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Do I need to be using power service every time I fill my 2019 ram 6.7? Thanks
No, you don't have too.....but I do about every time....I use Power Service...the reason being I have an auxiliary tank in the bed so I pour it into my 60 gallon tank....maybe not every tank. If I'm running through it on a long trip...I don't use as much....but I definitely do when I don't run her much and it sits in the tank for a couple of weeks.
 
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What does the manual say?

-39C (ambient) this morning, and for most this week, so I do have the white (winter) power service in the tank to be safe.
 
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I understand Cummins recommends it. I have no idea why - they aren't known to have given a reason.

I doubt, as has been said, that it is because they get a kickback. It would be a trivial amount versus something like x brand diesel fuel - or tires - or recommending their own additive. I find a significant MPG increase and engine quieting when I use it in my mildly modified 1998.5 24 valve. I find NO difference when I use it in my 2015. I've tried it, on and off, many times and observed no effect. The high mileage drivers here seem to have tried it, and report no detectable benefit. People from the far north and deep south report no detectable benefit. people from dry and humid climates report no detectable benefits. Heavy haulers to semi-monthly grocery getters report no detectable benefit. I've never heard of a warranty denial for not using it.

If you're not included in one of those groups give it a try and let us know the result. Otherwise join the crowd of happy non-users.
 

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Per a reputable independent diesel only repair service I have had work done and trust, "because the advent of modern diesel fuel is woefully low in critical chemistry ie. lubricity, cetane etc. and is essentially very dry fuel", they recommend adding a diesel fuel additive, whichever brand you choose with each fill-up and no more than every other fill-up. I have seen no reliable evidence to the contrary and have no reason to question them. Considering the cost of these trucks it seems like false economy to save on either not using or minimally adding a diesel additive. So I add it at every fill-up.
 

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Per a reputable independent diesel only repair service I have had work done and trust, "because the advent of modern diesel fuel is woefully low in critical chemistry ie. lubricity, cetane etc. and is essentially very dry fuel", they recommend adding a diesel fuel additive, whichever brand you choose with each fill-up and no more than every other fill-up. I have seen no reliable evidence to the contrary and have no reason to question them. Considering the cost of these trucks it seems like false economy to save on either not using or minimally adding a diesel additive. So I add it at every fill-up.
Because of lackluster “evidence” from “reputable” diesel shops, I use the best.

https://youtu.be/KdzQYEufU68
 

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What does the manual say?

-39C (ambient) this morning, and for most this week, so I do have the white (winter) power service in the tank to be safe.
I can't relate to that kind of cold so do whatever you need to keep fuel flowing. Sounds like a good place for gasoline.
 

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Saw an interesting test done by a Youtuber (Project Farm). He has some interesting testing on a variety of products.

Here is a video of his testing of diesel additives:

I'm not crazy about some of his tests, however the lubricity and gel tests appear valid and "may" translate to real world benefit.
However, without understanding the emissions differences and corrosion for actual fuel system materials I'll remain skeptical.
 

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You have to ask yourself why you are adding it.

If you don't trust your local fuel source to have fuel available to battle cold temps, then yes using PS white bottle is going to help your truck.

If you are adding it because you want to add lubricity to your fuel, then there are better products for this if you believe this test.. (and yes I know it's over a decade old..) https://www.jatonkam35s.com/DeuceTechnicalManuals/Diesel_fuel_additive_test.pdf

Personally, I have been running thousands of gallons of ULSD from the same fuel station, and the same pump, since ULSD was introduced in Alaska. I've had zero issues from any of my trucks, even those not built when ULSD was a thing. Never a drop of additive.
 

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I can't relate to that kind of cold so do whatever you need to keep fuel flowing. Sounds like a good place for gasoline.
Diesel fuel, heating oil, jet fuel all works in these temps.
 

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No modern diesel *needs* any additives, other than perhaps some anti-gel when experiencing extremely cold weather when the fuel stations haven't blended in enough Arctic #1.

