Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there a tool that will allow the injector to be left in place while changing valve springs? I would like to leave the injectors in for now. If it can’t be done I’ll just wait to do the springs when doing injectors.
 
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
Not that I know of.
I have done numerous common rail springs, injectors and head studs (including mine) and the injectors are always removed to install the valve compressor and then swap springs.

I also recommend to install head studs at the same time as valve springs and injectors.
Having the injectors out of the way for head stud installation makes it so much easier, plus no chance of damaging an injectors with the breaker bar or torque wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Not that I know of.
I have done numerous common rail springs, injectors and head studs (including mine) and the injectors are always removed to install the valve compressor and then swap springs.

I also recommend to install head studs at the same time as valve springs and injectors.
Having the injectors out of the way for head stud installation makes it so much easier, plus no chance of damaging an injectors with the breaker bar or torque wrench.
Ok, that’s good to know. If not replacing injectors can the copper washer be reused?
 
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
If not replacing injectors can the copper washer be reused?
You are not supposed to re-use any copper washer in any application.
The copper washers are cheap, just pick up 6 at a Cummins shop and call it good....

However, I have reused the copper washers before with no issues. Clean them and closely inspect them.
Good quality torque wrench when re-installing the injectors.

For the injector lines and fittings, use a gentle hand with a small combination wrench.
There are torque settings for every fitting but there is no way to get a torque wrench on every fitting, plus the crowsfoot socket is clumsy and inaccurate at best.

Take your time. Cleanliness is critical. Remove the hood for lots of room and light.
I am super slow with all my upgrades. It's embarrassing how long it takes me to do headstuds but no issues on my truck (or any other truck). I did the headstuds in my truck 15 or more years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You are not supposed to re-use any copper washer in any application.
The copper washers are cheap, just pick up 6 at a Cummins shop and call it good....

However, I have reused the copper washers before with no issues. Clean them and closely inspect them.
Good quality torque wrench when re-installing the injectors.

For the injector lines and fittings, use a gentle hand with a small combination wrench.
There are torque settings for every fitting but there is no way to get a torque wrench on every fitting, plus the crowsfoot socket is clumsy and inaccurate at best.

Take your time. Cleanliness is critical. Remove the hood for lots of room and light.
I am super slow with all my upgrades. It's embarrassing how long it takes me to do headstuds but no issues on my truck (or any other truck). I did the headstuds in my truck 15 or more years ago.
Ok, that all sounds good. I plan to take it slow as well.
Will the humidity in the air hurt anything while I have the valve cover pulled off for the springs and head studs? I want to get the rocker box spacer powder coated so it may be a few days before I get things put back together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
It shouldn’t being its all oil soaked. If you’re real worried a light mist of WD40 and a plastic bag would help id think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Who uses ARP lube on the block side of the stud as well as the top side? Their instructions and the glacier diesel instructions do not mention using it on the bock side threads, however, the ARP FAQ page says it should be used on both sides.
 
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
IMO, there is no need to add ARP lube on the block side of the stud threads. I never have.
I put a thin coating on top threads, both sides of the washer and bottom side of the nut.
Loosely screw in the stud to the bottom of the hole and then back off a 1/4 turn or so.

However, I use a bottom tap and a shop vac with each of stud holes in the block.
Tape on a thin tube to the shop vac to get right to the bottom of the stud hole.

But... most guys don't tap and clean each stud hole in the block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
IMO, there is no need to add ARP lube on the block side of the stud threads. I never have.
I put a thin coating on top threads, both sides of the washer and bottom side of the nut.
Loosely screw in the stud to the bottom of the hole and then back off a 1/4 turn or so.

However, I use a bottom tap and a shop vac with each of stud holes in the block.
Tape on a thin tube to the shop vac to get right to the bottom of the stud hole.

But... most guys don't tap and clean each stud hole in the block.
Ok, I installed them yesterday and did use a shop vac with a small tube to clean out each bolt hole before I installed the stud. I didn’t use ARP lube on the block threads but read last night on the ARP website about using it on both sides. Just wanted to make sure I didn’t need to pull them and add lube to both sides.

When doing the pre stretch that is in the GDP instructions should I take the nut off and relube it each time?

Also, after I got all studs done at 100 ft/lbs I increased to 115 then accidentally 135 in an attempt to do 15ft/lbs increments (it’s was very hot so I’m blaming my terrible mental math on heat exhaustion). Was that 20 ft/lb increase too much for the head gasket?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top