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LOL...it IS a process!!!

CLD= constrained layer damper in tiles or sheets, especially designed to reduce the resonance of flat panels.\ so that they don't vibrate/make noise when you play your stereo loud or as they vibrate driving down the road.

CCF = closed cell foam (as opposed to open cell foam) that prevents the damped panels from vibrating against the MLV

MLV = Mass Loaded Vinyl is a dense and heavy material especially designed to block noise

For the most effective panel deadening and sound insulation, you DO want to build a THREE layer "sandwich" of CLD tiles stuck directly to the trucks body panels at 30% coverage; Use either the Resonox or KK Lolossus CLD as they are the best you can buy.

THEN add a layer of CCF (closed cell foam like ensolite or even a yoga mat you can buy at Walmart, or from Resonix) and THEN over the CCF, add a layer of MLV (mass loaded vinyl) that likely will be cheapest and best to buy from Trademark Sound Solutions.

BOTH the CCF and MLV should cover as MUCH of the interior of the truck as possible in order to block out unwanted engine and road noise.

The MLV is most easily hung using HIGH STRENGTH velcro tape also available from Resonix...his tape is even stronger and more heat resistant then most other velcro tapes that are also advertised as high strength. If you want to make your life easier, get some of this tape from Resonix.
 

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LOL...it IS a process!!!

CLD= constrained layer damper in tiles or sheets, especially designed to reduce the resonance of flat panels.\ so that they don't vibrate/make noise when you play your stereo loud or as they vibrate driving down the road.

CCF = closed cell foam (as opposed to open cell foam) that prevents the damped panels from vibrating against the MLV

MLV = Mass Loaded Vinyl is a dense and heavy material especially designed to block noise

For the most effective panel deadening and sound insulation, you DO want to build a THREE layer "sandwich" of CLD tiles stuck directly to the trucks body panels at 30% coverage; Use either the Resonox or KK Lolossus CLD as they are the best you can buy.

THEN add a layer of CCF (closed cell foam like ensolite or even a yoga mat you can buy at Walmart, or from Resonix) and THEN over the CCF, add a layer of MLV (mass loaded vinyl) that likely will be cheapest and best to buy from Trademark Sound Solutions.

BOTH the CCF and MLV should cover as MUCH of the interior of the truck as possible in order to block out unwanted engine and road noise.

The MLV is most easily hung using HIGH STRENGTH velcro tape also available from Resonix...his tape is even stronger and more heat resistant then most other velcro tapes that are also advertised as high strength. If you want to make your life easier, get some of this tape from Resonix.
Hell yea! Thats exactly what i was looking for. So really the CCF is just a barrier between the already damped panels and the MLV. Does the velcro he sells adhere to the CCF? I know its good stuff, but that sounds weird. I would imagine you would want to put the velcro on the CCF and then use some sort of glue on the CCF to the MLV since both are 100% coverage anyway.

Last question, did the guys on the forum do any testing on the Trademark Soun Solutions stuff? I know all the MLVs are not what they always advertise. Wondering if that stuff is better than any other.
 

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Yes Don recommended using a special vinyl adhesive glue to bond the MLV and CCF or you can use PSA CCF.


There is really nothing to t"test" about MLV, as the ONLY important thing is that it is made from virgin vinyl so that it doesn't make your car smell like recycled plastic while you are driving around. The TSS MLV is US made from virgin vinyl AND they offer free shipping on rolls.

The important part about CCF is that it doesn't smell get hard and brittle over age like some cheaper ones do. Resonix sells a nice CCF and it shouldn't be too expensive to ship since it is so lightweight. You can also get PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive) backed CCF to make it easier to install to either the MLV or over the CLD. The said, you really do NOT want to use PSA backed CCF in places wthat you might NEED to access later (like your door) just in case something breaks (like your window mechanism or door lock). The velcro makes removing the CCF and MLV "curtain" easier and ir DOES stick to anything!!!

The important part about the CLD is that:

1) it effectively lowers panel resonance
2) the butyl rubber sticky part can deal with the high inside temperatures of a vehicle when parked in the sun...some of the more common brands will eventually slide off to the bottom of your door and leave skid marks the whole way, particularly if you live in TX or some other extremely how evironment.


EDIT --

heres a link to Dons how to on CCF/MLV

 

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LOL...it IS a process!!!

CLD= constrained layer damper in tiles or sheets, especially designed to reduce the resonance of flat panels.\ so that they don't vibrate/make noise when you play your stereo loud or as they vibrate driving down the road.

CCF = closed cell foam (as opposed to open cell foam) that prevents the damped panels from vibrating against the MLV

MLV = Mass Loaded Vinyl is a dense and heavy material especially designed to block noise

For the most effective panel deadening and sound insulation, you DO want to build a THREE layer "sandwich" of CLD tiles stuck directly to the trucks body panels at 30% coverage; Use either the Resonox or KK Lolossus CLD as they are the best you can buy.

THEN add a layer of CCF (closed cell foam like ensolite or even a yoga mat you can buy at Walmart, or from Resonix) and THEN over the CCF, add a layer of MLV (mass loaded vinyl) that likely will be cheapest and best to buy from Trademark Sound Solutions.

BOTH the CCF and MLV should cover as MUCH of the interior of the truck as possible in order to block out unwanted engine and road noise.

