel tank (being on a grade or slope will do it if tank is too low). So don’t get below 20% rated capacity always good advice (oilfield).

— Estimated 50-55/gallons remaining in a pair of 140’s for example is taking wrong chances.

— (7) gallons in a 35-gal CTD factory tank is same position. (Hot, dirty, could uncover).

2). Most every diesel fuel island has a forward down-slope to capture and channel fuel spills. My use of slope past first remark was about filling only.

3). As to tank-to-tank on a big truck I never sweated it much: I just want a consumption number keeps me out of trouble. I call it 6.2-MPG when it’s really 6.8-MPG.

— After a few thousand miles I’ll have better info, and after a year I’ll have actual data.
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I ran out once, after forgetting to switch tanks in the 359.
It was definitely embarrassing to sit on the side of a 2-lane road (without a shoulder) with the hood open, but all I had to do was use the primer pump to get going again.

Would I have made it to a fuel station with the extra five gallons in a can, had the tanks been hooked together in standard configuration? Maybe. But probably not. There was more than one reason for why I separated the tanks' function with four valves.
That this setup allowed a dummy like me to run out of fuel twice as often was only a side effect.

I think you're severely overestimating today's drivers when recommending using a CB radio. They already have their hands full playing with the touch screen.

I could give a damn about the herd. They put on the mask and took the death jab. Didn’t protect wives, elderly parents or children, either, in a spectacular display of moral cowardice. Won’t be around a lot longer.

For the ones still have a mind and a soul, I’d say it louder if I could about the value of an 11-Meter Radio System (AM/SSB).

One wants to know who are his likeliest allies in serious problem-solving while on the road they’ll already be prepared this way.

My experience is that it’s uncanny what happens once a first-rate system is installed.

ANYTONE 5555N II
Automotive lighting Tool Gadget Measuring instrument Audio equipment


Where I’d start if at scratch (new version; not standard 5555). It’s a “menu-driven radio”, but that’s set & forget preferences. Run it with an RM Italy KL-203.

Or, same way, substitute radio for a PRESIDENT McKinley.

IMO, the test of a good system is Sideband QSO several states away while mobile.
Don’t settle for less.

Decent basics, both links:

(See McKinley review)
CB Radio Magazine

(And, more than you’ll need for best install)
Ham Radio Mobile Install Guide

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I ran out once, after forgetting to switch tanks in the 359.
It was definitely embarrassing to sit on the side of a 2-lane road (without a shoulder) with the hood open, but all I had to do was use the primer pump to get going again.

Would I have made it to a fuel station with the extra five gallons in a can, had the tanks been hooked together in standard configuration? Maybe. But probably not. There was more than one reason for why I separated the tanks' function with four valves.
That this setup allowed a dummy like me to run out of fuel twice as often was only a side effect.

I think you're severely overestimating today's drivers when recommending using a CB radio. They already have their hands full playing with the touch screen.
And, it’s not embarrassing to be on the side of the road with a busted 359. Hell, it’s older than about half the population. Just reply on the radio they’re asking if you’re okay with a WHOPPER of a tale.

Citizen Band
(consider that name) changes everything around it in the hands of the skilled.

You get ‘em laughing . . the service truck arrives sooner.

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I would imagine that they still went around the track. Surely not as hyper boring as an oval, but it's still going around.

There's a reason I gave up on driving road courses and went for the more three dimensional four wheeling.

IMO, being in the pit examining the tech that makes for fast cars is much more interesting than that “around & around & around” thing serving as excuse of why we’re here.

Racing improves the breed. Okay. Someone else can do the high-speed “XYZ Endurance Runs” circling the track in a pack. (Hamster wheel). See who breaks out.

The second cross-country Cannonball Baker Run in 1972 was won by some guys in a Cadillac. Man, what a dog compared to an A38-spec Dodge. Familiarity with both allows that statement. The Cad not terrible, it’d run 90+ till the sun burned out . . but it just gives up above that. (A win is going to need some higher cruise speeds some stretches).

A Tyrannosaurus Rex would be just the thing.

Car Tire Vehicle Wheel Land vehicle


That race would have been some fun (given the funds & leisure of being well-to-do). And no one said the race need be made public.

1972. The Interstates are finished and the Arab Oil Crisis still over a year away. American combat operations in Vietnam are almost over (US Army had been mutinying; fragging officers by the dozen) so things were looking good.

King of the Open Road cross-continent race limited to big-block sedans with only option-list equipment (save some police-only Goodyear Blue Streak tires; maybe electric fuel pump & additional filter) . . . facing real-life problems all along the way ought to be built-in. That’d be the right challenge.

No one-offs, no Ferraris, etc.


Okay, I’d want to blueprint every component. Just to up the chances of finishing.

— Would have had to buy fuel at least 22-24 times. Why wouldn’t reality matter? Why different than evading police?

385-series Ford and the V8-455 Buicks would have been the only other contenders. (V8-401 AMC might disagree).

Traveling the continent back then was much more of an adventure. High Octane leaded premium still available for the most part. CB barely a thing.
Photograph Wheel Light Sky Rectangle


Race over, toodle on over to the Streamline factory in the L.A. basin to pick up a 30’ Emperor before Momma and the kids fly out so’s we can see the USA, Canada & Mexico.

