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Discussion Starter #21
Baja, you might get even less noise if you used a slit in some foam under the plywood. A slit is just a cut in the material. The transfer case shifter will move though that slit. The slit will close up as the shifter goes through. A slot is a continuous small hole for the shifter lever. Some noise will always get through a slot.

You could try gluing some foam inside the 5 speed shifter boot. Foam inside that cover could cut down the noise at least somewhat if you can make it stay in place.

I know about the sound that comes up from a shifter hole. I once had a car with no boot on the shifter. Installing a shifter boot made a huge difference in sound levels on a (normally) fairly quiet gas engine car.
 

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I did put some foam both under and above the plywood, slitting it. The stick will move, opening foam as it moves, the foam closing behind. I also put foam around the shifter boot, filling the area around where the stick comes up through. I cut the plywood very carefully to minimize any gaps, the foam filling what was left. It is a bit of a shock how much noise will come through a small opening or crack. Made a big difference.
 

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I got some mass loaded vinyl and cut it to fit you can pull it out if the floor gets wet under the carpet it's not cheap for a roll the only way they sell it but is well worth the $
 

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Excellent read, kind of makes your head spin, but nicely done.
 

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Incredible info in this thread... I used much of this...

One thing I did that others might consider is to address the radiant heat that can enter the cab... I used radiant barrier (looks like a huge sheet of aluminum foil with string in it to hold it together) over the new carpet pad. I also used "bubble wrap" radiant barrier (this provides some insulation value) this was combined with a sheet of 1/2" thick rubber and a layer of carpet padding for the back wall - it did get very thick in the back and has made the back seat a little harder to fold up (but I don't do it often and it is not hard, but I wanted others to know it did change the feel).

Clarification here: I used the sheet on the floor. I used the bubble wrap on the back wall and I will use it on the ceiling (when I do the headliner).

Just somethings to consider.

BRM
 

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Incredible info in this thread... I used much of this...

One thing I did that others might consider is to address the radiant heat that can enter the cab... I used radiant barrier (looks like a huge sheet of aluminum foil with string in it to hold it together) over the new carpet pad. I also used "bubble wrap" radiant barrier (this provides some insulation value) this was combined with a sheet of 1/2" thick rubber and a layer of carpet padding for the back wall - it did get very thick in the back and has made the back seat a little harder to fold up (but I don't do it often and it is not hard, but I wanted others to know it did change the feel).

Clarification here: I used the sheet on the floor. I used the bubble wrap on the back wall and I will use it on the ceiling (when I do the headliner).

Just somethings to consider.

BRM
Where did you get the "radiant barrier"?
 

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E-Bay for me.
 

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Where did you get the "radiant barrier"?
I got it at Home Depot or Lowes... I went looking for the foil w string a few days ago for another project and Lowes did not have it in stock (online maybe???). I didn't go to HD...

Lowes did have the bubble wrap and they had it in 4 foot wide sheets... I had some 18" wide left from the garage project for the truck...

Just FYI i have an open stud garage and live in southern Nevada... I put up the bubble wrap on the walls (inside with only a stucco exterior) and then hung the foil w string in the open attic area... HUGE AND I MEAN HHHHUUUUGGGGEEE difference... I can work in the garage in the summer afternoon (its hot, but before it was an oven)... so, I am a TOTAL believer in the radiant barrier...

You must not have it touching the exterior of the truck - there must be something else or the foil just absorbs and passes along the heat... Or that is what I have read... on the garage i had left an air gap for the roof and the walls have foil then bubbles then foil...

NOTE: If I was to do the floor again (no freakin way I am opening that back up) I would put the bubbles on the floor too. even if they pop from being stepped on they would not ALL pop and would give some more insulation to that area... I am very happy with the result and was worried about the thickness on the floor but now I realize that I could have easily gotten 1/4" more of the bubbles down no problem...
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Excellent read, kind of makes your head spin, but nicely done.
If you think this made your head spin imagine what it was like researching all of this and then trying to put it together in a logical manner.

Incredible info in this thread... I used much of this...

One thing I did that others might consider is to address the radiant heat that can enter the cab... I used radiant barrier (looks like a huge sheet of aluminum foil with string in it to hold it together) over the new carpet pad. I also used "bubble wrap" radiant barrier (this provides some insulation value).
I have thought of this. A larger part of the reason I attacked the club cab sides was to reduce heat in the cab. I would think that adding foil wrap on the roof (probably 2 layers if it would fit) would help the a/c to cool a lot better.

My personal choice for the heat blocking aluminized stuff would be LOW-E (brand) insulation. It has much better R values (up to R-13) than the bubble wrap at lowes. The problem is you may not be able to buy it locally. Making it worse if you can buy it you may have to buy a huge roll. The solution is to look on ebay for this or other sizes.

4' x 10' EZ Cool Automotive Heat and Sound Insulation | eBay

This shows part of why I think for insulating properties this material is among the best. Their product was used on the space shuttle.
citroen cx insulation

While I dismiss this product as a minimally effective sound deadener I accept it as a wonderful thermal insulation. It is incredibly thin and 2 layers stopped a shop heater when it tried to warm up the inside of that car.
 

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Thanks so much for putting all of this together. I've ordered a DB meter online because after researching newer quieter truck prices I'm sticking with my current noise machine and have to make it better.
I spoke with Roberto at ATP a few times and can't justify spending the money they want for their kit. $1300 is a lot of cheddar with no definitive test results per piece to back it up.
Has anybody used radiation shielding blankets like med techs use for the valve cover, injection pump, and exhaust/turbo? They are way cheaper but may be hard to fashion into what we need for our trucks.
I will still do the interior mods, but something has to give for me to take this truck on any long pulls towing a big fifth wheel.
Hick you are the man for doing all this, people like you restore my faith in humanity.
 

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Thanks for taking the time to share your knowledge. Much appreciated!
 

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