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Discussion Starter #1
All,

Yesterday "Hurricane Imelda" left my city substantially flooded. On my adventurous commute home from work through the concrete jungle, I encountered running-board high waters on multiple occasions (Less than an inch over running-boards not including small wake). My question is, Is there anything in particular I should inspect? Truck is performing the same as it did before. I just want to make sure I'm not overlooking something. Doesn't seem like it would be enough water to make its way to the air box or into the diffs. Also, it would be great to know what the fording depth is on these trucks if anyone has a clue. Thanks in advance for any input!
 

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When was it a hurricane?

Just a stinkin' lot of rain, my yard was swamped, never had so much water covering my place in the 21 years I've lived here.

As to how deep your truck could ford without major issue, I'd say that so long as water didn't get into the cab, you're fine.

Water over the diffs just means changing the gear lube and greasing any lube points.
 

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Haha, that's why I said "Hurricane Imelda". Definitely not a hurricane, but it's funny that's what the news is calling it now. Appreciate the response, that's what I figured. No water in the cab thankfully. Also, I honestly don't think it even fully submerged the diff as the running-boards are inline with the hubs. I would think to submerge the diffs, the water would have to be close to the top of the tires. Correct me if I'm wrong. Regardless, only 3K until I need to change the diff fluid anyway. I assume the truck would feel different if water was in the diffs.
 

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Where are yall at down south? Truck wont feel any different with a differential full of water. Your probably fine but I would pull the fill plugs and stick a finger in.
 

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Pulling boats they used to say if it was up to the axles you should lube axles and do a shorter change interval on the diff.


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When was it a hurricane?

Just a stinkin' lot of rain, my yard was swamped, never had so much water covering my place in the 21 years I've lived here.

As to how deep your truck could ford without major issue, I'd say that so long as water didn't get into the cab, you're fine.

Water over the diffs just means changing the gear lube and greasing any lube points.
Thanks for the reminder the word "ford" has another meaning.
Apparently Ram fords through floods nicely.
Stay safe in SE Texas, you have been through a lot of awful weather recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the reminder the word "ford" has another meaning.
Apparently Ram fords through floods nicely.
Stay safe in SE Texas, you have been through a lot of awful weather recently.
Much appreciated. And no doubt about that, this truck handled the water as if it wasn't there.
 

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After 2016 in Baton Rouge I had my front and rear diffs serviced (pretty sure that was the first) and there was definitely water in them from fording above the axles. Might’ve been a leaking axle seal because it definitely didn’t get in thru vent hoses.

If you were above the axle centerlines I’d recommend at least pulling the fill plugs and sampling the oil. Right after a drive is best as the water will emulsify into the oil. But afterward it’ll settle out into the bottom of the housing (oil floats on water).

Hope this helps and good luck over there. Stay safe.


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I’ve owned my first Ram/Cummings/diesel for almost two months so I’ve got a lot to learn. However, based on my experience with Jeeps I would make sure all breather tubes to include transmission all come up under the hood. As mentioned above you don’t have to totally submerse the diff to get water in. When a hot diff hits cold water strange things happen.
 

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Chances are it's fine and if your diff vents are in tact, very likely you didn't get any water in.
Water can be sucked in through the axle seals due to temperature differences. (The back a boat into a lake with a hot axle hitting the cold water scenario)

Easy enough to check the gear oil. If it's not cloudy, no water entered or at least not enough to affect it or evaporate out.
As mentioned in a previous post, 4 wheeling guys often run the axle vents up higher and seems prudent for vehicles in areas that see flooding and can be reasonably expected to submerge the axles to make sure the diff vents are clamped on tightly and actually terminate above the expected water levels somewhere.
 
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