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Discussion Starter #1
Read the lengthy discussion about unplugging your egr, did it. Also cleaned my filthy azz Map sensor. My question, for lack of knowledge about my engine, how does the Map/Egr work together? If the Egr is unplugged, how does the Map work then? I did read and haven't found any related info yet, apparently there is no issues or no one has reported them.
 

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Read the lengthy discussion about unplugging your egr, did it. Also cleaned my filthy azz Map sensor. My question, for lack of knowledge about my engine, how does the Map/Egr work together? If the Egr is unplugged, how does the Map work then? I did read and haven't found any related info yet, apparently there is no issues or no one has reported them.
Well if you unplugged your EGR and cleaned your map sensor you should have noticed that they are on differerent connectors. MAP = Maniflold Pressure and EGR = exhaust gas recirculator (BAD). They do not work together....
 

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Map sensors measure pressure, more specifically boost pressure, so the ecm knows how much fuel it needs to match the boost. And yes they are not connected, the map sensor can do its job just fine without the EGR.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yup, figured that out right after posting. Learning curve is a little steep for me. :banghead:
 

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Yup, figured that out right after posting. Learning curve is a little steep for me. :banghead:
Welcome to the forum. I have probably spent more time on here learning/reading than I have with my significant other in the past two years. Get out, GET OUT NOW before it's too late!

But really, enjoy your education here. It's a great place with tons of info.

Now, not to highjack your thread I'll say this:

MAP sensor is "Manifold Absolute Pressure" sensor. So basically boost plus atmospheric pressure hence "Absolute" part of it. Why's this important? Because as you increase elevation, you decrease the pressue of the atomosphere and hence the amount of air that enters the engine. Like someone else said, the MAP allows the ECM to know how much fuel to add to the engine on the combustion cycle.

EGR. This is "Exhaust Gas Return" which returns exhaust back to the intake for reduced NOx (nitrogen oxides) for the tree huggers. This is bad because now you're introducing soot from the exhaust back into the intake of the engine. Last time I checked, I've got an air filter that is supposed to clean the air entering my engine, WhyTF would I want to introduce soot into the intake? So disconnect that crap and get rid of it, the old 5.9 Cummins doesn't have EGR, my new one doesn't need it either!

Now adding to this crappola is the CCV (Closed Crankcase Vent) which returns crankcase breathing to the inlet of the turbo. This again is due to tree hugger nazis. What this effectively does is coat your entire intake system with a thin coat of oil reducing the intercooler effectiveness. Unplug the CCV from the turbo inlet, plug the hose (I used a screw driver handle cut off) and vent the crankcase to atmosphere. My old 5.9 breaths easy to the atmosphere, now my new 6.7 does!

All these things are usually refered to as BOMBs (Better Off Modified Baby!) and improve upon stock designed short comings.

Again, welcome to the forum, read, read and read. Use the search function and ask questions where/when needed. This is a large community of people who take pride in their trucks and will not usually steer you wrong. There's tons of experience wrenching these trucks and we all want them to last longer and perform better.

Enjoy your stay!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info. Wasn't aware of the CCV issue, gonna look into that a little more.
 
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