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Hello All,

We've had several retailers and customers contact us about which of our products would best serve to eliminate death wobble. Mostly, we recommend a front end upgrade as it was designed to combat the factors known to cause Death Wobble in the Dodge Ram, Heavy Duty Trucks. We felt it was necessary to provide a comprehensive education to those that want to fully understand the factors responsible for this front end problem rather than to simply fix it. Attached, you will find our final product written and pictured by the minds that developed the best-known cure for Death Wobble on the market today.

As with any announcement we send, feel free to print, present and email the enclosed content to anyone requiring an explanation as to why our products would assist in their pursuit of a solid front end! Thank you for your continued support of Carli Suspension; we wish you all a happy and safe Christmas and New Year!

Please post in this thread with any questions or concerns!

Best Regards,

Dan T.
 

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An upgraded trackbar, sector shaft steering brace, upgraded drag link and tie rod, and upgraded ball joints can make a big difference. Grade 8 control arm and trackbar hardware might help as well.

I haven't pulled the trackbar on my new '12 Laramie 3500 to check to see if Chrysler did the same thing with Rams as with JK Wrangers. To facilitate the manufacturing assembly process, they use 16 mm bolts in bracket holes and bushing bolt sleeves that are over 9/16". As a result, if the torque specs back off the recommended 125 ft lbs, there is enough room for trackbar related DW that ovals out the bracket bolt holes--making the subsequent DW even more violent and taking out the ball joints, tie rod and drag link ends, control arm and trackbar bushings, steering box, etc.

Poly Performance/Synergy and Northridge4x4 now have Grade 8 and F9 bolt replacement kits for a tighter bolt/bracket bolt hole/bushing fit. I recommend 9/16" Grade 8 bolts at least for the front JK trackbar.

I'm curious to learn the bolt sizes and bracket/bushing hole sizes on the Ram front end.


I've helped the JK guys diagnose and fix DW for several years now.

These are videos I did for Jeep JKs, but the Ram HD front suspensions are the same design.

Video 1 explains your front end and what components can wear or come loose and cause wobbles.

Video 2 shows how to inspect the front end.





And, here is a written explanation:

Death Wobble is no mystery.

It is caused by loose bolts, damaged components, or improper installation.

Look at the picture below and follow along:



First, the tie rod (green) has ends that attach to a knuckle on each side. As you could imagine, if either ends of the tie rod were broken or bad, that could be a culprit for a shimmy (not Death Wobble). A common place to damage the tie rod is on the driver's side at the adjusting sleeve (in the picture, just to the right of the red swaybar link). That sleeve (maybe not the correct term for it, but you can see what I am talking about) allows the width of the tie rod to be expanded or contracted. There are threads on that end that can be damaged, causing play on that driver's side and allow an up and down, or circular play movement. Again, this would cause a shimmy, not Death Wobble.

Next, look at the drag link (purple). On one end, it attaches to the pitman arm (lavender), that attaches to the steering gear box. On the other end, the drag link attaches to the passenger side knuckle. When you turn your steering wheel, a shaft turns that goes to the steering gear box. The steering gear box turns the pitman arm, and the pitman arm pushes or pulls the drag link, which pushes or pulls the knuckle. Your steering wheel is straitened by loosening the two nuts on the sleeve/turnbuckle on the drag link and rotating the sleeve/turnbuckle to lengthen or contract the length of the drag link. If either end of the drag link is damaged, this would cause a wobble or shimmy, but not Death Wobble.

Next, look at the trackbar (aqua). It attaches to a bracket on the frame on the driver's side and to the axle on the passenger side. The purpose of the trackbar is to center the axle on the frame. With the axle centered on the frame, it provides some resistance to the steering system to allow you to turn. If there was no trackbar and you turned the steering, the whole front frame would shift. As a result, there is significant force applied to the trackbar in driving and steering.

