Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Per the operators manual for my 06 DRW, 2 drops of oil are applied onto the 2 piece lug nuts. No oil type is specified. Any suggestions on what to use?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
408 Posts
I use a Little antisize compound, been doing this as long as I’ve been driving with no issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
I personally would avoid anti sieze of any type, the mess alone is enough of a reason. For those of us living in environments with treated roads, it will actually lead to faster corrosion.

In this case, we're also not talking about the threads but the space between the captive washer in the wheel lug nut and the nut itself. Pretty hard to get anti sieze in there.

When the FSM says "oil" it means the type you'd put in the engine unless otherwise specified. They mention when to use GC-LB grease, when to use axle gear oil, when to use automatic transmission fluid... oil is just engine oil :thumbsup: I personally use whatever is in my oil squirt can, which at the moment is cheapest parts store 5W-30 API-SN oil. Maye I should hit them with brake clean and put 15W-40 CI+? LOL!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jimmy N.

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,145 Posts
FWIW, antiseize will NOT lead to faster corrosion than bare metal. (Although there may be something better than antiseize??)
I grew up in the rust belt and have spent most other years in areas with harsh winters and road salt, etc. A little grease or antiseize makes a world of difference.
Example, when the truck in my sig was almost new, I removed all the brake caliper bolts while rotating tires and anti seized them. Several years later fronts came off easily when I needed to replace the pads. Just 2 years ago I replaced the rears, as the brake pad spacers had rusted away and caused the pads to wear out prematurely. Almost 10 years after adding the antiseize, the rear brake caliper bolts came out just like it had just come off the assembly line.
Same with lug nuts. A couple/3 winters in snow country and they'll be rusted on if left bare.

And to those who say you shouldn't lube wheel lugs because they could come loose.....if you're depending on rust to keep your lug nuts on, you have bigger problems!
 
  • Like
Reactions: imaybail

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
FWIW, antiseize will NOT lead to faster corrosion than bare metal. (Although there may be something better than antiseize??)
I grew up in the rust belt and have spent most other years in areas with harsh winters and road salt, etc. A little grease or antiseize makes a world of difference.
Example, when the truck in my sig was almost new, I removed all the brake caliper bolts while rotating tires and anti seized them. Several years later fronts came off easily when I needed to replace the pads. Just 2 years ago I replaced the rears, as the brake pad spacers had rusted away and caused the pads to wear out prematurely. Almost 10 years after adding the antiseize, the rear brake caliper bolts came out just like it had just come off the assembly line.
Same with lug nuts. A couple/3 winters in snow country and they'll be rusted on if left bare.
While your experiences are valid, anti seize will accelerate galvanic corrosion. Unless of course you're slapping on high Nickel content based stuff. I used to love slobbing anti seize on everything. In fact I loved it so much that when I bought my new Yukon spin free hubs, I thought "I'll never go through the hell of taking unit bearings off again! Some anti seize here, some anti seize there, I'll be laughing when I pull these apart again!". Oh, I was laughing alright...



Laughing and crying as I had to use heat, 4 lb club hammers, giant chisels and all kinds of other stuff to take out the spindles. Just look at all the iron from the steering knuckles that transferred to the steel spindles. They were installed in a July and removed the following May to do ball joints. That's right, one winter with liquid chlorine salt on the roads and some anti seize between the parts and look at what it did.

This is what lead me to stop using it everywhere and research what I was putting on. Anti seize is great for using forcing screw presses, or when pressing things together to prevent galling and seizing. I think it's absolutely terrible to use in automotive applications.

Personally I've switched to using a little bit of motor oil on things like lug nuts and door hinges, or silicone grease with PTFE everywhere else oil is not convenient.

Brake caliper bolts and small (less than M14) fasteners require so little torque to hold in that even if you used anti seize they'd probably come out just fine with an impact gun. I go with factory recommendation on that one, medium strength thread locker. Blue LocTite and other anaerobic sealants are great at preventing corrosion as well :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,795 Posts
I ditched anti-seize years ago. Like most, I thought it was the end all to keeping things from locking together. Eventually the stuff gets hard and like others' experiences, I had things lock together even when using it. As well, it makes a mess, and can just compound on bolts.

I was turned onto this stuff which is why I ditched anti-seize:

I've used it in saltwater boat applications and literally bolts will come out like butter years down the road. I've been using it on bolts, interfaces, etc ever since and never had a problem getting things apart.

I'll still use copper anti-seize in high heat applications or the true nickel based stuff, but you pay premium for that and I really only use it in specific applications
 

·
Fastest Welder in Texas
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
I always use "Never sieze"... It's an industrial grade of anti sieze. It's a dark black/grey color, and is Nickle based.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Broaner

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
been using boat trailer wheel bearing grease for 40 years on everything down there,lug nuts bearings,ujoints tierods nothing will ever corrode
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,145 Posts
Grogg, I won't copy the pic you posted, too painful to see twice! lol
But holy shart, one winter AND you coated the mating surface between the hub and spindle? Not doubting you but I haven't seen that bad before. Even when I kept up a fleet of plow trucks in IL. Couple of them even tossed out their own rust accelerator out the back (salt trucks)!
So what's a guy use to keep that from happening that fast? Honest question. (Besides a moving van to somewhere south of the Mason Dixon line!)

On another note, what required the new free spin hubs to need removed within a year? Thought that was the point, never have to remove them again, just replace bearings..
 

