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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I may be beating a dead horse here, I admit I dont read the forum except when I have a problem and I apologize for that, but I work out of town most of the time and when I'm home I like to spend time with the better half and the little one as much as I can, besides there isnt much I can attribute to this as you guys have it covered.
My 06 1 ton has had injector problems twice in its 93000 mile life.
I guess it may be attributed to the low sulphur fuel, but ??
The dealer said it could be caused by excessive idiling, but after the first round of injectors I have been watching that and dont think its the cause.
My 95 1 ton never did have an injector problem, and I'm getting fuel from the same places. Sure glad I still have it as a backup. It's just a pain swapping everything over from one truck to the other & back again. I read that alot of you guys are using 2 stroke oil for an additive, I have used some power services and admit I haven't done it every tankful as I cant always find it.
Now for my dummie questions--
Should I get a different filter setup? What should I use as an additive?
Should I get aftermarket injectors?


Thanks Dennis

06 1 ton dually welding truck
 

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WATER and MEADIA kills injectors......... snake oil wont help...... I suggest go to
wwwfiltakleen.com and get educated
 

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I may be beating a dead horse here, I admit I dont read the forum except when I have a problem and I apologize for that, but I work out of town most of the time and when I'm home I like to spend time with the better half and the little one as much as I can, besides there isnt much I can attribute to this as you guys have it covered.
My 06 1 ton has had injector problems twice in its 93000 mile life.
I guess it may be attributed to the low sulphur fuel, but ??
The dealer said it could be caused by excessive idiling, but after the first round of injectors I have been watching that and dont think its the cause.
My 95 1 ton never did have an injector problem, and I'm getting fuel from the same places. Sure glad I still have it as a backup. It's just a pain swapping everything over from one truck to the other & back again. I read that alot of you guys are using 2 stroke oil for an additive, I have used some power services and admit I haven't done it every tankful as I cant always find it.
Now for my dummie questions--
Should I get a different filter setup? What should I use as an additive?
Should I get aftermarket injectors?


Thanks Dennis

06 1 ton dually welding truck

How often do you check you fuel filter/ water seperator?

When you do ckeck it do you get water from it?

With ULSD Power Service wont help with lubey.

Only 2 cycle oil will do that real good, but you have to use 1oz per gal of fuel.

Also idleing the truck does not cause injector problems. :thumbsup
 

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Here we go again...... I down loaded this off filtakleens web site . You can all so call industrail injection, or any reputable injector and or pump rebuilder and ask them WHAT causes this failure ......You will get the same anser.

Solving Fuel Water Problems...

Water is always present, to some degree, in your fuel system or bulk storage tanks. This water may be a result of condensation when temperatures rise and fall by more than 7 degrees, or by leaky storage tanks or by other means. Water can cause stalling, diesel gelling, fuel line freezing, corrosion in the fuel tank and lines, and injector and engine damage.

The natural properties of diesel fuel make moisture related problems more critical in diesel equipment. Diesel fuel is heavier than gasoline, therefore the volatility (ability to vaporize) of diesel fuel is much lower than gasoline. This lower volatility allows air and moisture to infiltrate the diesel fuel in both vehicle and bulk storage tanks much faster than gasoline. Water condensation in diesel fuel storage tanks is a routine problem that must be solved by all users of diesel fuels. The longer the fuel is stored the larger the problems become.

Being less refined than gasoline, diesel fuel will hold a much larger amount of water in suspension. This suspended water can cause severe problems with everyday water separators installed on the vehicle as well causing the fuel injector tips to explode resulting in extensive repair costs.

A type of algae grows at the fuel-water interface if there is any water in the storage tank. It doesn't take much water. The algae clogs filters and has a high sulfur content and causes sulfur corrosion in the fuel pumps and injector nozzles.

Many diesel equipped vehicles and off road equipment usually have a factory installed fuel/water separator. A primary filter should have a see-through bowl with a drain so that WATER can be rapidly detected and removed. A sample should be taken from the filter at regular intervals. A visual inspection with a flashlight may show the water in the bottom of the bowl. Water will be clear and the fuel will have a color. Drain if necessary. Usually this can be done with the engine running to allow any air bubbles to work through the engine without stalling.

A gasoline engine can pass a small amount of water and just run poorly while it's doing it. A bottle of "Heet" and a new fuel filter takes care of things. However, a diesel engine has high pressure, very close tolerance, fuel injection pumps. Water in the fuel causes damage due to lack of lubricity and cavitation damage. New injection pumps can be an expensive proposition.

While many fuel/water separators do an adequate job of water removal, not all are created equal. Increased efficiencies of water & impurities removal are realized by using 'centrifugal' type separators.

In a centrifuge designed filter separator, fuel enters the centrifuge, separating larger particles of dirt and droplets of water down to 30 microns. The centrifuge does not spin. The filter spins the fuel in a circular motion as it passes through the channels of the centrifuge. Elements are generally available in 2, 10 or 30 micron rating.

Next, as the fuel comes out of the centrifuge it will then hit the side of the bowl allowing the dirt and water to settle to the bottom of the bowl. In advanced designs, the fuel flows through a second centrifuge stage and passes on the outside of the centrifuge. At this point the small droplets of water and dirt particles are thrown to the center of the bowl, moving around and forming larger droplets of water. There, the larger vane will catch the particles and bring them down through the vane. This is produced by the vacuum on the lowest part of the second vane.

