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I was told if the sticker was there, then it needs greased. I spent 40 mins looking for it the first time, then stabbed myself with the stupid needle! lol ... To be honest, I have greased the cardon joint numerous times, I KNOW it is there, yet I still spend a ridiculous amount of time looking EVERY time! It's so flippin small and gets so much dirt and grunge! Also I recommend you RUN from that dealer as fast as possible. Have fun!
This is why I marked mine with paint marker to make it easier find each time.
 

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This is why I marked mine with paint marker to make it easier find each time.
I am due for a oil change.. so if I'm not frozen by the time I am done, I will clean the fluid film off and try to get a paint marker on it!
 

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Ok see alot of folks stating lubricant the driveshaft. It's not the driveshaft it's the U joints. You have them in main shift and front shafts also. So thay may be where the confusion lays. Also if they have been changed they might not have grease fittings.
 

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Ok see alot of folks stating lubricant the driveshaft. It's not the driveshaft it's the U joints. You have them in main shift and front shafts also. So thay may be where the confusion lays. Also if they have been changed they might not have grease fittings.
You are correct. I think that people who are used to lubrication of drive shafts assume that any discussion of the subject naturally means lubrication of the u-joints, as other than the spline joint, there is nothing else to lubricate. So beware that drive shafts, both front and rear have spined joints that move longitudinally with the vehicle suspension, and they require lubrication. U-joints are manufactured with or without grease fittings, whether original equipment or after market. I do not follow any logic of u-joints that are made without provision to lubricate. Grease tends to run out and wear ot over time, so must be replaced periodically to prevent failure. When replacing them, I always ask for a new one that has a grease fitting. I take it out of the box at the store to confirm.

Anyone have any thoughts on u-joint replacement? I have found that if one u-joint is worn, all on that shaft should be replaced at the same time. The vibrations are transmitted to every joint on the shaft, so they will all be ripe for replacement. Also, much of the work of replacing includes removal of the entire shaft, so might as well do them all at the same time. For rear drive shafts, a thorough job will include fitting a new steady bearing if the vehicle is so equipped. I have never seen a steady bearing that is greaseable, so their life time is quite limited, especially if the truck does a lot of heavy hauling and off roading.
 

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Ok see alot of folks stating lubricant the driveshaft. It's not the driveshaft it's the U joints. You have them in main shift and front shafts also. So thay may be where the confusion lays. Also if they have been changed they might not have grease fittings.
So much misinformation here. Ram/Dodge hasn't produced a light duty truck since at least 3rd Gen, likely 2nd Gen as well, that have any greaseable u-joints. The only driveline or axle shaft lube point on the whole truck is the front driveshaft cardan joint. The only way u-joints WOULD have grease fittings is if they were replaced with greaseable ones.
 

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So much misinformation here. Ram/Dodge hasn't produced a light duty truck since at least 3rd Gen, likely 2nd Gen as well, that have any greaseable u-joints. The only driveline or axle shaft lube point on the whole truck is the front driveshaft cardan joint. The only way u-joints WOULD have grease fittings is if they were replaced with greaseable ones.
Thanks, but I do not think that anybody claimed that Dodge has made a truck lately that has greasable u-joints. Owners of older vehicles would have no way of knowing if the joints on their trucks are original or after market. This specification would not be known to the owner. It is not likely written in the glove box owner's manual. So discussion about origin of the joints cannot be considered as misinformation. The bottom line is that some trucks have greasable u-joints and some have non greaseable u-joints. Does any owner really care if they were supplied on the Dodge assembly line, or fitted later? Anyone who does their own work will get their duds dirty and crawl under for a look and deal with what they find. If greaseable, they will give them a few shots once in a while. If not, they will just live with them and can replace with greaseable when they wear out.

I did look in my Generation 2 Chrysler Shop Manual. Section 3-9 has a drawing of a u-joint that has a zerk fitting. So for any trivia buffs out there, according to official Chrysler info, Gen 2's had factory supplied greasable u-joints. Hard to imagine Chrysler having produced a manual that documents after market parts. Too bad that later generation trucks may be lacking this feature as original. Chrysler saved a few cents per joint by supplying joints that will wear out prematurely, costing owners many times more.
 

