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A little premature to make that leap. Those are both German automakers. Germany, and to a large extent Europe in general, are far more spring loaded toward electric than the US.

Germany has other political things going on too which are driving this.

I don’t think we are there yet on this side of the Atlantic.
 

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Electrek is a website that pushes the electric car. They've been posting things like this for awhile...

With the hazards and pollution of lithium battery production, I don't really think battery powered electrics are the future. We need something like hydrogen.
 

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Electric is not perfect but it’s definitely the next power source for cars in the foreseeable future. Accounting for battery pollution and energy production, the epa has charts out there to show that electric cars like Tesla get an equivalent 90-100 mpg.

Hydrogen is cool but it is not nearly as efficient as electric motor as there is a lot of energy loss in the process.

Infrastructure will change to accommodate ev and battery charge times will decrease making it more and more viable. I really like the ic but I agree their days are numbered when it comes to cars and trucks.
 

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Electrek is a website that pushes the electric car. They've been posting things like this for awhile...

With the hazards and pollution of lithium battery production, I don't really think battery powered electrics are the future. We need something like hydrogen.
The website is irrelevant, I was just posting it because the news is that Daimler Chrysler will no longer be developing IC engines. That's a pretty big step, in my opinion.
 

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pretty cool when your electricity is produced by a coal burning power plant.
so therefore, you have a coal burning tesla :)
 

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One of these days the proponents of electric cars will have to realize that not everybody lives in a city. And that even those who do leave it on occasion.

It would be a massive undertaking to create the necessary infrastructure (not that it doesn't need an upgrade as it is) before electric cars would be even remotely feasible in large parts of the country.

And then there's that little problem with where the power is coming from in the first place.
 

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One of these days the proponents of electric cars will have to realize that not everybody lives in a city. And that even those who do leave it on occasion.

It would be a massive undertaking to create the necessary infrastructure (not that it doesn't need an upgrade as it is) before electric cars would be even remotely feasible in large parts of the country.

And then there's that little problem with where the power is coming from in the first place.
That's why I say Lithium battery EVs are not the future. Great for cities, bad for everyone else outside the city. We can still use electrical motors, but we need an alternate "fuel" to power them.
 

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I think the automotive industry as a whole will move toward electric vehicles that use a common battery type and the installation of that battery will be such that it allows for quick change capabilities so that rather than having to plug in for hours to recharge one would simply drive into a refit station where the entire battery could be changed out by a robot in less time than it takes to refuel today. Batteries would be cleaned, tested and recharged robotically as well, then put in stock for reuse. Batteries that test bad would be returned to a recycling/rebuilding center to be remanufactured. This whole scenario is already in use on a trial basis in China!
 

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Friends of mine are coming to visit from SoCal soon. They could technically use an electric car there.

Let's say they had one. How long would it take them to traverse the 1,000 miles to the east, mostly along the relatively desolate I-40, then through far more desolate parts away, from the interstate?

In comparison, I've done that stretch in 12 hours (wasn't towing) with two fuel stops. If my friend didn't have his wife with him, he'd probably get here in 14 or so.

I don't know how long it would take with an electric car, but probably several days. And that would be with careful planning.
 

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...so that rather than having to plug in for hours to recharge one would simply drive into a refit station where the entire battery could be changed out by a robot in less time than it takes to refuel today.
That could work...if we had more of those refit stations than we have gas stations now.
Or if the range those batteries could provide would be as good or better than what current vehicles can achieve.
 

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Daimler doesn't say they're no longer developing IC engines. They say they're not developing fundamentally new engine families. The life cycle of the existing designs will support incremental improvements for decades to come. As noted, there's only so much we can do with the basic mechanicals. I imagine tweaks to combustion chamber, valve, and cam design will continue furiously for just as long, to support.....

Development of ever-more-efficient intake, induction, exhaust, and ignition control systems is still going strong everywhere. That's what my employer does. There's no indication that marine, heavy truck, OTR, off-highway, or equipment engines will vanish. Development continues furiously -- always aimed at improving efficiency, specific power, and emissions control. No doubt the development of better engine management systems for smaller engines will continue as well.

Remember that the single greatest reason fuel-burning engines make poisons and other non-optimum by-products is the process regime transitions as RPMs change. Support for a range of RPMs is nothing but compromise. Once the need to run at anything other than a single, optimally efficient speed is gone, it's possible to do things with fine-tuning an engine that are totally impossible when the engine is connected to the wheels, no matter how many gears there are. What do you do with that single RPM, super-efficient engine?

