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Well now I'm confused. I have an EGT gauge that was installed when I bought the truck. The sensor is in the downpipe just after the turbo.

From what I'm hearing you're supposed to have it in the manifold, but when I was showing it to my grandpa-in-law he said very adamantly "NO cause if you're showing 500* after the turbo then you're likely around 1500*!!! before the turbo and you'll melt the probe and send it through your blades."

Now for some reason I don't believe him cause anywhere around 1500* on a turbo for a long period of time would slag that turbo right? And I don't really see a 1k* drop in that short of space. But he's also been working on engines all his life and a diesel mechanic for the state of Idaho for about half...

Help?
 

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the best most accurate place for the probe is in the manifold. I think the difference is only a couple hundred degrees but im not exactly sure.
 

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ive got mine right after the turbo on the elbow. I see a couple hundred drop. No problem.
 

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Mule Barn Proprietor
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You wont melt the probe till you get over 2000 deg for a while. There is a few hundred degrees difference from pre to post turbo based on load, turbo efficiency, other factors. If you are running that Edge Box wide open, you are probably seeing some high pre turbo exhaust temps. Might wanna move the probe, or get dual probes.
 

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Got P7100?
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You wont melt the probe. Running down the highway with no load behind you there is only about 100* difference between the two, but when you really lay into it the manifold temp will climb and achieve a much higher temp at a faster rate then post turbo. Either move it or buy another gauge. I have a mechanical gauge in the manifold and the edge probe in the turbo elbow.
 

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Blue Collar Me
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A K thermocouple can handle 2000* all day long. We run them in our heat treat furnaces and endo gas generators. The failure rate is real low, and that only happens after hundreds of hours of continous use. They usually read 2424*. When they hit air after being that hot the end is on fire, kindof cool.
 
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