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Dodge did not have a greasable double cardan joint in the front driveshaft on 4 wheel drive trucks until 2005-2006. I'm certain it is 2006MY. Since 2006 there has been a sticker under the hood by the driver side battery telling you to grease the double cardan joint at every oil change. 2006-2013MY trucks you have jack up the drivers side of the truck and turn the front wheel to get the driveshaft to the front axle to rotate to find the little ball-detent grease fitting. On 2013 to present trucks jacking up the frontend and rotating the tire is not necessary due to the Central Axle Disconnect. The double cardan grease requirement has absolutely nothing to do with greasing Universal Joints in the front driveshaft on 4 wheel drive trucks. If the double cardan is not greased regularly on 2006-2013 trucks the joint will seize and cause the front driveshaft to break and knock a whole in the floor board and destroy the transfer case and possibly the transmission case because the lack of a CAD keeps the front drive shaft rotating any time the truck is moving.
 

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And here I thought that the whole idea with a double Cardan joint is that it is a Constant Velocity (CV) joint.
A double ujoint is very different than a cv axle. Ujoints are not constant velocity joints. Hence the different names. Google double cardon and cv axle joint.
 

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And here I thought that the whole idea with a double Cardan joint is that it is a Constant Velocity (CV) joint.
The whole idea of a double cardon joint is to increase angle without compromising too much strength. Ujoints have a narrower optimal angle strength design.
 

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Thanks, but I do not think that anybody claimed that Dodge has made a truck lately that has greasable u-joints.
Sorry, I interpreted the post that I quoted as just that. Maybe you and others read it differently?
 

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The Double Cardan joints definitely need greasing if so equipped with grease fittings. But the proble
Dodge did not have a greasable double cardan joint in the front driveshaft on 4 wheel drive trucks until 2005-2006. I'm certain it is 2006MY. Since 2006 there has been a sticker under the hood by the driver side battery telling you to grease the double cardan joint at every oil change. 2006-2013MY trucks you have jack up the drivers side of the truck and turn the front wheel to get the driveshaft to the front axle to rotate to find the little ball-detent grease fitting. On 2013 to present trucks jacking up the frontend and rotating the tire is not necessary due to the Central Axle Disconnect. The double cardan grease requirement has absolutely nothing to do with greasing Universal Joints in the front driveshaft on 4 wheel drive trucks. If the double cardan is not greased regularly on 2006-2013 trucks the joint will seize and cause the front driveshaft to break and knock a whole in the floor board and destroy the transfer case and possibly the transmission case because the lack of a CAD keeps the front drive shaft rotating any time the truck is moving.
Of course the double Cardan joints should be greased if so equipped with grease fittings. The problem is that some of them are not accessible. On my '98 the cardon joint is boxed in between the floor boards above, the cross member below, and the frame rail to outboard side. I can deal with the forward cardan grease fitting fine. But it is impossible to get a grease hose solidly onto the zerk fitting of the aft u- joint. It sort of goes on, but I can find plenty of grease that seeps out the connection. I have no way of knowing if any actually gets into the joint. The zerk fitting and most of the joint is not visible. I have to access it by feel. I have put a 1/8 inch pipe with 90 degree elbow and hose fitting on the grease gun, but poor access still does not permit good hand pressure to secure the hose fitting to the zerk while operating the grease gun. Have not solved this yet.

Have considered an angular zerk fitting, but these have quite a high profile, and may get mangled during rotation. A 90 would only make things worse. A 45 maybe might help. A 65 may protrude against the joint during rotation. I think that a 30 degree might work, but they are impossible to find. Local auto parts shops and industrial bearing suppliers have none. Experimenting with different fittings could take a lot of time, as the whole drive shaft must be removed for installing and testing each kind of fitting. The cardan flange bolts are quite difficult to get at with wrenches. Any ideas out there?
 

