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Well, not a good start to a 2600 mile cross country move of all our household goods. Currently 175 miles from our departure point. We just made a 15 min rest stop and maybe 4 miles after, up a good grade, passenger side rear tire took a vacation and plopped the caliper and rotor for a spark show grinding to a halt.

2014 2500. Stock Wheels, stock lugs, torqued to 135. Tires are Toyo RT 285/75R18 at 80psi. Trailer is 15k and tires are G rated 14 ply. All tire on truck and trailer were replaced a few months ago. Airbags and Hellwig sway bar with deeper trans and diff cover. I will say we did not check lug torque At the rest stop 10 min prior and attribute that to part of the possible failure.

Could have been a LOT worse. No body damage, no damage to rear trailer or to anybody else following behind. Wheel sheared and rolled off.

My point for this post is looking for any input on why this catastrophic failure occurred. Or where I failed and can do better. Additionally, what other things should the mechanic address while we are at it?
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My guess is wheel came loose no way can sheer from weight for rim rest on hub if rim was stock.

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So where are the lugs and studs. Are the base of the studs in the hub. You're lifted how much. How were the other lugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So where are the lugs and studs. Are the base of the studs in the hub. You're lifted how much. How were the other lugs.
I can visibly see 2 studs sheared at the hub still in the hub. The remainder of lugs and studs are scattered on eastbound I-40 17 miles west of Needles, CA.

Lift is a Thuren 2” level, stock rear springs with 2.5 Kings all the way around and Thuren F/R track bars.

Some lugs on the trailer were a 1/16 turn loose. The remainder of the truck lugs were at or near 135.

Without me checking while the truck was idle for 15 min, I guess I just need to check early and often. Hoping I won’t be stranded in Needles very long. 😳
 

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Can't say what happened with any certainty. I can say that the oem lug nuts are junk, very soft and easy to cross thread, I replaced mine long ago.

Does not make sense that all, or enough lugs were loose to cause them all to shear off, unless they weren't torqued properly last time that wheel was off.
 

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Did you torque them down or did a tire shop? Always retorque after 100 miles of initial tightening. All shops that I am aware of do this for free after they have worked on your vehicle.
 
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Looks like cheap aftermarket rims.
 
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Wow, sorry to hear of this happening. Even worse when moving x country. Not fun.
Definitely not a common occurrence. And I've only had one vehicle shear lugs in the past and it was a questionable setup to begin with.
Looks like you have bags added to bags. What was your pin weight? And what pressure in the aftermarket bags needed to keep the OE air springs working? "Moving" trailers can get real heavy and I've loaded the front of a trailer way too much in the past trying to make everything "fit."
Do you know if the rim broke first or the lugs?
Not throwing stones here about the load you were carrying, as there will be folks that will likely do that.
 

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Well, something caused this to happen. It's not common. I doubt it's a factory defect. Any guess as to the possible causes?
 

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Was there any warning signs that you missed in hind sight? Wobble, vibration, grinding sounds.
My buddy has a 15 2500, and his wheel studs started breaking at 90k. He had his tires rotated, and the company came out and said 1 or 2 broke when rotating the tires. Then he went back 5k miles later another 1 or 2 broke. Once again 5k later same issue. He opted to have all of them replaced for peace of mind. No issues after replacement.
 

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My point for this post is looking for any input on why this catastrophic failure occurred. Or where I failed and can do better. Additionally, what other things should the mechanic address while we are at it?
As to what the mechanic should look at, since everybody seemed to forget about that little question.....

Replace - Rotor, and brake pads, and new studs would be a good idea
Inspect axle, suspension, hub for damage. Possibly consider replacing the outer bearings on your axle, they probably got a shock but are more then likely OK.

