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I just changed my oil for the first time on my 3500. I'm a little worried because I'm missing a gallon of oil. That's right 4 quarts are just gone, I only recovered 2 gallons. I'm not sure if it was never properly filled from factory? With no MIL and no leaks whatsoever I don't know what the hell happened to 4 quarts of oil? I couldn't have possibly burned 4 quarts of oil with out a single MIL triggered. I have14k miles and I'm scratching my head wondering. The miles are all light load / no load and highway miles. Also changed the fuel filters and air filter. I was blown away with how disgusting the air filter was by the way.
 

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Hard to believe, but my guess is incorrect factory fill. From now on, check the dipstick before you do anything, so at least you know where it was and where to put it back to. 4 qyarts in 14K miles would show a trace on the floor or inside the tailpipe.

I have heard stories about how clogged the 2019 air filters are, after a few miles. I think the new air inductions system catches more debris and pushes it into the airbox a lot more that the last generation did. Those had the RAM active air that pulled air from behind the fender well area. The 19's get it from the front of the grill.

Question, how did you remove the oil filter? And did you use the mini drain tray under the filter? Also, when you opened the rear fuel filter, did more fuel drain all over the place (and you) or did the drain valve drain all?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hard to believe, but my guess is incorrect factory fill. From now on, check the dipstick before you do anything, so at least you know where it was and where to put it back to. 4 qyarts in 14K miles would show a trace on the floor or inside the tailpipe.

I have heard stories about how clogged the 2019 air filters are, after a few miles. I think the new air inductions system catches more debris and pushes it into the airbox a lot more that the last generation did. Those had the RAM active air that pulled air from behind the fender well area. The 19's get it from the front of the grill.

Question, how did you remove the oil filter? And did you use the mini drain tray under the filter? Also, when you opened the rear fuel filter, did more fuel drain all over the place (and you) or did the drain valve drain all?

I use a fluted filter socket and a ⅜ ratchet from genos garage. Once the filter is removed I use a filter cap tool from genos garage (the best invention for cummins oil changes ever). I take the cap off pre fill my new filter and clean and attach the filter cap on and fish the new prefilled filter in the the engine compartment. Once in the frame rail I remove the cap and start screwing the prefilled filter on the engine. I also installed the femco drain plugs from genos garage. We run these drains on all of our bus fleets with over 1500 buses with Cummins ISL-G motors here in Southern California and they are amazing. Also the rear fuel filter drain did pretty decent. I captured 16oz of fuel but as soon as I started turning it more fuel did come spilling out. Next time I do it I will close the drain and turn it a few rotations and reopen the drain to help eliminate the additional diesel fuel leaking everywhere.

At this point I assume it was not properly filled from the factory. Moving on I know now that no matter what the air filter has to be replaced every oil and fuel filter change. You are right about the new air dam. But due to the increase on power I think that's why they may have wanted additional air to the engine and the previous ram air didnt cut it.
 

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Hard to believe, but my guess is incorrect factory fill. From now on, check the dipstick before you do anything, so at least you know where it was and where to put it back to. 4 qyarts in 14K miles would show a trace on the floor or inside the tailpipe.



I have heard stories about how clogged the 2019 air filters are, after a few miles. I think the new air inductions system catches more debris and pushes it into the airbox a lot more that the last generation did. Those had the RAM active air that pulled air from behind the fender well area. The 19's get it from the front of the grill.



Question, how did you remove the oil filter? And did you use the mini drain tray under the filter? Also, when you opened the rear fuel filter, did more fuel drain all over the place (and you) or did the drain valve drain all?


The ram active air pulled air from the front grill, unless active air was active, then pulling from the fender well area as well.


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I have to ask: Was it low on the dipstick 14,000 miles ago, did it happen gradually, or did the oil disappear right before the oil change?

Also, was the oil drained hot or cold?
 

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I just changed my oil for the first time on my 3500. I'm a little worried because I'm missing a gallon of oil. That's right 4 quarts are just gone, I only recovered 2 gallons. I'm not sure if it was never properly filled from factory? With no MIL and no leaks whatsoever I don't know what the hell happened to 4 quarts of oil? I couldn't have possibly burned 4 quarts of oil with out a single MIL triggered. I have14k miles and I'm scratching my head wondering. The miles are all light load / no load and highway miles. Also changed the fuel filters and air filter. I was blown away with how disgusting the air filter was by the way.
You drove it 14,000 miles and never checked the oil, not even once?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This was the first time I changed the oil on this truck. The oil was drained cold and was full about a month or so ago just as it was full this afternoon after it was changed it. The truck has been in the shop several times too. I would have expected it to be checked then possibly too, the tech did sign legal documents stating to have completed a multipoint inspection which include enging oil check. I just can't believe I could possibly be missing 4qts and not have a single leak or check engine light. I'm still baffled.
 

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If you drained it cold, that explains part of it. At least if you didn't let it drain for a really long time.
Also, did you count what was in the filter?

Not that I'd expect an entire gallon to go missing that way, but a couple of quarts would be feasible, I think.
 

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FWIW, I've checked the oil on my 3500 and learned the first week of ownership that if the truck is on a very very slight incline, the dipstick will report 1 1/2 - 2 quarts low. Our driveway has a slight decline from the street but the slope decreases and is very slight at the garage. When I checked it, the front of the truck was pointed toward the street. Again the incline where I checked it is very very slight. I thought it was odd that it was low, so I checked it at a gas station and was normal.

My Ford isn't as sensitive.