What happens next is almost blissful, as the continuous circular motion of the fuel, the dirt, and water droplets, continue to grow together, they become heavier and fall back into the bowl again, thereby removing harmful particulates and water in a way that blows away conventional debris/water removal. Once again, in advanced designed units, specially treated water resistant paper will filter out all remaining dirt and water.

Installation of these units can usually be done in a couple of hours or less, and save many man hours, as well as other valuable resources spent trying to revive down-timed equipment. For additional information about fuel/water separators, visit our website @ Filtakleen USA-- Pro active Maintenance Solutions.


Curt Ence
[email protected]
 

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The 06 runs in the thousands of psi, up to 23K stock I think... and the 95 doesn't.... so with that alone the 06 is more sensitive to fuel.

I would recommend running the Baldwin PF7977 fuel filter, it exceeds the OEM specs which will help injector life. The only fuel filters I know of that meet the OEM specs are the baldwin and OEM, none of the other do. I would also change it every 10K.

I also would run an additive that adds lubricity, or run B5. I use Amsoil Diesel Concentrate, it adds lubricity and helps keep the fuel system clean.
 

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Also idleing the truck does not cause injector problems. :thumbsup
In cold weather, long periods of idling can be very harmful to your CTD. Combustion chamber temperatures can drop so low that the fuel will not burn completely allowing carbon and varnish to form on piston rings and injector nozzles. Also unburned fuel can enter the crankcase, diluting the oil and causing rapid wear to the engine. Read page 254 of manual.
This is easy to verify, just watch your coolant temp drop by the minute as you idle in the winter. The high speed idle is one way to help avoid this if you must idle. An exhaust brake is the ultimate option for getting and keeping engine up to operating temps.
Nearly all of the injector failures happen around here in the winter time ... and mainly caused by water contamination. Many people NEVER drain the water from the filter bowl ... especially in winter when condensation forms more quickly and abundantly due to constant freeze/thaw cycles. Anti-gel is also highly recommended in cold climates.

What time of year are you having your injector problems btw?
 

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I just read a thred in TRD by steved ( titled..i need injecrors,like soon friday)
i would recamend raeding it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input guys!

I'm pretty good about servicing, this includes changing and draining the fuel filter.
Guess I'll give the 2 stroke oil a try as where I'm at, it's kinda hard to find different fuel additives, Power services is around most of the time, but others I've heard about such as Stanadyne and Ams but havent seen any.

Thanks for the help
 

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What else can i say..... dumbfounded,stuned,in disbeleafe,shocked,clearly a wast of my time. You can lead a cumins owner to knowledge, but you cant make them learn.
 

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why cant you run the water/fuel separator drainage open all the time?
 

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My injectors were acting up bad until I started running Stanadyne Performace Formula. It cleans and lubricates. They also make Winter Blend and Lubricity Blend. These folks (Stanadyne) make fuel injection systems so I figured they know how to lubricate and run them.
 

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That little write up said that you should drain the water with the engine running.... BIG no no. I found that out the hard way and stalled my engine. They won't run on air believe it or not.... Gettin em restarted once you've introduced air to the system is a big pain in the too.
 

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That little write up said that you should drain the water with the engine running.... BIG no no. I found that out the hard way and stalled my engine. They won't run on air believe it or not.... Gettin em restarted once you've introduced air to the system is a big pain in the too.
VERY VERY TRUE
 

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That little write up said that you should drain the water with the engine running.... BIG no no. I found that out the hard way and stalled my engine. They won't run on air believe it or not.... Gettin em restarted once you've introduced air to the system is a big pain in the too.
How much were you draining? I have never even had the motor cough... Just open it a little for a second or so... it doesn't take much.
 

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How much were you draining? I have never even had the motor cough... Just open it a little for a second or so... it doesn't take much.
Apparently enough to make it die...
 

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The fuel comes in and out at the top of the seperator unit. THe water and petcock are at the bottom of the unit. The system is sealed (like bleeding brakes) if you open the bleed in your brake system, you let more air in ...than you let fluid out. Your seperator work the same way. The fuel pump must be running to bleed your seperator correctly. since the pump only runs continuasly win the motor is running. You need to bleed the seperator with the motor running. There is a trick..... only crack bleed breefly, then wait several seconds and then repeat. keep in mind...this is a comin rail post
 

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The fuel comes in and out at the top of the seperator unit. THe water and petcock are at the bottom of the unit. The system is sealed (like bleeding brakes) if you open the bleed in your brake system, you let more air in ...than you let fluid out. Your seperator work the same way. The fuel pump must be running to bleed your seperator correctly. since the pump only runs continuasly win the motor is running. You need to bleed the seperator with the motor running. There is a trick..... only crack bleed breefly, then wait several seconds and then repeat. keep in mind...this is a comin rail post
I always drain mine with the truck not running Open the top of the canister pull the filter drain completely, replace the filter, and then turn the key on to refill the canister. I don't see how that would not "correctly" bleed my separator
 

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Your talking about a filter change, we're talking about the draining of water your "supposed" to do at every fill up. (Which makes me want to put a longer hose on so it doesn't dump right onto the front diff.
 
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