In the future, try to pay closer to attention to the feel of the truck. Doing a visual inspection and touching the lugs without a wrench will generally tell you if something is loose or needs attention. Every time i stop i walk around my truck when traveling, inspecting the truck and trailer for defects and or signs of issues. It only takes a minute, and gives you an excuse to stretch and walk around a bit. Generally something like this you will feel in the truck prior to failure. But even once you feel it, your studs are already shot. But the best thing you can do is to inspect everything right after you stop, and right before you leave. At rest steps i will walk around the truck and trailer when i stop, and again when i'm ready to leave. Sometimes you might not catch something the first time, you don't need to go out and spend a 30 minute inspection every time, just a quick walk around, kick the tires and take a close look at the lug nuts and feel for excessive heat on wheel bearings, only takes a minute,a minute, and can save you a lot of hassle, even if 99% of the time there is nothing wrong. You'll also gain an eye for when something doesn't look right.

My suspicion for the culprit, like stated, over or under torqued nuts.
 

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Can't say what happened with any certainty. I can say that the oem lug nuts are junk, very soft and easy to cross thread, I replaced mine long ago.

Does not make sense that all, or enough lugs were loose to cause them all to shear off, unless they weren't torqued properly last time that wheel was off.
Were the wheels ever rechecked after the new tires were installed ? Where I get my tires, I sign the invoice making it my responsibility to recheck the torque shortly after install.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Looks like you have bags added to bags. What was your pin weight? And what pressure in the aftermarket bags needed to keep the OE air springs working?
Do you know if the rim broke first or the lugs?
I’m not sure if chicken or the egg came first. The bags are Firestone and inflated to around ~70psi. No double bag like Kelderman though. Not sure what pin weight is as we didn’t make it to our first fill up at around Kingman, AZ for a weigh in.

Generally something like this you will feel in the truck prior to failure. But even once you feel it, your studs are already shot. But the best thing you can do is to inspect everything right after you stop, and right before you leave. At rest steps i will walk around the truck and trailer when i stop, and again when i'm ready to leave. Sometimes you might not catch something the first time, you don't need to go out and spend a 30 minute inspection every time, just a quick walk around, kick the tires and take a close look at the lug nuts and feel for excessive heat on wheel bearings, only takes a minute,a minute, and can save you a lot of hassle, even if 99% of the time there is nothing wrong. You'll also gain an eye for when something doesn't look right.

My suspicion for the culprit, like stated, over or under torqued nuts.
I believe it may be over torqued nuts. At my own fault believing so as well. Antisieze was applied in a small amount when I last put on the wheels/tires. I torqued myself in a progressional upping of torque starting at 100 and on up to 135. Will be checking at every availability now on.

I felt an ever so small shimmy in the wheel for about 2 miles prior to catastrophe. It did not feel like a water bed feeling that you sometimes get with super loose lugs though.

Looks like cheap aftermarket rims.
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When I Purchased my New set of tires the Shop Guy used an Impact on all of the Lugs. They also used Anti Seize on the Threads on the Front Studs. The Factory Spec is 140 on the Lug Nuts. I started to Torque the Fronts and Snapped off the Studs that the Lubricant was used, I have never snapped off the studs on either of My trucks. Had two studs replaced at the shop that did the work and then proceeded to remove and clean off all the Lubricated ones and replaced the Nuts. No issues after that with re torque when rotations are done. Anti Seize will give you a false reading for tightness when torqing
 

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Rear Admiral Rickard Onmi
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Anti sieze should not be used on lug nuts. Adding friction modifiers to torqued fasteners actually increases the applied torque to the stud, stretching it more and creating an overtorqued situation. Torque on a nut is technically measuring the friction, by reducing the friction you decrease the required torque to apply the correct amount of tension the stud is designed for. So when you go to the standard torque setting, your are actually over torquing the stud, and stretching it which will result in failure. Applying the anti seize to your studs is most likely the culprit of your issues.
 

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Anti sieze should not be used on lug nuts. Adding friction modifiers to torqued fasteners actually increases the applied torque to the stud, stretching it more and creating an overtorqued situation. Torque on a nut is technically measuring the friction, by reducing the friction you decrease the required torque to apply the correct amount of tension the stud is designed for. So when you go to the standard torque setting, your are actually over torquing the stud, and stretching it which will result in failure. Applying the anti seize to your studs is most likely the culprit of your issues.
Funny thing though, If I install wheels on any Caterpillar machine, they call for antiseeze, or some sort of special lube. And of course there is a torque spec, or many have a torque, turn spec.
 
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