So, it might report the opposite if it's on an decline. If the oil was added and then checked on an decline (rear higher), it could report full, even though it's slightly low.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I do check my oil on a slight decline so it is possible to be slightly off. But I couldn't imagine by that much. The oil filter did drain for about 20 or 30 minutes though. I only let the oil drain for 10 mins or so. After I filled the engine with oil it only showed full and not above the full line on flat surface. I was worried I over filled it after I poured the old oil into the new empty containers. I'll be paying a lot more attention to my oil level moving forward though. Especially next oil change too.
 

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Far more likely you got an oil burner on your hands. Rings never seated in. Boy toyed Cummins used for commute rigs run that risk. No broken in correctly.
May still have a chance, hook onto something high wide and heavy, 5er is the best. Head to the hills and try to pull its guts out every weekend 500 miles for a month.
Or there is a problem with the crankcase vapors emissions system.

These are machined filled and machine level checked at the Mexican factory. Checked again by human at the selling dealer before sold.

Put a piece of aluminum window screening across the front of the air intake
Check it and the dipstick often, especially spring and fall bug hatches

There is always about 1/8>1/4 inch of oil left in bottom of Cummins oil pan, way they're made and positioning of drain bunge. Oil filter on these will soak up a qt+- a tad.

Send in an oil sample to an oil analysis lab from this change and each change with the heavy pull breakin. See what wear metals the motor has.

Dip stick levels on these can vary a couple inches or more, depending on parking level, oil temperature, oil pushed up or pulled down in tube by crankcase pressure, viscosity drain back.
 

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The oil filter did drain for about 20 or 30 minutes though.
Not sure how draining the oil filter is relevant to your concern. Besides, draining an oil filter can days upon days.

I only let the oil drain for 10 mins or so.
Not nearly long enough, especially if the oil is cold. I learned the following the hard way: The oil filter holds a quart. The top end of these engines will retain at least a quart when the engine is hot. That's why FCA (Cummins) recommends checking the oil level at least 30 min after shutdown. There is also a not insignificant amount of oil left in the bottom of the oil pan due to its design (the way it's stamped). Suffice to say, check the oil on a level surface and know where it's at before the change. If you check the oil right after shut down and it's half way up the safe zone on the dipstick, expect that mark to rise to full after 30 or more minutes. Drain the oil when it's hot and let it drain for at least 20 to 30 min! I don't think you lost a gal of oil. It was there all along.
 

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Pray tell, what is the "correct" break in procedure on a 2019?
Well... let's consult the Owner's Manual:

"The Cummins turbocharged diesel engine does not require
a break-in period due to its construction. Normal operation
is allowed, providing the following recommendations are
followed:
• Warm up the engine before placing it under load.
• Do not operate the engine at idle for prolonged periods.
• Use the appropriate transmission gear to prevent engine
lugging.
• Observe vehicle oil pressure and temperature indicators.
• Check the coolant and oil levels frequently.
• Vary throttle position at highway speeds when carrying
or towing significant weight."
 

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Far more likely you got an oil burner on your hands. Rings never seated in. Boy toyed Cummins used for commute rigs run that risk. No broken in correctly.
May still have a chance, hook onto something high wide and heavy, 5er is the best. Head to the hills and try to pull its guts out every weekend 500 miles for a month.
Or there is a problem with the crankcase vapors emissions system.

These are machined filled and machine level checked at the Mexican factory. Checked again by human at the selling dealer before sold.

Put a piece of aluminum window screening across the front of the air intake
Check it and the dipstick often, especially spring and fall bug hatches

There is always about 1/8>1/4 inch of oil left in bottom of Cummins oil pan, way they're made and positioning of drain bunge. Oil filter on these will soak up a qt+- a tad.

Send in an oil sample to an oil analysis lab from this change and each change with the heavy pull breakin. See what wear metals the motor has.

Dip stick levels on these can vary a couple inches or more, depending on parking level, oil temperature, oil pushed up or pulled down in tube by crankcase pressure, viscosity drain back.
Wow this is the first post I have read that you didn't blame Trump.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The oil filter did drain for about 20 or 30 minutes though.
Not sure how draining the oil filter is relevant to your concern. Besides, draining an oil filter can days upon days.

I only let the oil drain for 10 mins or so.
Not nearly long enough, especially if the oil is cold. I learned the following the hard way: The oil filter holds a quart. The top end of these engines will retain at least a quart when the engine is hot. That's why FCA (Cummins) recommends checking the oil level at least 30 min after shutdown. There is also a not insignificant amount of oil left in the bottom of the oil pan due to its design (the way it's stamped). Suffice to say, check the oil on a level surface and know where it's at before the change. If you check the oil right after shut down and it's half way up the safe zone on the dipstick, expect that mark to rise to full after 30 or more minutes. Drain the oil when it's hot and let it drain for at least 20 to 30 min! I don't think you lost a gal of oil. It was there all along.

These trucks take 2 different oils either 10W-30 or 5W-40 depending on climate. I'm in southern California so I used 10W-30. When an engine is cool the oil reflects it's cold viscosity which is SAE 10. The W in 10W-30 stands for winter not weight. Thus meaning when it is cold the polymers are closer together and make it less viscous than when it is hot and the polymers stretch out making it more viscous so it technically drains easier then when it is cool. Mind you I live in a warm climate and it was 80°F when i changed my oil yesterday. I have changed oil the same way my whole life and have yet to have an issue changing oil on cool engines. My 16 2500 never had a problem with it. Nor did any of the buses in our fleet of over 1500 with cummins ISL-G motors have a problem either. Oil can be changed warm but like you mentioned you should wait a minimum of 30 minutes to let the oil settle.
 
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