Sky Vehicle Wheel Motor vehicle Travel trailer

Already had all the HD/Trailer-Towing options ticked off on the Dodge as they’re the same equipment as Police Spec, in main. Change to Michelin radials, rear sway bar and add some KONI shocks.

Motor vehicle Font Automotive exterior Parallel Automotive design

Family of five and trailer-loaded for camping it’s an accurate approximate 12-13,000-lb combination.

The good old days had a great sound
(a little loud parked between walls like this).

Literally, what Grandad used (an optioned-out luxurious wolf-in-sheeps-clothing ‘67 Monaco, the last pre-emissions year).

Michigan State Police Trials in 1969 tested an A38 that with a fat boy, radios and 400-lbs gear in the trunk ran a 14.00 at just over 100-mph (record not broken for 37-years).

In the meantime of the present it’s hustling a 72’ combination cross-country at 78,000-lbs that proves a lot more interesting than round & round & round. As you gotta get up tomorrow and do it all over again you wanna eat.

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You do realize that people pay damn good money for those boards when they are weathered like that don't you?? Could've made money instead of spending it to get rid of them.
A lot of broke guys in Texas used to think that. Spent weeks in high-risk work pulling down old barns. Didn’t have customers beforehand (A rich woman decorator thing). But they got extra firewood, now.

Besides, that looks like wood fencing.
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Fifty-one percent of owners reported job openings that could not be filled, up four points from the April and March readings.

Great time to find a good job and make some money! 💲💲💲

Reality is that the wages offered haven’t also risen. (So it’s neither organic nor accidental).
 

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Telephony Office equipment Telephone Corded phone Office supplies

Fixes the problem you think you have.


Fixes the real radio problem (“the Universe is on the line, will you accept the call?”)
Gear shift Vehicle Automotive design Car Motor vehicle

Water Liquid Hood Automotive tire Vehicle


Things are getting worse. The FAA will have to start testing pilots who took The Jab for induced cardiac problems (don’t even think about our Air Force).

— Mental decline is increasing in the general population as a a result of The Vaxx with serious highway accidents reaching highs not seen in twenty years past sudden deaths at the wheel.

“Sudden Adult Death Syndrome” is the lie of how they’re trying to pass it off.


A modern AM/SSB radio system = this ain’t your fathers Oldsmobile.

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Stats are now pointing to the fact that vaccinated individuals have a higher incidence of becoming infected with COVID than non-vaccinated persons.
(not that it really matters at this point in the game) 🙁

BTW...
That fact was given to me by a friend...
who read it on the internet...
while browsing on his iPhone...
while standing in line waiting to get into a Trump rally.
So I figure it's solid data.
You can find the data if you want.
Textile Rectangle Font Wood Art


Here’s one example:
Slope Rectangle Plot Line Font


The All Death Mortality Table is the other. As rates for young, healthy adults past childhood and prior to old age Rate + Total Numbers is going off the chart.

The VAERS Table which should reflect causation of death is being (and has been) in “revision” re reporting methods. (Statistical lying).

Other countries don’t all lie about it anywhere near the extent seen in the US (as they have guns).

— The injury rate (severe) is one they assume no one will put 2+2 together. Just look for severe injury to professional athletes worldwide. (In the US the pros got saline shots as did most of Hollywood and the politicians and the rich. See the recent report of thousands of these b%^* got caught in Spain for falsified vaxx cards).

— Look for the injury & all-cause death rate in mainly Republican voting districts. Both rates are higher. (Pfizer-related).

Etc.
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2004 2500 555/5600 RWD QC/LB
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We haven't been told what the remedy is going to be. If I had to guess, I would say, no. There are many CP4 versions (experiments). We'll most likely get whatever version is in the 3rd gen EcoDiesel. The recall is the CP4.2 which is found on the 2014 - 2019 engines (29,279 Jeep Grand Cherokees with engines produced between December 2012 and October 2019 and 109,366 Rams with engines built between June 2013 and December 2019).

FCA conducted an internal investigation from February 2022 to May 2022 and found 215 customer assistance records, 1061 warranty claims and 3 field reports of failures. So, out of 138,645 vehicles, there were 1,279 reported failures or 0.92%. That's a 1% failure rate!

Like I said, maybe rubber tires will be next! We rarely hear of anyone on the forum having a CP4 pump failure.
Driving the expense of a Diesel engine higher is just as likely an explanation for both “investigation” and for the fix. Light duty diesel is just too expensive say the colluding manufacturers freed from blame at some near future date (they’re currently celebrating Pride month).
 

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2004 2500 555/5600 RWD QC/LB
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1,025 Posts
If that tow vehicle a front wheel drive only?
Then it’s only a question of setting correct weight distribution with that type of hitch.

HP, etc, isn’t the problem.
FWD isn’t any bar

WDH How To

Andrew Thomson on WDH & J2807

Hitch receiver modified to be correct. The force applied by the bars needs to have the leverage not taken up by frame shift or receiver flex


Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive tire Automotive design



Handwriting Font Line Schematic Parallel


Easier in 1966 as America hadn’t yet devolved into tattooed, drooling TV-watchers. Manufacturer-provided schematic. Unit-body makes a better tow vehicle anyway.

You see the owners of that tow rig again, maybe it’s worth the while to give them these links.

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