Now, imagine that the bolts that hold the trackbar are loose in their bolt holes, or that the bolt holes are wallowed out (oval), or that the bushings at the trackbar ends are damaged, or that the bracket at the axle side has come loose because the weld has broken, or that the bushings are all twisted up because the rig has been lifted without the installer loosening the bolts and then retightened them at the new ride height. All these things would allow play in the front trackbar. When you steer or go around a corner, these loose or broken things would allow the axle to shake or slide side to side. If you hit a bump in the road, it could knock the trackbar towards the driver's side. Then, the rest of the suspension (springs, etc.) would try to bring the trackbar back to the passenger side. If you were going at any sort of speed, you could develop a kind of harmonic resonance as the axle more and more violently slide/rocked/shaked from side to side. It would feel like your whole front end was being voilently torn apart. You would have to bring your vehicle to a complete standstill to stop the harmonic resonance. This is Death Wobble.

Even one incident of violent Death Wobble related to the front trackbar can cause significant damage. The voilent harmonic resonance of the back and forth shaking is more than the trackbar bushings, bolt holes, and brackets are designed to handle. A severe Death Wobble occurance can crack or break the welds on the axle side trackbar bracket, or the bolt can wallow out the bolt hole in the bracket, or the bushing can be permanently damaged.

This is the most common source of Death Wobble because inexperienced installers either do not remove the bolt from the trackbar when they install a lift--leaving the bushing pinched in the bracket and bound up, or they do not properly torque the bolts after the lift has been installed with the tires on and the full weight of the vehicle on the ground at ride height, or (maybe the most common) they do not retorque the trackbar bolts after the first 50 miles, after every heavy wheeling trip, and at every oil change interval.

Next, look at the lower control arms (purple) and the upper control arms (light blue). In the picture, they are aftermarket arms with a heim joint on one end. However, the stock control arms have a rubber bushing at each end. When the control arms are properly torqued, the bushing is somewhat pinched in the mounting brackets on the axle and the frame. Sometimes, an installer will make the mistake of not loosening the bolts for the control arms when they install a lift. What happens sometimes is they really bind up the bushings because they are pinched/sandwiched at stock ride height, but then forced to the new lifted ride height. These bound up bushings can cause weird handling, bushing failure, and lead to Death Wobble. The proper way is to loosen the bolts, install the lift, reinstall the wheels so the suspension and jeep are at the new ride height, rock the vehicle/suspension back and forth and side to side, then re-torque the bolts to spec, then after 50 miles re-torque them to spec, then after every oil change or very heavy wheeling trip re-torque them to spec.


Improperly balanced tires, too much air in tires, bent wheels, improperly installed wheel spacers, bad tires (with separated plys), and poor alignment specs (caster, camber, and not enough toe-in) can cause wobbles and shimmies that lead to Death Wobble. However, these precipitate Death Wobble, but they are not the cause of Death Wobble.

Although not specifically identified in the picture, the ball joints that are at the top and bottom of each knuckle where it attaches to the axle C can go bad. Bad ball joints can cause shimmies, wobbles, but usually not full on Death Wobble.

Next, allthough not identified in the picture, the unit bearings can go bad and be a cause of shimmy and wobble, but not Death Wobble.

Hope this helps--assuming you read it all.

Death Wobble is no mystery.

The reason that the steering stabilizer masks it is that it can absorb some of the side to side voilent harmonics of a loose trackbar or damaged mounts. However, this masking is dangerous because it will not prevent the eventual failure of trackbar bracket welds and bolt holes from trackbar Death Wobble.



It is extremely important to immediately diagnose and fix Death Wobble.

Even one episode of DW can damage other components.

Multiple episodes of DW are almost guaranteed to damage other components.

Multiple episodes will often damage your:

  • ball joints
  • tie rod ends--including the adjusting sleeve end on the driver side
  • trackbar bushings
  • trackbar bracket bolt holes
  • steering sector shaft (where the pitman arm attaches to the steering box)
  • steering stabilizer
  • front lower control arm bracket bolt holes
  • unit bearings
  • trackbar bracket welds
  • drag link ends

Hellbound13 is an example of a member who with 5-6 episodes of trackbar related DW on a stock jeep ended up "chasing his tail" for many, many months. He ended up replacing almost everything in the above list--sometimes more than once.