In fact, I'd be very wary of using additives now, especially on the CP4 pump equipped trucks. The wrong kind of additive is destructive to the pump. Anti-gel formulas strip lube from the pump pistons - you'll see Power Service products often contain a "Slick 50" lubricity additive as well to help counteract this problem.

Contrary to some of you who think you're doing the truck a favor by dumping in additive at every fill up, I'd say just the opposite to protect your truck...use as little additive as possible.

If I recall, Power Service was NOT recommended for the 6.7L Powerstrokes because of alcohol content which was harmful to the CP4. I realize that my 2018 Cummins owner's manual recommended Power Service products, but that was with the old, more tolerant CP3 pump. I'm not sure if they are still recommending them or not for 2019.

I run Motorcraft anti gel in the extreme cold weather because it was specifically safe for the CP4 pump.

Be very careful of emulsifiers and water absorbers in many of the popular additives. They cause water to be absorbed into the diesel and can no longer be separated or filtered by the truck, allowing water to get into the CP4 pump and cause damage. Diesel 911 is bad too.
 

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troverman,
Could you post a link(s) for the source of the information you mentioned in your post?
Thanks
 

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Most of the info came from the Ford forum, but I did clip this screenshot from the 2017 Super Duty owner's manual I previously owned. It states no additives are needed, and that aftermarket additives can damage the fuel system and it won't be covered under warranty. I think this answers the question for those who use additives at every fill-up.
 

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Too funny. I just got off a Ford forum talking about additives and fuel gelling. I’m sure anyone can find a back and forth discussion to support anything they believe to be true. The gist of the discussion I was reading came down to the fact that these additives, to be safely transported, need to be in the bed of the truck. The Motorcraft antigel was getting hammered because when it came time to add it before you fueled, it was already in a gelled state. For that reason, the Power Service ( White bottle for Winter ) crowd came out in their full support for Diesel Supplement anti gel.

Then there was this guy who swore by his long standing approach, which made sense to me.

Stanadyne contains NO alcohol, and that includes the Ford product and the Deere product I use. I am not familiar with PowerService, but if a product contains alcohol its an emulsifier, not an demulsifier.
Demulsifier products are the preferred method of removing water at the water separator, Emulsifier's blend water with fuel and pass them through the fuel system.

I’ve been using PS Diesel Kleen in the warmer temperatures and just recently switched over to the Diesel Supplement for the colder weather. My truck is only a few months old and your comments and those above have me wondering about my choice of products. But, as you know, Cummins endorses Power Service products but the Owners Manual says no fuel additives are required.

I’m trying to go by the book as far as recommended maintenance is concerned. And if there is anything I can do to make my truck outlive me, I’m all for it. It just seems like on some of this stuff it’s a roll of the dice. What’s a mother to do.
 

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Yes they are, even on the CP4 pumps.The "recommended" goes right along with "suggested" & "endorsed". Nothing more than a cash grab for a sub standard product, not unlike Valvoline "Premium" Blue.

I'll pay attention when they say "required". Not that Cummins warranty means a hoot to a Dodge owner.


If I recall, Power Service was NOT recommended for the 6.7L Powerstrokes because of alcohol content which was harmful to the CP4. I realize that my 2018 Cummins owner's manual recommended Power Service products, but that was with the old, more tolerant CP3 pump. I'm not sure if they are still recommending them or not for 2019.

You got me at Motocraft. Not particularly convincing; unless, of course, we see a Blue Oval branded CP4.5 at their dealerships soon. Since when did we take the word of the folks who decided that CK-4 didn't meet the specs of their mediocre "value added" oil.

I run Motorcraft anti gel in the extreme cold weather because it was specifically safe for the CP4 pump.

Yes. Demulsifiers are a far safer bet than emulsifiers & additives that "safely pass water through the injectors". Diesel 911 is utter junk. There's far better emergency de-icers available. Amsoil's Diesel Recovery comes to mind; though I get some folks don't like the brand, it just plain works. Without destroying fuel separators/filters.

Be very careful of emulsifiers and water absorbers in many of the popular additives. They cause water to be absorbed into the diesel and can no longer be separated or filtered by the truck, allowing water to get into the CP4 pump and cause damage. Diesel 911 is bad too.
 
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