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Shouldn't that port be blocked off and the pump drive the inlet side of the motor? What I'd expect is the flow to come into the back of the port opening and flow in both directions which may not provide the flow your after. I would have just blocked off that port and driven the water where the feed hose from the radiator enters the motor. That way the flow would be identical to what it is with the oem pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #422
Shouldn't that port be blocked off and the pump drive the inlet side of the motor? What I'd expect is the flow to come into the back of the port opening and flow in both directions which may not provide the flow your after. I would have just blocked off that port and driven the water where the feed hose from the radiator enters the motor. That way the flow would be identical to what it is with the oem pump.
There are two feed lines just the way the pump came....If I do it over I'd rather have one larger line from lower rad hose like you said. But it is what I have, so try to make the best of it. I can still block the second line, but it will mean less flow since the lines have a reducer on them. So,, I guess I can experiment with both ideas. At this point if I buy another pump my wife is going to find a new use for her baseball bat!!! Thanks for your input!
 

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Roger that, I think your going to have problems... tread lightly to begin testing...
 
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Discussion Starter #424 (Edited)
Roger that, I think your going to have problems... tread lightly to begin testing...
Well, if you think about the OEM type pump it spins in the cavity and sends coolant off in all directions pressurizing the block, and has a (passive flow) from the lower radiator hose, as it only lets coolant in when the stat opens and allows it to flow from the radiator. Since I have no stat, but constant flow forcing the coolant through the block and bypass circuit I'm thinking in this way it more closely duplicates the OEM flow more closely, with the exception of forcing it in the lower hose? I see it working more like a booster pump more than a stand alone.

P.S. I also think if I only ran a pump to the lower rad hose it would starve the bypass circuit of coolant and possibly causing hot spots that would not register on the temp gauge.
 

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OK maybe I am missing something... you have a feed where the oem pump went, and a feed inline with the oem rad hose to the motor? If so take 2 hoses and put them at 90* to each other and see what happens to the flow... one interferes with the other. The only way it would work would be to have a shallow angle at the merge point for both flow streams. I would think the oem pump is going to create a pressure it is drive point which is relieved at the output port(s) of the cavity.

Also if the flow is too great it may inhibit the coolants ability to absorb the heat.

If I am totally missing it, sorry, plates overflowing atm...
 

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Discussion Starter #426 (Edited)
What you're saying is true and I stayed awake many a night pondering this very thing until I got a good look at the coolant passages. They , (pump cavity, and radiator inlet) basically have separate passages... the pump cavity is much like a turbo housing with one outlet, until they "join" in a "Y" and flow into the oil cooler cavity and they do just what you said when they come together in a "Y" and flow together into that cavity and then the cylinders, and then the head. Look at it this way, if they were to be flowing in opposing directions then with the absence of the lower radiator hose pump the OEM pump would push coolant backwards through the radiator as well, when the stat opens!!! I also believe it's a huge myth that water can't absorb heat if it moves too fast. Unless there are air pockets in it, and stagnant, it will absorb heat no matter how fast it moves.

The last thing we want is to have coolant sitting still absorbing heat in one spot. It's much more efficient to keep it moving. It takes longer to warm up to operating temps, but this is why the endurance racing teams love it so much. It's so much better than using a stat and pinching off the flow until it over heats and then releasing it. Henry Ford has been surpassed with this new technology only because electronics make it possible with a variable speed pump. No thermostat is needed. You preset your desired operating temp on the touch screen, and then it goes to work speeding up or slowing the pump and working together in unison with the fans to keep it at that desired temp.

PS I also think electronics respond faster than waiting for a wax ball to expand or contract. IE driving along @ 190 F. and you come to a long steep hill and watch the temps climb to 220 wondering if the stat will ever open, or flow fast enough to lower the temps and then slowly if you're lucky the stat opens enough, and the fan kicks in and you crest the hill, and temps subside. With electronics it can respond instantly to the load demand by speeding up the pump and fans and then slowing etc to keep it there. It's the same balancing act as with a mechanical stat, but just more efficient. I didn't trust it at first, but I've taken enough trips and looking at the display every other second to see what's going on to say it's reliable, as long as you deploy the correct components and they work together correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #428
Success! We have a winner!!! Took the wifey for a drive in 110' heat.... city driving, flats, and hills, the new pump worked flawlessly!!! I feel confident enough to wire the fans to the PWM and let it do the switching now that I've tested it and am very confident so I won't have to monitor all the gauges every second to see what it's doing. I was manually switching the fans on and off before and found with the other pump even with fans on 100% it still got too hot. Not anymore.😁(y)
 

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Mind if I ask how much approx did it cost all together? How good would this system operate in sub zero temperatures that I face in our cold Canadian winters?
 

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Discussion Starter #430
Mind if I ask how much approx did it cost all together? How good would this system operate in sub zero temperatures that I face in our cold Canadian winters?
well, obviously I never did any arctic testing, but that would just be a matter of dialing it in. When it's cold the PWM slows the pump way down, and even stops it for 10 to 30 seconds, then runs for 5 seconds etc., for colder weather. I would imagine you'd have to run a smaller restrictor plate or an actual thermostat so it warms up normally. I have a 1" restrictor in mine now, and no thermostat so I could go bigger or smaller depending on outside temps. In the winter here it gets to 35 deg and I run a 1/2" restrictor so it will warm up faster. Price is, well, depending on what components you use. I also spent a lot of money on the radiator and electric fans and plumbing. The pump was $400 but comes with a two year unlimited miles warranty, and is rebuildable if needed. I also deleted pulley's and belts etc a lot of stuff that isn't necessary to run the pump. The PWM was $200 I think?
 

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Discussion Starter #431
Was 113 deg today went up some longer, steeper hills, and temps stayed under 200 gotta love that.
 

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Discussion Starter #432
I had an idea come to me as to why the engine mounted electric pumps fail so early. It might be too much heat for the electric motor and or bearings? With a remote pump not being mounted to the engine block the heat soak is eliminated and free to cool off faster than the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #433
ok so I'm searching for a round heat sink to clamp onto the pump motor because it does get hot!
 

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Discussion Starter #434 (Edited)
I found something that may help keep temps down in the pump motor and give some longer life?.... This you would attach with a hose clamp, or Zip ties, and some heat sink paste or adhesive for better contact, and heat transfer. I had to machine a small window in it for the pigtail. I couldn't find one the right size (4") so I cut it in half like a clam shell. I will be mounting this on my new pump motor for sure to help with temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #435
Went for a drive 115 Deg* today coolant temps 185 😁
 

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Looks good.

I’d love to see how it does towing 10k or so in the heat.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #438
Looks good.

I’d love to see how it does towing 10k or so in the heat.


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I would also!!! I will eventually do that with a camper trailer. My truck is a poor candidate for testing though, it runs hot, even with the OEM pump it ran hotter, much hotter!
 

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Discussion Starter #439 (Edited)
Testing the heat sink on the water pump today, it ran 20 to 30 deg cooler on the motor housing, pump housing was 154 deg and motor housing was 120 that's significant...Maybe enough to prolong it's life. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #440
Ok I have a negative issue to report. The water pump block off plate while beautiful had tolerances that were a little off.....enough that it caused a leak. first the bolts were too long and bottomed out in the holes before the o-ring seated in the block, and the holes in the bracket were a tad tight causing them to bind when screwing bolts in, so I drilled them out a size up, and ground about 3/16 off the length of the bolts. Just to be extra safe I put sealer on the gasket, both sides, and lock tight on the threads. Crossing fingers now... (y) 😁
 
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