The MLV is most easily hung using HIGH STRENGTH velcro tape also available from Resonix...his tape is even stronger and more heat resistant then most other velcro tapes that are also advertised as high strength. If you want to make your life easier, get some of this tape from Resonix.
That or put a stock muffler back on. My friend chucked his Magnaflow and re-installed the factory one. It's so nice inside now.
 

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That or put a stock muffler back on. My friend chucked his Magnaflow and re-installed the factory one. It's so nice inside now.
I still do have the stock muffler on my truck and, like you say, it works great at reducing engine noise.

That said, I also added the sounded deadening sandwich that I am talking about and it still even more substantially reduced engine,tranny, tire and road noise more !!!

Just sayin'....LOL.
 

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I still do have the stock muffler on my truck and, like you say, it works great at reducing engine noise.

That said, I also added the sounded deadening sandwich that I am talking about and it still even more substantially reduced engine,tranny, tire and road noise more !!!

Just sayin'....LOL.
Yeah,for sure. I sure could have used some on my 24v. My wife and I had to raise our voices without being angry at each other in order to communicate in that truck. When I first got the '07 she said she couldn't hear me coming. I have a Shuttleworth HD diesel muffler from your parts which is relatively quiet compared to many out there but I'm about ready to spring for a stocker. They're expensive but's about time.
 

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That or put a stock muffler back on. My friend chucked his Magnaflow and re-installed the factory one. It's so nice inside now.
Oddly enough, I’m not trying to get rid of the noise because it bothers me! Call me crazy, but I actually like the engine noise and the sound of my 5” straight pipe. My goal is to actually just quiet down the outside noise in general to increase the effectiveness of the the sound system I am going to throw in. It is also cool just to sit inside a car that is sound proofed well and you are sitting in a black hole of silence. Like Don says on his website, it’s pretty neat when it’s raining outside and you can’t even hear the rain hitting the roof.
 

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This thread inspired me to soundproof my whole truck while I’m still working from home. I did Noico CLD in my doors a while back and it made a noticeable difference. Waiting on my MLV to arrive to finish those out.

I put the Noico tiles on the ceiling and then filled with some sound deadening mats off amazon. They’re cotton and appear to be pretty quality. I also bought some of the “hydrophobic melamine foam” off amazon. It’s complete garage and I’m sending that back and using the cotton.

I will say after pulling the whole interior and carpet, that I don’t expect much benefit from the MLV and Ccf on the front 2/3rds of the cab floor. The carpet is really thick and has a really thick dense foam under the front 1/3. The foot wells also have a thinner version of what looks like the same material under the carpet. The back 1/3 of the cab and the back wall I think are going to make a dramatic difference though. Thin carpet padding type material under the back seat and the back wall resonates like a snare drum. Here are a few pics I’ve got so far:







Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This thread inspired me to soundproof my whole truck while I’m still working from home. I did Noico CLD in my doors a while back and it made a noticeable difference. Waiting on my MLV to arrive to finish those out.

I put the Noico tiles on the ceiling and then filled with some sound deadening mats off amazon. They’re cotton and appear to be pretty quality. I also bought some of the “hydrophobic melamine foam” off amazon. It’s complete garage and I’m sending that back and using the cotton.

I will say after pulling the whole interior and carpet, that I don’t expect much benefit from the MLV and Ccf on the front 2/3rds of the cab floor. The carpet is really thick and has a really thick dense foam under the front 1/3. The foot wells also have a thinner version of what looks like the same material under the carpet. The back 1/3 of the cab and the back wall I think are going to make a dramatic difference though. Thin carpet padding type material under the back seat and the back wall resonates like a snare drum. Here are a few pics I’ve got so far:







Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
dude keep us posted on this! Cant wait to hear how it turns out. I will be giving the truck the same treatment in about a month
 

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Finished the sound insulation. Only ended up doing MLV on the front passenger door because it was such a pain in the a$$ to get the panel back on it took me hours i didn’t have it in me to do all the other doors. Maybe there’s an easier way but there are so many clips on the panels and so little room in places I had to remove so much material I think it probably dead water the purpose.

I did use sound absorbers in all the door panels though as they’re easy to stick inside. My wife was VERY impressed with how quiet it is. I could tell a big difference myself. I think the back passenger seat floor, the back wall and the ceiling are the places to see the most gains. The doors are very easy to add CLD material to. Not sure it’s worth tearing the rest of the interior out but who knows I’m no scientist nor did I do any solid before and after testing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Finished the sound insulation. Only ended up doing MLV on the front passenger door because it was such a pain in the a$$ to get the panel back on it took me hours i didn’t have it in me to do all the other doors. Maybe there’s an easier way but there are so many clips on the panels and so little room in places I had to remove so much material I think it probably dead water the purpose.

I did use sound absorbers in all the door panels though as they’re easy to stick inside. My wife was VERY impressed with how quiet it is. I could tell a big difference myself. I think the back passenger seat floor, the back wall and the ceiling are the places to see the most gains. The doors are very easy to add CLD material to. Not sure it’s worth tearing the rest of the interior out but who knows I’m no scientist nor did I do any solid before and after testing.


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Which material did you use a the sound absorber?


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So if I got a half kit of Don's stuff its worth its weight in gold? LOL Well I guess I'll have to mix and match when I do my carpet.
 

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honestly don't know if I'd bother under the carpet. It's really thick. The back seat platform and back wall can be done much easier and i think had the most impact. That and the headliner.

I just went camping this weekend after the sound deadening and 17in FTE install. Pretty much all I hear is tire noise unless im going up a grade.
 
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