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I get that lots of folks on here are trying to save money where they can, and there are parts that I think are just fine to go with the "much cheaper, but almost as good" version of things. There are certain parts that I think can really come back to bite you if you cheap out on, like the air filter.

I too am trying to save money, but after reading up 40 or 50 different discussions about after market air filters and BHAF's for the last 24 hours now, my brain has started to ooze out of my ears and I am no closer to figuring out what to do, so I thought I would take a different approach here and ask:

If money were no object, given all of the different air filter options that are out there... Which one do you think is best? I've seen BHAF's for $35 + a Prefilter for another $20 and everything all the way up to the $410 AFE here; https://puredieselpower.com/dodge-products/cummins-5.9l-afe-51-72001-e-diesel-elite-momentum-hd-intake.html

I feel like dry is 100% the way to go, over the "oiled" versions i've seen based on the commentaries, but there is just no real consensus out there (at least not in the threads ive read) about what filter system is the best.

Any comments/advise/personal experience is much appreciated!

Cheers,

Josh
 

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Having the air filter all enclosed and protected unlike the BHAF was the selling point for me. I use oiled filter, with a prefilter around it. I have one of these: https://puredieselpower.com/dodge-products/1994-2002-dodge-5.9l-cummins-afe-stage-2-pro-guard-7-air-intake.html

The sound difference from the passenger side of the engine bay while driving is way different between the metal enclosure and a plastic enclosure. Much more deep tones while coasting and decelerating, in my opinion the metal box is the way to go.
 

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Guess I could have provided a bit more info on my truck... Motor was just rebuilt, bored out twenty thousandths, pretty much new everything, studded, tst power plate, timing turned up just a touch.
 

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The stock filter is plenty for a untuned truck. Unless your going for sound.
Agree 100%. Unless you outflow the cfm of the stock filter, there is no reason to change. Roadkill just did a test doing this with a Duramax using the edge blade one that cost 300 bucks. Only got them 6 degree cooler AIT...i.e. no power gain. There isn't a chance the engineers at s&b, edge, or any other flavor figured some sort of better technique - but they'll market that they have.
 

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Yes, stock air filter will flow enough for a stock engine. But the factory plastic filter box is too close to the heat of the turbo and notorious for cracking and not sealing correctly, which both lead to dust/debris making its way into the turbo/engine. Replacing the factory airbox with an aftermarket air filter system that still draws cold air from the fender is not a bad investment, even if you're not seeking more power.
 

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The bigger the filter, the longer service life before cleaning or replacement. I've got the afe cai on one truck and an amsoil (open like a bhaf) on the other. Both do well with the dust check on the tube between the filter and turbo. I know that's not very good test, but it's something.
 

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I’ve got over 400k miles logged with oiled filters with zero I’ll effects. That being said if I was in your shoes I’d put the dry BHAF on and call it a day. Like DAP said, unless your chasing big power those things flow plenty and filter out almost everything.
 

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Easiest way to clean the oil type is to soak the whole think in warm water with liquid dish soap over night and air dry it in the sun. Light on the oil. I was thinking of going back to the dry type. I want to design a ram air type. Don't know what kind of filter yet. Might increase mileage on the freeway.
 

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Years ago my factory airbox was showing signs of beginning to leak slightly, so it was time for me to upgrade. Tried the BHAF idea, but ended up not liking it hanging out there with no protection around it, filters are too easy to damage without even noticing until it is too late, plus water can get up there rather easily. Ended up getting a S&B setup with a dry filter. Did not do this for performance gains, and no increase in performance was noticed after installing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Easiest way to clean the oil type is to soak the whole think in warm water with liquid dish soap over night and air dry it in the sun. Light on the oil. I was thinking of going back to the dry type. I want to design a ram air type. Don't know what kind of filter yet. Might increase mileage on the freeway.
This is an interesting comment, to me and here's why... I used to race cars, and invariably the filter was not in an ideal place to put a hood scoop for ram air... Our's is situated in a perfect spot to do so... Has anyone seen a ram air set up for our trucks? I'm genuinely curious.

Coming from a racing background, I know that i'm not putting out the kind of horsies to justify something like this, however, an argument can always be made for ANY turbo vehicle that bringing in ambient outside air to the filter will always be better than pre-heated air from the engine bay.
 