·
Fastest Welder in Texas
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Industrial "Never-seize" ftw.

If you are serious about using an anti corrosion lubricant on your drivetrain, this is it. And only it. IMO.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Broaner

·
Fastest Welder in Texas
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
This is the ONLY compound used in refineries and chemical plants... And for good reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,795 Posts
Industrial "Never-seize" ftw.

If you are serious about using an anti corrosion lubricant on your drivetrain, this is it. And only it. IMO.
$77 for a 1 lb can of that damn...
Guess if you wanna fork out for that type of stuff, any type of nickle based anti-seize is good but they are all pricey.
That's why I ended up going to the Evinrude marine grease. Has worked on our boats that see Alaskan saltwater since the 80's (old man's engine is from teh early 80's).
Bolts and interfaces still come apart like the day it was applied.
 

·
Fastest Welder in Texas
Joined
·
3,604 Posts
Well, what's a few bucks more for that absolute best... Especially when it's lasts for so long.
You buy one can, and there will be some left in that can when you are no longer of this Earth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Grogg, I won't copy the pic you posted, too painful to see twice! lol
But holy shart, one winter AND you coated the mating surface between the hub and spindle? Not doubting you but I haven't seen that bad before. Even when I kept up a fleet of plow trucks in IL. Couple of them even tossed out their own rust accelerator out the back (salt trucks)!
So what's a guy use to keep that from happening that fast? Honest question. (Besides a moving van to somewhere south of the Mason Dixon line!)

On another note, what required the new free spin hubs to need removed within a year? Thought that was the point, never have to remove them again, just replace bearings..
Hahaha... moving van to south of the Mason Dixon. :)

I use silicone grease with PTFE! I like this particular kind.

As for why I had to take the spindles out again, I did the free spin kit but did not do ball joints because they were tight at the time. It was a particularly bad winter for pot holes and by the time spring rolled around they were toast. Perhaps bad planning on my part, who knows, I paid for it either way :D

Industrial "Never-seize" ftw.

If you are serious about using an anti corrosion lubricant on your drivetrain, this is it. And only it. IMO.
That's the aforementioned high nickel content stuff I was referring to :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Per the operators manual for my 06 DRW, 2 drops of oil are applied onto the 2 piece lug nuts. No oil type is specified. Any suggestions on what to use?
Back to the real question at hand, the oil for the 2 piece lug nuts, I just use a couple of drops of 3-in-1. I think the only reason for the oil is so that the washer part of the lug nut is less likely to spin against the wheel surface as you torque them thereby preserving the paint on your wheels. Maybe also to preserve the surface where the nut part meets the washer part. But, since the manual doesn't specify, I don't think it really matters.

I would avoid using motor oil for this purpose as it typically has a lot of other stuff in it that your wheel nuts don't need, like viscosity modifiers, detergents, acid neutralizers, etc. I read somewhere that motor oil only needs to be 50% actual oil...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Back to the real question at hand, the oil for the 2 piece lug nuts, I just use a couple of drops of 3-in-1. I think the only reason for the oil is so that the washer part of the lug nut is less likely to spin against the wheel surface as you torque them thereby preserving the paint on your wheels.
Unlikely.


Maybe also to preserve the surface where the nut part meets the washer part.
Very likely.

I would avoid using motor oil for this purpose as it typically has a lot of other stuff in it that your wheel nuts don't need, like viscosity modifiers, detergents, acid neutralizers, etc.
Would you mind elaborating on how any of those items would negatively affect the use for their intended purpose? If these common motor oil additives are not beneficial, but will not cause harm, why avoid it? Motor oil is probably the most common thing lying around for such a purpose. When the FSM for 3rd gen Dodges was written, we were way past the era of non detergent motor oil. The FSM is not specific about the oil to use in this application, it just says "oil". The FSM writers are not infallible, but they were wise enough to make specifications like ATF+4 and MS-6897 where it matters to them. They then summarily indicate their use in specific cases. It seems most likely they would have indicated (and spec'd) specific non detergent oil for that use. If you have anything to suggest that harm might be done, I'd love to hear about it. I'm willing to bust out the 3-in-1 or pick up SAE 30 non detergent if there's a reasonable doubt about my current practise :thumbsup:

I read somewhere that motor oil only needs to be 50% actual oil...
Link? I'd love to read such an article.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Link? I'd love to read such an article.
I'll try to find the article again.

As to the motor oil thing, I agree with you in that I don't think the viscosity modifiers, acid neutralizers, detergents, etc., are harmful in any way to things like wheel nuts or anything else you want to lubricate, even though those things are in fact necessary for our internal combustion engines for a number of reasons, like maintaining viscosity, neutralizing acids, suspending soot and so on. My only concern is that if you really want to put "oil" on something like a lug nut that "only" needs to be lubricated, there is no sense putting on oil diluted with things like viscosity modifiers, acid neutralizers, detergents, etc., which serve no purpose for wheel nuts, since wheel nuts do not need to maintain oil viscosity and oil pressure over a wide range of temperatures, do not generate soot that needs to be suspended and kept from blocking up oil passages, nor do they do anything that tends to turn the oil acidic, and so forth. Only a certain amount of the fluid you put on the wheel nuts will stick, which is why I'd just as soon it be pure oil.

But that's just me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Grogg

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,380 Posts
Any motor , gear oil or grease that does not evapaorate is fine.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top