Without repairing/replacing everything that was damaged at once, the remaining damaged components continued to cause DW problems, further damaging the remaining components.




This is Death Wobble (and the guy is extremely foolish for repeating it on purpose):




Inspection Checklist

  1. Remove the steering stabilizer.
  2. Have someone turn the engine on and turn slowly from full lock to full lock while I visually, manually (with my hands on the components), and auditorily inspect for any play in the tie rod ends, drag link ends, sector shaft, trackbar ends/bolts/brackets, and trackbar bracket welds.
  3. Then, do the same thing but with short, sharp, quick back and forth turns of the steering wheel between the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions, instead of the slow, lock to lock approach.
  4. Then, I would remove the front trackbar to inspect the bolt holes for ovaling and inspect the trackbar bushings for separation or cracking with a long screw driver through the bolt sleeve and the trackbar in a vise to leverage against the bushing in all directions. If all is good, I would reinstall the trackbar with the tires on the ground at ride height to proper torque specs.
  5. Then, I would inspect the drag link end joints by using a large channel lock wrench that gave me enough leverage to check for up and down play in the drag link ends. There should not be any meaningful up and down play. If there is, the ends should be replaced, or a new drag link with heavy duty joints should be installed. After, I would check the torque of the drag link ends. Taller lifts magnify the problems of bad drag link ends.
  6. Then, I would inspect the tie rod ends with the channel lock wrench for up and down movement. There should be no meaningful up and down play. There should only be rotational movement in the joint end.
  7. Then, I would put the front axle on jack stands with the tires about 2" off the ground and check the front ball joints by using a long pry bar as a lever under the front tires to lift them up to inspect for up and down play in the lower ball joints. There shouldn't be more than maybe 1-2 mm.
  8. Then, I would grab the top of the tire with both hands and push it towards the frame and pull it away from the frame to inspect for lateral movement of the top ball joints. There shouldn't be any.
  9. Then, I would remove the front tires/wheels and remove the front tie rod--one knuckle at a time. Then with a large wrench or vice grips, I would inspect the end for side to side play. Then I would reinstall the end and torque to spec and repeat on the other side.
  10. Then, I would remove the brake calipers and brake disks to inspect the unitbearings for play.
  11. Then, I would reinstall the discs, brake calipers, and tires/wheels and set the axle back on the ground.
  12. Then, I would support but not lift the front axle with a floor jack and loosen the front control arm bolts (upper and lower on the axle side). One at a time, I would drop the control arms to inspect the bolt holes and bushings (similar to with the trackbar), reinstall without torquing, and do the next one. Afterwards, remove the floor jack so the suspension is at ride height, vigorously rock the vehicle side to side and front and back, then torque to spec.
  13. Next, I would inspect the sector shaft that comes out of the steering box for cracking or twisting.
  14. Then, I would take a test drive without the steering stablizer to feel for any wobbles.
  15. Finally, I would reinstall the steering stablizer or spring $40 for a heavy duty steering stablizer.

If this front end inspection does not diagnose and/or solve it, then I would move to an alignment.

  1. I would use adjustable lower front control arms to set my caster spec--with a cross caster that has less on the driver side than the passenger side.
  2. If my camber is out of spec, but it is not due to failed ball joints, I would install offset ball joints to get my camber in spec.
  3. I would set my toe-in to spec on the machine--which is about a 1/16"-1/8" toe-in depending on tire size.


With all this, I highly doubt you do not find the source.

The last ditch thing if there is a non-DW, speed dependent range wobble, I would borrow a different set of wheels and tires to see if it changes, and I would try driving it with no front driveshaft to see if that changes anything.

Although it is always a good idea to inspect your axle shaft u-joints, they will not cause DW.

The most common sources of full on DW are:

  • Improperly torqued trackbar bolts
  • Damaged trackbar and control arm bushings because bolts were torqued on a car lift or while the vehicle was not at ride height with the tires on the ground. When you torque trackbar and control arm bolts, the bracket pinches the bolt sleeve in the bushing, as well as the bushing itself. If this is at a geometry other than actual ride height, the bushings are twisted/bound/pre-loaded, and they will eventually fail/separate/etc. If you have a flex joint end, this does not apply for that end.
  • Ovaled out trackbar bracket holes due to DW episodes from loose bolts.