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I'm ambivalent about fresh/cold air unless it's at WOT.

At idle/putting around, the engine's just not making enough horse torques to benefit from colder air, and the warmer under hood air does seem to help with fuel atomization in winter.
 

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This is an interesting comment, to me and here's why... I used to race cars, and invariably the filter was not in an ideal place to put a hood scoop for ram air... Our's is situated in a perfect spot to do so... Has anyone seen a ram air set up for our trucks? I'm genuinely curious.

Coming from a racing background, I know that i'm not putting out the kind of horsies to justify something like this, however, an argument can always be made for ANY turbo vehicle that bringing in ambient outside air to the filter will always be better than pre-heated air from the engine bay.
There is no advantage for a "ram air" scoop. Generally all those do is allow direct pathway for dirt, water, and debris. But people think they're great because they remember the old carbureted engine days where shoving air into the plenum was good.

These trucks have a cold(er) air source from the inner fender. And it works too. The only question I ever had was doesnt the dust from the front tire get sucked up right there? :confused013: Apparently the engineers did a decent job otherwise it would be a problem.

And for those members who keep reiterating that there is NO direct power gain to be had from changing the air filter system. They are absolutely correct because thats not how diesels work... The gain is maintaining cooler intake air to allow for more fueling. Fueling is power but power is heat. Lower the intake charge of more fueling and you help offset the overall EGT's.

That said, back in the early 2000's there was someone who designed and manufactured an enclosed air filter setup which tied into the HVAC cowl air via a 4" hole you had to drill through the firewall. It was called the "Scotty Air System". Did it work?...yes, yes it did as people noted around a 150* reduction in EGT's. The source of air was the best because the cowl is a cool, low pressure, and clean air pocket. The problem is that the turbo noise in the cab became unbearable for most people due to the direct sound pathway of intake noise to HVAC system vents.

So...a BHAF works but need protection from filter damage and also the heat of the neighboring turbo. Yes they will ingest hot engine bay air but its not terrible. Thus a heat shield is very beneficial. I installed a turbo blanket a couple years ago and it was a HUGE improvement in towing EGT's. :thumbup:
 

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And this is why I have a total of 4 heat blankets on my rig, along with the summer setup being - a longer intake tube + partially shielded air filter to draw fresh air from the fender well & front grill opening + a bit more fuel + a bit more advance ;-)
 

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I've been wanting to get a manifold blanket as well but...its just not high on my stuff to spend money on list. Especially since I think I have my current setup dialed in just fine for everything I ask of my truck.
 

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I just try to keep as much heat inside the manifold/turbine housings as I can, to the point where a bit more will over whelm that poor 30 year old frame & braking system, well maintained though they are.

Heavy stainless diesel exhaust manifold + Levi's manifold wrap on mine.

No performance increase with the SD manifold, but it does radiate less heat than the stocker/cast iron units.
 

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I believe forcing air into the turbo will see gains in the form of volumetric efficiency. The engine will not have to work as hard to breathe. The cold air nature of a ram system might benefit my p24v more than a vp truck as cold iat has an injection timing effect. I don't understand everything (much at all) that goes on in the computer control of a vp44 motor. That's why I ppump my trucks for simplicity. A tractor motor (p24v) will benefit from cold air. Katoom is right that debris has to be managed with the filter. I think a ram might help efficiency. I plan to experiment.
 

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You cant "ram" the air into a turbo. The volume of air ingested at any given time at the turbo inlet is far beyond any pressures you could create with an air scoop. You'd have to be driving at speeds well above 150 mph to affect anything...and at that it would be negligible. Turbos only pull in the amount of air in relation to the volumetric pressures of hot air exiting the exhaust based on load. At no time is the engine working to breath otherwise there would be no boost. Boost is simply the amount of pressure always sitting in the intake system waiting to be ingested by the cylinders. A naturally aspirated engine in turn requires ambient pressures, velocity, and scavenging in order to work efficiently and can more easily benefit from a ram air affect.
 

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A compound turbo is a ram air for a turbo. I'm suggesting that the increase in pressure on one side of the compressor has an effect on the other side.
 
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