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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reading some post on here and now I am even more confused than I was before. I have always had gassers, this is the first diesel I have ever owned. Is there some beginner info I could read up on to get a better understanding of things.

ie:
smoke screw
star
power screw
lift pump
turbo collars
difference in manifolds

just to name a few

I feel like I am reading info on the space shuttle around here. :lol3: Any help would be great

Thanks
Chris


PS is there a diesel 101 coarse?:CRY:
 

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Welcome to the dark side! What smokem said. Also, the first addition to any diesel should be a pyrometer(measures exhaust gas temperatures so you don't have a meltdown) Once you get one of these puppies cranked up a bit, there's no going back to a gas truck. :peelout:peelout
 

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hey fill in your sig so we can help!!
like he said we need to know what you got and what you plan on doing but the very first thing you need to do is get a pyrometer gauge and dont worry with a lil time you will learn a lot on here and be giving other people new to diesels help and info:thumbsup
 

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ie:
smoke screw
star
power screw
lift pump
turbo collars
difference in manifolds
Smoke Screw: A screw on the very top of the pump, underneath a circular black anti-tamper sheetmetal cap. When you turn down on the screw, you set your AFC cone farther down at all times. This gives you more fuel throughout the entire low-boost range.

Star Wheel: This is a star wheel underneath the smoke screw. The star wheel compresses a spring that resists the downward movement of the AFC cone. The farther down the starwheel is turned, the more pressure on the spring, the less boost is required for the AFC cone to be in the full-fuel position. In other words, the starwheel controls how fast the engine transitions from low-boost to high-boost range.

Power Screw: This is a screw on the back of the pump that gives you more fuel throughout the entire engine range. High boost, low boost, no boost, the power screw gives you more screw. This is where the vast majority of added power comes from. Turning this in also raises your idle speed (which can be turned down via the low-idle screw), and can lead to runaway.

Lift Pump: The injection pump is the expensive, funny looking thing on the top front of the engine. The injection pump pressurizes fuel to well over 10,000 PSI. The lift pump is a relatively simple and inexpensive pump on the bottom back of the engine that pressurizes fuel to ~15 PSI in order to feed the injection pump and make it's job easier.

Turbo Collars: I have no idea.

Difference in Manifolds:
Intake manifolds: The stock intake
"manifold" is the piece of bent pipe that feeds pressurized air into the head. The stock intercooled pipe is a restriction, and the stock non-intercooled pipe that crosses over the engine is a restriction of epic proportions. Nobody makes an aftermarket non-intercooled pipe.
Exhaust manifolds: The exhaust manifold is what the turbo hangs on. It is somewhat restrictive, but the big problem is that it tends to crack, or shrink and crack the head. The aftermarket sells manifolds that flow a little bit better and that are largely immune to the heat issues.
 

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Or you can just leave it be. I've kept mine at factory spec for 258000 miles with no issues. With fuel at 5 a gallon now, I'm working on adjusting for better economy instead of power. (I'm adding the usual 3 guages to baseline it)
 

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gatekeeper you live in mexico?
 

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Or you can just leave it be. I've kept mine at factory spec for 258000 miles with no issues. With fuel at 5 a gallon now, I'm working on adjusting for better economy instead of power. (I'm adding the usual 3 guages to baseline it)
If you just leave it be you might be allright. Once you start turning screws in, indexing, grinding, or replacing fuel pins, and swapping out springy things, well, it's all over. Puts a smile on your face when you mash the go pedal. Turning things back down takes it away. I'm still smilin:thumbsup
(till I stop to fill up:CRY: but hey, it's worth it just for the fun factor)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have been looking at the Autometer gauges pyro and boost. What is the third gauge?

How's this for the sig?
 

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A boost and pryo will get you by. If you had an auto trans most of the guy's like to put a trans temp gage on it.

Do you tow??? If you do that will have a bearing on what you can do to the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have a utility trailor for various uses including towing my Ramcharger to the trails (future project), a camper (old and heavy) and a 22' boat (old and heavy also). One thing is I use my truck for a truck, it is not uncommon to go pick up a load of crushed brick for the driveway or materials for jobs. I am in constrution and do alot of side work so my truck is not just a driveway ornimate.
 

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Mine is just for show, and I would never think of making it have to work:lol3:

 

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Jer1,
How did that banks inlet work out for you? Everything ok with it?

Stan
 

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Jer1,
How did that banks inlet work out for you? Everything ok with it?

Stan
Works great. I really couldn't say what it did by itself as I installed it along with a bunch of other things at the same time, but all in all I'm happy. Thanks again Stan.
:thumbsup:peelout
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Any recomendations for the air box/filter? I have heard to stay away from K&N filters. Was thinking of an open box.
 
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