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What will the 2023 MY bring us?

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Rear Admiral Rickard Onmi
2018 Ram 3500 CCLBSRW
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"During its EV Day 2021 presentation, Stellantis said that the future of the Ram Heavy Duty lineup will be electrified. Koval seems to have confirmed that, in his interview with Motor Authority. However, don’t expect it to happen anytime soon. The current fourth-generation Ram Heavy Duty will receive several new updates for 2023, allowing the truck to at least continue production in its current state till 2028.

Koval explained that the possibility of an electrified Heavy Duty pickup could take place in the 2030s, however, he expects that timeline to be pulled forward dramatically.

Another interesting point, dropped by Stellantis during the EV Day 2021 presentation was the possible use of hydrogen fuel cells for the Heavy Duty pickup segment. Koval seemed to confirm that as he told Motor Authority he believes hydrogen fuel cells could be an interesting solution for both Heavy Duty pickup and Chassis Cab customers. He stated that RAM is looking at the possibilities, however, nothing has been decided on as of yet."

Cummins may power Ram’s hydrogen future – Stellpower
I'm not sure hydrogen will be able to take off to be able to do the job. for a number of reasons, #1 the infrastructure is not there. It will need to be built up from the ground up, and there is already more EV charging locations then hydrogen locations. While it could be argued that hydrogen could be an easier transition, its still in IC engine. When many states are banning sales of new IC engine vehicles, starting in the 2030s. Being a Washington state resident, i expect my last diesel vehicle to be purchased in 2028 or 2029. Once purchased it won't be sold until availability of fuel is to the point where it's impractical. So maybe the 2040s? If someone wanted to do something radical, look at the trains. Put in a small diesel generator, and a power pack. Give the batteries enough charge for 100 miles, and a generator capable of keeping up to add another 4-600 miles of range off a tank of fuel. All of the technology currently exists to do this. The generator can run at a constant speed for peak efficiency and economy meaning a smaller engine, smaller fuel tank, and better range with less emissions. Instant torque of electric motors can be a game changer, if someone just wants to put forth the effort to make a true hybrid and to try and simplify things, rather then complicate things.
 

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Hydrogen is a waste of energy. How do you make hydrogen? By splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen, which takes electricity. Not a commercially viable option. It's a neat technology, but not efficient.

Give us a real transmission. I'm on my 7th Dodge/Ram Cummins. While my 2022 Aisin is WAY better than my 2017 was, I still think my 2022 68RFE drove far better unloaded or loaded.

Come on Ram, give us a real ZF 8 speed. It's awesome in my wife's Grand Wagoner, awesome in my diesel Rubicon, awesome in the Charger/Challengers regardless of engine choice.

My buddy's 2022 F350 transmission is so much better. The 2022 Silverado HD transmission I test drove is so much better.

Really the only thing I am displeased with in all of my Ram/Dodge trucks over the years is the transmission (aside from my NV5600).

Come on Ram, give us a new tranny in addition to better tow mirrors and a digital dash...
 
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Hydrogen is a waste of energy.
You might think Hydrogen is a waste of money, but it's one method for companies to reach carbon neutrality by 2035. There's already a partnership between Love's, Cummins, and Trillium to put in the infrastructure.

 

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"Today, Cummins Inc. (NYSE: CMI) debuted its 15-liter hydrogen engine at ACT Expo in Long Beach, California. This engine is built on Cummins’ new fuel-agnostic platform, where below the head gasket each fuel type’s engine has largely similar components, and above the head gasket, each has different components for different fuel types. This version, with expected full production in 2027, pairs with clean, zero-carbon hydrogen fuel, a key enabler of Cummins’ strategy to go further faster to help customers reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

“We’ve established significant goals as part of our PLANET 2050 sustainability strategy, including a target of zero emissions,” said Srikanth Padmanabhan, President, Engine Business, Cummins Inc. “Reducing well-to-wheels carbon emissions requires innovation of both energy sources and power solutions. While use cases for battery electric and fuel cell electric powertrains are promising, the pairing of green hydrogen in the proven technology of internal combustion engines provides an important complement to future zero emissions solutions.”

Cummins announced the testing of hydrogen internal combustion (ICE) technology in July 2021, and has made impressive early results, already achieving production power and torque targets (over 810 ft-lbs torque and 290 hp from the medium-duty engine). Additional testing on Cummins’ more advanced prototypes will begin soon. With Cummins’ significant global manufacturing footprint, the company can quickly scale production.

The industry needs multiple solutions to meet the needs of all on- and off-highway customers and all applications considering the variation in duty cycles and operating environments.
The engine will be a zero-carbon fueled solution for multiple markets. Cummins intends to produce hydrogen internal combustion engines in both the 15-liter and 6.7-liter displacements, believing that these engines enable the industry to take action and reduce GHG emissions yet this decade, ultimately accelerating carbon reduction.

“Working with Cummins to navigate the journey to zero emissions means working with an experienced partner that has the right knowledge, tools, and resources to ensure a smooth transition,” said Jim Nebergall, General Manger, Hydrogen Engines at Cummins Inc. “Our customers are responding favorably to this practical technology. These engines look like engines, they sound like engines, and fit where engines normally fit,” he continued.

Hydrogen internal combustion engines use zero-carbon fuel at a lower initial price of a fuel cell or battery electric vehicle with little modification to today's vehicles. Accelerated market adoption of hydrogen engine powered vehicles is driven by the technology’s high technology maturity, low initial cost, extended vehicle range, fast fueling, powertrain installation commonality, and end-user familiarity.

“Heavy-duty trucking is critical to the global economy and is one of the hard-to-abate sectors of the economy,” said Daryl Wilson, Executive Director of the Hydrogen Council. “We are encouraged by progress at Cummins in the development of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and look forward to continued advancements that can help us reach cost-effective decarbonization of economies worldwide.”
 
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