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Hey Planman,

I've seen some of you posts over on a few of the JK forums that I also frequent from time to time and most of your solutions and explanations are very good.

I've personally owned a few JK's and have worked on others. Although Chysler did make the holes for some the mounting hardware a little oversized it only seems to be a problem for limp wristed owners that don't know how to use a torque wrench. I have run nothing but the factory size hardware on my JK's and/or friends and customers JK's and I've never had an ovaled out hole or a DW situation that I would say was caused by the hardware size. Swtiching to Grade 8 hardware is actually a downgrade from the Metric Grade 10.9 hardware that come from the factory. Granted the factory hardware is coarse thread and is harder to kep tight unless you use Loctite (I always do) or you use replacement locking nuts on critical points like the trackbar.

That being said:

I haven't pulled the trackbar on my new '12 Laramie 3500 to check to see if Chrysler did the same thing with Rams as with JK Wrangers. To facilitate the manufacturing assembly process, they use 16 mm bolts in bracket holes and bushing bolt sleeves that are over 9/16". As a result, if the torque specs back off the recommended 125 ft lbs, there is enough room for trackbar related DW that ovals out the bracket bolt holes--making the subsequent DW even more violent and taking out the ball joints, tie rod and drag link ends, control arm and trackbar bushings, steering box, etc.
The factory hardware on the HD Dodges are very close to the size of the bushing sleeves. So close that the shank of the bolt can seize to the sleeve when it corrodes in wet or winter environments. Also all of the factory hardware like this has full length shanks as opposed to how they do it on the JK's. The factory torque spec on the track bar bolts is in excess of 200lbs.

Something to keep in mind on some of the 2010+ trucks is that inside width of the frame side track bar bracket is up to a tenth wider than the trackbar joint making it hard to get that end tight enough. Carli includes a .1" thick stainless shim that you insert behind the 2-piece bushing in their trackbar to ensure proper swelling of the poly track bar bushing.

I'm curious to learn the bolt sizes and bracket/bushing hole sizes on the Ram front end.

On a 2012 the hardware sizes are as follows:
16mm both ends of track bar
14mm both ends of upper control arm
16mm frame end of lower control arm
18mm axle end of lower control arm

The 03-09 trucks had 16 mm hardware are the axle end of the lower control arms and the track bar hardware sizes varied between 14mm and 16mm over the years.

I went to a measuring session at Ram for the '13 3500's with the new radius arm suspension and all of the hardware on that truck is even bigger. Lots of 18mm hardware.:thumbsup:
 

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Great info. Thanks. I will take this into consideration when lifting the Ram.

You are absolutely correct that JK owners who periodically re-torque their suspension bolts to spec will rarely experience DW. However, several people with completely stock, brand new JKs have reported that after reading my threads and taking a torque wrench to their stock trackbar and control arm bolts, they were way under spec.

I also agree that it would be an improvement to use a shouldered bolt instead of the fully threaded bolts on stock JKs.


Regarding the Ram, large tires on a 7700+ lbs truck vs a much lighter JK, I can definitely see the value of heavier front end components.

I've read about the steering/sector shaft braces. They all seem to be 1/4' steel with a bearing type support for the sector shaft. I would think that this would be very helpful to prevent flexing the steering box and twisting the sector shaft.

I've read of HD ball joints, lock-out hubs to replace unit-bearings, and HD replacement trackbars.

I see that PSC has a hydro-assist kit--which I would think would be necessary with a 8000+ lbs, offroaded Ram on 37s or larger. I haven't seen write-ups yet. Maybe I haven't looked hard enough.

I have only seen replacement drag link/tie rod products for the Ram from Synergy/Poly, but I have read of failures of the stock components.

Does anyone have a chromoly tie rod and drag link product for the Rams with less than a 4" lift or 5.5" or more backspaced wheels, or do people just do custom stuff?