You hook it up to a super-efficient generator that also wants to run at the one single speed and you make electricity.

I believe fuel-burning engines will exist as the alternate -- and long range -- recharging system components of hybrids until such time as a system for storing energy at substantially higher -- read, orders of magnitude higher -- densities is found. And that, unfortunately, is still science fiction.

JMHO
 

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Figuring an average speed of 60mph thats 720 miles. If we use an average range of 400 miles per charge that gets them to your place with only 1 stop! Make the range 200 miles per charge and its 3 stops. Not that bad, really. What kills it is the recharging time. At 2 hours per recharge (I'm guessing, I really don't know how long it takes), well, you can do the math.
 

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One of these days the proponents of electric cars will have to realize that not everybody lives in a city. And that even those who do leave it on occasion.

It would be a massive undertaking to create the necessary infrastructure (not that it doesn't need an upgrade as it is) before electric cars would be even remotely feasible in large parts of the country.

And then there's that little problem with where the power is coming from in the first place.
I understand what you are saying and I agree the ev still has issues. One of the biggest r mileage and charge times. As for being in remote areas of the country, so long as you have access to gas stations in the near future you will have accesss to charge stations. Adding charge stations to any gas station is fairly easy and you will increasingly see them pop up.
 

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I’ve done a road trip in my father's Model X 75D. 1100 miles. 9-10 stops. Avg. 1hr 20min charging. This is from Naples to Houston, so I75 and I10. It takes forever, and the only thing that makes it worthwhile is autopilot.

I’ll take my truck and bed tank any day. 1300 mile range ftw.
 

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Looking back at Chrsyler/FCA's history of great business decisions and how they have played out......the internal combustion engine people are probably sleeping a little better these days knowing this.......:wink2:

Sam
 

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internal combustion engines have not changed since their inception. Pistons go up and down valves open and close.
The have added computers, redesigned fuel systems but the basic engine is the same.
 

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Figuring an average speed of 60mph thats 720 miles. If we use an average range of 400 miles per charge that gets them to your place with only 1 stop! Make the range 200 miles per charge and its 3 stops. Not that bad, really. What kills it is the recharging time. At 2 hours per recharge (I'm guessing, I really don't know how long it takes), well, you can do the math.
I think you misunderstood my post. It's very close to 1,000 miles, and getting there in 12 hours requires much more than a 60 mph average.

With a 200 mile range that'd be five stops, or three with a 400 mile range. But the real issue is that there must be somewhere to perform that charge.
Just like with gas stations, there isn't always one when and where you need it.
 

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One of these days the proponents of electric cars will have to realize that not everybody lives in a city. And that even those who do leave it on occasion.

It would be a massive undertaking to create the necessary infrastructure (not that it doesn't need an upgrade as it is) before electric cars would be even remotely feasible in large parts of the country.

And then there's that little problem with where the power is coming from in the first place.
No, they won't. But the market will. Our way of life simply can't exist without mobility.

I really, really believe we'll see a shift in the underlying structure of our vehicle mix. I believe urban areas will see more and more pure electrics, where it makes sense, and everyone else will shift to more and more efficient hybrids. The beauty of a hybrid is that it can work just like an EV for very short runs, with the engine only running when it's needed. This is what makes plug-in hybrids so attractive: as social engineering drives the cost of fuel up, those plug-in hybrid drivers will be strongly incentivized to pump joules instead of gallons. The politics will be complex. I wouldn't be surprised to see the cost of fuel move towards vastly different price points, in and near urban centers vs. out in the middle of the country on I-10 or 40.

Interesting times, in a Chinese curse kind of way.....

JMHO
 

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internal combustion engines have not changed since their inception. Pistons go up and down valves open and close.
The have added computers, redesigned fuel systems but the basic engine is the same.
Ah, but tweaks to the basic mechanicals along with the computers -- and associated actuators and processes -- have increased specific power by two to three orders of magnitude, decreased undesirable emissions by four to five orders of magnitude, and can enhance efficiency by one or two orders of magnitude! The basic concept is the same, but every blessed detail, material, and feature is a product of technology a hundred and fifty years in the making!

Just imagine how long it might take to explain everything about a modern engine to Nikolaus Otto....
 
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