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The Double Cardan joints definitely need greasing if so equipped with grease fittings. But the proble


Of course the double Cardan joints should be greased if so equipped with grease fittings. The problem is that some of them are not accessible. On my '98 the cardon joint is boxed in between the floor boards above, the cross member below, and the frame rail to outboard side. I can deal with the forward cardan grease fitting fine. But it is impossible to get a grease hose solidly onto the zerk fitting of the aft u- joint. It sort of goes on, but I can find plenty of grease that seeps out the connection. I have no way of knowing if any actually gets into the joint. The zerk fitting and most of the joint is not visible. I have to access it by feel. I have put a 1/8 inch pipe with 90 degree elbow and hose fitting on the grease gun, but poor access still does not permit good hand pressure to secure the hose fitting to the zerk while operating the grease gun. Have not solved this yet.

Have considered an angular zerk fitting, but these have quite a high profile, and may get mangled during rotation. A 90 would only make things worse. A 45 maybe might help. A 65 may protrude against the joint during rotation. I think that a 30 degree might work, but they are impossible to find. Local auto parts shops and industrial bearing suppliers have none. Experimenting with different fittings could take a lot of time, as the whole drive shaft must be removed for installing and testing each kind of fitting. The cardan flange bolts are quite difficult to get at with wrenches. Any ideas out there?
I found an end piece on Amazon for my grease gun that very likely will work for your impossible to get to grease fitting. Search for "Thexton THE418 grease coupler"
I found only one of these on Amazon, it is red and it has a slot along the side that slips over the grease fitting. If that doesn't work for you, I'd really be surprised. I bought one to get to the drive axle u-joint zerk that somebody installed facing towards the hub! Good luck.
 

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I found an end piece on Amazon for my grease gun that very likely will work for your impossible to get to grease fitting. Search for "Thexton THE418 grease coupler"
I found only one of these on Amazon, it is red and it has a slot along the side that slips over the grease fitting. If that doesn't work for you, I'd really be surprised. I bought one to get to the drive axle u-joint zerk that somebody installed facing towards the hub! Good luck.
I looked up the Thexton coupler. I need to access my cardan zerk fitting directly head on, since it is in a hole. Can't sneak in from the side as the Thexton is made to do. My main problem is that I am unable to comfortably get my hand in there to keep the coupler firmly pressed onto the zerk, so grease escapes past the connection. I think that I will need to experiment with several angles of zerks until I find one that has enough clearance to not touch the rest of the cardan as it rotates. An angle zerk would enable the coupler to be pressed more directly to make maximum use of arm and hand strength. Could take a long time of trial fitting though.
 

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I know this topic is just about completely beat to death now, but I gave up trying to grease the cardan joint in the truck a bunch of years ago. Found it’s far easier to just pull the driveshaft, and grease it on the bench.
plus anyone who hasn’t removed the driveshaft yet, may be in for a surprise. Between rust and factory threadlocker, they’re fairly well stuck! Easier to remove when you don’t “have” to.
 

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I know this topic is just about completely beat to death now, but I gave up trying to grease the cardan joint in the truck a bunch of years ago. Found it’s far easier to just pull the driveshaft, and grease it on the bench.
plus anyone who hasn’t removed the driveshaft yet, may be in for a surprise. Between rust and factory threadlocker, they’re fairly well stuck! Easier to remove when you don’t “have” to.
Removing that front driveshaft once in a while is a great idea. It's the only way to tell if any of the joints are starting to wear. Speaking of such I have to remove mine on my second truck today before the wife heads to camp for 8 weeks tomorrow. Haven't touched it since the woman and I bought it in September. If it's good I'm going to be trying out the NGLI#2 Marine grease from Amsoil.
 
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Thanks for the tip. When the winter weather breaks, I think that I will be removing mine to give it some grease. Gonna try some synthetic grease this time. Have some Loctite LB8304 Superlube. Hopefully the synthetic will increase life of the cardon. And this is such a nuisance, want to use the best grease I can find. I can barely get a quarter turn at a time on the cardan flange bolts. I can find Superlub locally for about $17 a tube. Might try experimenting with angle zerks too.
 

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Thanks for the tip. When the winter weather breaks, I think that I will be removing mine to give it some grease. Gonna try some synthetic grease this time. Have some Loctite LB8304 Superlube. Hopefully the synthetic will increase life of the cardon. And this is such a nuisance, want to use the best grease I can find. I can barely get a quarter turn at a time on the cardan flange bolts. I can find Superlub locally for about $17 a tube. Might try experimenting with angle zerks too.
The best grease I've used is Amsoil.
My dad swears by it too. His 1993 T800 Kenworth had 2.4 million kms on the original kingpins. He drove truck for 60 years and says it can't be beaten.
Amsoil NGLI#2 Summertime.
Amsoil NGLI#1 Wintertime.

I've used the Amsoil Racing grease for bearings and ujoints and the #2 for balljoints and tierods. I would just order from Amsoil website and it is shipped right to my door.
 
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I know this topic is just about completely beat to death now, but I gave up trying to grease the cardan joint in the truck a bunch of years ago. Found it’s far easier to just pull the driveshaft, and grease it on the bench.
plus anyone who hasn’t removed the driveshaft yet, may be in for a surprise. Between rust and factory threadlocker, they’re fairly well stuck! Easier to remove when you don’t “have” to.
While it’s out , die grind a small amount on the yoke and install a standard fitting. You’ll never have trouble greasing it again.
 

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While it’s out , die grind a small amount on the yoke and install a standard fitting. You’ll never have trouble greasing it again.
Thanks JH, Sounds like a fantasic idea. Will give it a try when the heating of my big outdoor work shop comes up in spring. Might even get an angle zerk to fit. An angle fitting should improve seal against the gun coupling.
 