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As I was getting off the freeway today I got death wobble really bad and the steering wheel tweaked off center a little. I parked at work n everything seemed okay. Went to pull out of my parking spot turning the wheel, truck turned a little then the steering wheel kept turning without resistance with the truck going straight. Drag link bar snapped.

I upgraded the track bar and stabilizer hoping this would cure death wobble. Should all ball joints be next? I'm on a tight budget.


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As I was getting off the freeway today I got death wobble really bad and the steering wheel tweaked off center a little. I parked at work n everything seemed okay. Went to pull out of my parking spot turning the wheel, truck turned a little then the steering wheel kept turning without resistance with the truck going straight. Drag link bar snapped.

I upgraded the track bar and stabilizer hoping this would cure death wobble. Should all ball joints be next? I'm on a tight budget.


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Read Carli's pdf in post #1, watch my videos and read post #2, and you will find the answers of what to do.
 

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How can i have death wobble with stock wheels on 35's but as soon as i put an off set wheel and tire combo on its gone?
 

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How can i have death wobble with stock wheels on 35's but as soon as i put an off set wheel and tire combo on its gone?
Is it violent, rip your front end apart, clanking metal DW that is random, not speed dependent, and/or requires coming to almost a complete stop to cease the oscillations; or is it a speed dependent shimmy or something less violent than DW?

Is it like the video of the green jeep above?

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What about bad tires or improperly balanced tires?

I only experienced DW once when I was running BFG AT KOs

Nothing changed in my setup, other than new tires........which cured the problem and it never returned
 

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What about bad tires or improperly balanced tires?

I only experienced DW once when I was running BFG AT KOs

Nothing changed in my setup, other than new tires........which cured the problem and it never returned
Tire wobbles and shimmies are nearly always speed dependent and easily repeatable.

These kinds if shimmies and wobbles are not the same as the violent, rip-your-front-end-apart Death Wobble that requires coming to almost a complete stop to cease the oscillations.

Bad tires can trigger DW, but are almost never the cause.

Worn, bad, poorly maintained, and/or improperly installed front end components are the cause(s) of DW.

Multiple episodes if DW typically damage multiple front end components.

Most, but not always, it starts with improperly torqued trackbar bolts, worn trackbar bushings, and/or poorly designed trackbar brackets.

But, it can also start with worn ball joints, unit bearings, tie rod and drag link ends, a damaged steering box or sector shaft, too much it too little caster or toe-in alignment specs, and/or worn or loose control arm bushings/bolts.
 

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Lol snofarmer. I read it and although is has a fair amount of Carli marketing, it is technically accurate and has some good info in there. And nothing wrong with using your own products in a guide you wrote. Personally I would love even more detail but this is a good start.


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It is very violent about 93km/h if i hit a bump shes goin nuts ill have to slam on the brakes to almost a complete stop before it stops shaking the piss outta it the tires are brand new duratracs its gotta be something underneath but its weird never happens with an offset wheel & tire combo just the stock wheels and these duratracs its goin into the shop today to get new shocks and some other goodies ill get buddy to take a look at everything. Ive already had the ball joints done new track bar and its only got 50,000km on it so i dunno keep ya posted though thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As I was getting off the freeway today I got death wobble really bad and the steering wheel tweaked off center a little. I parked at work n everything seemed okay. Went to pull out of my parking spot turning the wheel, truck turned a little then the steering wheel kept turning without resistance with the truck going straight. Drag link bar snapped.

I upgraded the track bar and stabilizer hoping this would cure death wobble. Should all ball joints be next? I'm on a tight budget.


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Please read through the PDF attached to the first post, this should shed light on your situation.

How can i have death wobble with stock wheels on 35's but as soon as i put an off set wheel and tire combo on its gone?
It's most likely the tires, wheels have nothing to do with it.

What about bad tires or improperly balanced tires?

I only experienced DW once when I was running BFG AT KOs

Nothing changed in my setup, other than new tires........which cured the problem and it never returned
This is all addressed in the write-up.

mtplanman got it right.:thumbsup:

That write up by Carli Suspension has so much BS in it I have to call it fiction with 1% fact thrown in.
Please explain which parts are "BS." We've never failed to eliminate DW using the above diagnostics and fixes.