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Let's keep a friendly conversation going here. We all on this forum read to contribute helpful info, and hopefully receive some such help. And for the most part, that is how it works. Using expressions such as "misinformation" starts making the forum seem like an out to get ya fake news site. "Misinformation" has been so overworked by political operators and media that it is just a bad word in a what should be a friendly setting. Lot's of guys on here work hard to keep thier vehicle running. And lots contribute helpful info. So let's please maintain some respect.
 

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A double ujoint is very different than a cv axle. Ujoints are not constant velocity joints. Hence the different names. Google double cardon and cv axle joint.
The whole idea of a double cardon joint is to increase angle without compromising too much strength. Ujoints have a narrower optimal angle strength design.
If I Googled "Double Cardon Joint", first it would correct me and ask if I meant Cardan joint.

Either way, you don't have to believe me, but a double Cardan joint is one of several types of CV joints.
And normally they're used when the U-joint angles can't be made the same at each end of the drive shaft.
 
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Thanks, but I do not think that anybody claimed that Dodge has made a truck lately that has greasable u-joints. Owners of older vehicles would have no way of knowing if the joints on their trucks are original or after market. This specification would not be known to the owner. It is not likely written in the glove box owner's manual. So discussion about origin of the joints cannot be considered as misinformation. The bottom line is that some trucks have greasable u-joints and some have non greaseable u-joints. Does any owner really care if they were supplied on the Dodge assembly line, or fitted later? Anyone who does their own work will get their duds dirty and crawl under for a look and deal with what they find. If greaseable, they will give them a few shots once in a while. If not, they will just live with them and can replace with greaseable when they wear out.

I did look in my Generation 2 Chrysler Shop Manual. Section 3-9 has a drawing of a u-joint that has a zerk fitting. So for any trivia buffs out there, according to official Chrysler info, Gen 2's had factory supplied greasable u-joints. Hard to imagine Chrysler having produced a manual that documents after market parts. Too bad that later generation trucks may be lacking this feature as original. Chrysler saved a few cents per joint by supplying joints that will wear out prematurely, costing owners many times more.
read post 23
 

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If I Googled "Double Cardon Joint", first it would correct me and ask if I meant Cardan joint.

Either way, you don't have to believe me, but a double Cardan joint is one of several types of CV joints.
And normally they're used when the U-joint angles can't be made the same at each end of the drive shaft.
Single joints = variable velocity. Double joints = constant velocity at the output shaft. CV joints were developed to avoid the second joint.
 

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I think you’re wrong. Universal joints by design aren’t constant velocity. They accelerate and decelerate upon every revolution. Doubling the number of joints doesn’t change this fact. CV joints were developed to eliminate this accel/ decel frequency.
A double Cardan works the same as a driveshaft with equal, but not opposite, angles.
Just like with equal and opposite angles, the vibrations (accel.decel) gets canceled out.

As mentioned, there are a few different variations of the CV joint, and the double Cardan is one of them.
Besides, not that I've looked up the numbers, but I'm pretty sure that a regular U-joint, especially with deep yokes, can deal with higher angles than a double Cardan can. Although, I think I've read about high angle versions of those, too.
 

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A single u-joint starts having vibration issues at 3k shaft rpm and 4 degrees of working angle. A double Carden joint increases the working angle to about 7 degrees @3k before vibration sets in.

A straight u -joint driveshaft needs both ends operating at equal and opposite angles to cancel vibration. The double Carden allows the single u-joint end to have closer to zero angle for reduced vibration and increased strength.

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A straight u -joint driveshaft needs both ends operating at equal and opposite angles to cancel vibration.
That's not the whole truth. Yes, equal and opposite angles do cancel the accel/decel, but so does equal and same angles.
After all, that's how a double Cardan joint works, really being just a very short driveshaft.

Of course, using the equal and same angles with a normal driveshaft doesn't function well in real life on a vehicle with suspension since (unlike equal and opposite angles) it only works at a specific ride height.
 
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