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Die grind a small amount on the yoke and install a standard fitting. You’ll never have trouble greasing it again.
While I totally agree with you J... (y)
If I posted that 'tip' I'd get hammered with a thousand posts about how that would throw the balance of the driveshaft off and the pending catastrophic failure, and the weak point it would create at the grind spot, etc, etc, etc... :LOL:
 

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Angle fittings won’t work. The area is too tight. That’s why it got the button zerk to begin with.
Thanks.
While I totally agree with you J... (y)
If I posted that 'tip' I'd get hammered with a thousand posts about how that would throw the balance of the driveshaft off and the pending catastrophic failure, and the weak point it would create at the grind spot, etc, etc, etc... :LOL:
I doubt that the small mass of material removed would be sufficient to throw off balance enough to cause noticeable vibration. I do not remember seeing any evidence of factory balancing on mine, so balance does not seem critical. No added weight, and no removed material. I do not remember that mine has counter weights to compensate for the mass added by the grease fittings. The grease fitting is located near center, so balance effect would be slight. If a small void from grinding will weaken it to failure, then it is too weak to begin with. An important point is to have gradual transitions in the ground out area. That means a rounded bottom in the hole, and rounded edges against the main surface. This will reduce stress risers.

If concerned, about balance, weld a small blob close by, or remove the same amount of material from the opposite side. And I doubt that a spot of MIG would have any weakening effect on the relatively large forging of the cardon. If concerned about thermal stresses, remove the u-joint and pre heat the part before welding the compensating weight blob. If the unit cannot be adapted to make greasing possible, it will suffer early failure anyway. I very much doubt though that a lot of effort need be spent on balance compensation.
 

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Thanks.

I doubt that the small mass of material removed would be sufficient to throw off balance enough to cause noticeable vibration. I do not remember seeing any evidence of factory balancing on mine, so balance does not seem critical. No added weight, and no removed material. I do not remember that mine has counter weights to compensate for the mass added by the grease fittings. The grease fitting is located near center, so balance effect would be slight. If a small void from grinding will weaken it to failure, then it is too weak to begin with. An important point is to have gradual transitions in the ground out area. That means a rounded bottom in the hole, and rounded edges against the main surface. This will reduce stress risers.

If concerned, about balance, weld a small blob close by, or remove the same amount of material from the opposite side. And I doubt that a spot of MIG would have any weakening effect on the relatively large forging of the cardon. If concerned about thermal stresses, remove the u-joint and pre heat the part before welding the compensating weight blob. If the unit cannot be adapted to make greasing possible, it will suffer early failure anyway. I very much doubt though that a lot of effort need be spent on balance compensation.
Nose Eyebrow Mouth Jaw Temple
 
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My front driveshaft that was built by a local company here in FSJ is balanced to half the oem spec. He also adds a bunch of grease nipples.

Automotive tire Wood Motor vehicle Bicycle part Gas

You can see the weight where I paint marked the double cardan grease port is.
 

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Remember too, 4th Gens, the front driveshaft doesn't spin when in 2wd.
3rd Gen trucks, the front DS was locked to the front axle so always spinning. The old 07, I had basically since new. Fair amount of 4wd use, 4 winters in snow country and a wife using it as her daily driver. I greased that cardan joint fitting maybe every 30k miles or so and at 180k+ when I sold it, the front DS showed no slop and all original joints.
Back to 4th gens, unless you're putting on alot of 4wd miles, grease it once and then maybe after you have 10,000 miles in 4wd or something along those lines. Definitely doesn't need to be done regularly unless you're putting most of your miles on in 4wd.
 
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Remember too, 4th Gens, the front driveshaft doesn't spin when in 2wd.
3rd Gen trucks, the front DS was locked to the front axle so always spinning. The old 07, I had basically since new. Fair amount of 4wd use, 4 winters in snow country and a wife using it as her daily driver. I greased that cardan joint fitting maybe every 30k miles or so and at 180k+ when I sold it, the front DS showed no slop and all original joints.
Back to 4th gens, unless you're putting on alot of 4wd miles, grease it once and then maybe after you have 10,000 miles in 4wd or something along those lines. Definitely doesn't need to be done regularly unless you're putting most of your miles on in 4wd.
Agreed. I know of guys with the non CAD axle trucks and neglected to ever grease that joint and they still lasted 100k. Obviously my OCD wouldn't allow for that.
 

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My front driveshaft that was built by a local company here in FSJ is balanced to half the oem spec. He also adds a bunch of grease nipples.

View attachment 943261
You can see the weight where I paint marked the double cardan grease port is.
Excellent idea to drill and tap the u-joint cap. Wonder if you would please describe your procedure? The cap is hardened steel, so expect that it would require a tough drill bit and tap. What kind of drill bit and tap did you find would work? Cobalt, carbide, or what? Was the operation done in a lathe?
 

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Excellent idea to drill and tap the u-joint cap. Wonder if you would please describe your procedure? The cap is hardened steel, so expect that it would require a tough drill bit and tap. What kind of drill bit and tap did you find would work? Cobalt, carbide, or what? Was the operation done in a lathe?
The driveline shop that builds my driveshafts does it. He is a machinist by trade. He assembles the shaft with the extra nipples pre installed and then balances to half of the tolerance. He said it takes more time but makes the joints last longer. He also built my one piece aluminum rear driveshaft.

Talking to Clay at EMF about adding a grease nipple for my 4140 Chromoly heim joint at the axle end of my trackbar he said just to use a quality drill bit, slow and lots of quality cutting oil such as Rigid.
I've always used Walter HSS bits for drilling hardened steel and stainless. In the super cold weather if I was working in the field I use ATF for cutting fluid when threading pipe or drilling.
 
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