Lol snofarmer. I read it and although is has a fair amount of Carli marketing, it is technically accurate and has some good info in there. And nothing wrong with using your own products in a guide you wrote. Personally I would love even more detail but this is a good start.


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True, we threw out suggestions on products where applicable but it's by no intention a marketing ploy. If anything, it will limit the amount of parts people buy as they may purchase a track bar instead of a whole front end upgrade now realizing they may not need everything to fix their problem. In a lot of cases, people with BFG AT/KO will purchase a front end upgrade kit (Track bar, ball joints and High mount steering stabilizer) only to find their tires were causing it. That's why we address this first.

It is very violent about 93km/h if i hit a bump shes goin nuts ill have to slam on the brakes to almost a complete stop before it stops shaking the piss outta it the tires are brand new duratracs its gotta be something underneath but its weird never happens with an offset wheel & tire combo just the stock wheels and these duratracs its goin into the shop today to get new shocks and some other goodies ill get buddy to take a look at everything. Ive already had the ball joints done new track bar and its only got 50,000km on it so i dunno keep ya posted though thanks.
What ball joints did you put in? What did the mechanic tighten your track bar to? what tire pressures are you running?
 

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I just wanted to bump this again to ask if Poly/Synergy was the only upgraded, non-custom tie rod and drag link option out there.

I'll probably end up just building my own, but wanted to see if I could save some time.
 

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How can i have death wobble with stock wheels on 35's but as soon as i put an off set wheel and tire combo on its gone?
Are you using the same tires on both sets of wheels? If so, my theory on this is; the increase in track width is creating more scrub/drag in the front end and creating more preload an all the front end components holding everything a little tighter. IMO it is just masking the problem.
 

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Well it first happened with Mickey Thompsons on the stock wheels got rid of those put on Cepek FCII then i went to the Duratracs this year all gave me the DW my Nittos and the Novakanes dont give me any DW so i dont see how it could be tires. The ball joints are stockers and have been changed twice since new and the trucks only got 53000km on it as for tire pressure i run 45pis front and 40psi rear. However i did just get a set of king shocks installed from Don Thuren and a upper steering stab to go with my lower from carli so we will see what happens so far so good but only driven about 50km. Ill probably be getting a adjustable track bar and getting rid of that crappy stock sway bar also. The stock trackbar is torqued friggin tight too.
 

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I've had my '05 3500 4x4 for about three months now and I get death wobble when I do 70 and up and hit a pretty sizable bump or expansion joint. The previous owner had the '09 update, new pitman arm, new steering box, and steering stabilizer installed this fall by a Cummins specialty shop. The tires and rims are stock from an '07 ram and are 90% tread and we're balanced. I had it aligned and they adjusted my caster forward and that helped but didn't solve it. He said my ball joints were fine but from the reading I've done on this site it seems like even the smallest amount of play could cause the death wobble. The most frustrating part of this whole experience is that the truck is so solid at freeway speed, tracks perfectly straight down the road, unless I hit a bump and then it goes to hell. Any help or information would be greatly appreciated, and might help get me off the couch with my wife who thinks I dropped twenty grand on a death trap.
 

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I've had my '05 3500 4x4 for about three months now and I get death wobble when I do 70 and up and hit a pretty sizable bump or expansion joint. The previous owner had the '09 update, new pitman arm, new steering box, and steering stabilizer installed this fall by a Cummins specialty shop. The tires and rims are stock from an '07 ram and are 90% tread and we're balanced. I had it aligned and they adjusted my caster forward and that helped but didn't solve it. He said my ball joints were fine but from the reading I've done on this site it seems like even the smallest amount of play could cause the death wobble. The most frustrating part of this whole experience is that the truck is so solid at freeway speed, tracks perfectly straight down the road, unless I hit a bump and then it goes to hell. Any help or information would be greatly appreciated, and might help get me off the couch with my wife who thinks I dropped twenty grand on a death trap.
Have you watched the 2 videos at the beginning of post #2?


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