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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
easier to do that way for sure, but the load is dampened through the smaller joints on the drag link rather than the beefier wheel to wheel tierod. i can see your castor adjusters are still in the "0" position
That's an older picture. I adjusted the Caster/ Castor (lets not get back into the argument over the correct spelling) late last night .

I don't have my DIY alignment tools yet , so I just looked at the caster split between the two, maxed out the one that was closest, and kept the same approx spread with the other.

POST EDIT:
Here's what the caster adjuster looks like now (sorry for the poor pic quality)
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...should be called as steering damper because its to dampen the roadshock...
It is called a steering damper, but since we're already straying from using the correct wording, I figured it was easier to call it what most people do.
 
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Just do not call it a steering dampner .
 
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Discussion Starter #86 (Edited)
So after rotating the tires (putting the good ones on the front) and adjusting the caster angle pretty much to the max, I took the truck out for a 10 mile test drive.

I couldn't get it to wobble and I tried everything I could think of from hitting bumps and lots of transitions through unbalanced to balanced states with the centramatic tire balancers. (both accelerating and decelerating while turning).

The truck still tracks straight at speed with no hands on the wheel and still brakes in a straight line (also with no hands on the wheel). The only obvious difference is now the steering wheel is slightly off center (looks like I'm turning to the left a little when going in a straight line) and there is a very small (like really VERY small) increase in steering effort required.

I'm happy with it but I'm not ready to call it a win yet as its only been 10 miles of driving (but those 10 miles were pretty dang good as far as wobble goes).
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So after rotating the tires (putting the good ones on the front) and adjusting the caster angle pretty much to the max, I took the truck out for a 10 mile test drive.

I couldn't get it to wobble and I tried everything I could think of from hitting bumps and lots of transitions through unbalanced to balanced states with the centramatic tire balancers. (both accelerating and decelerating while turning).

The truck still tracks straight at speed with no hands on the wheel and still brakes in a straight line (also with no hands on the wheel). The only obvious difference is now the steering wheel is slightly off center (looks like I'm turning to the left a little when going in a straight line) and there is a very small (like really VERY small) increase in steering effort required.

I'm happy with it but I'm not ready to call it a win yet as its only been 10 miles of driving (but those 10 miles were pretty dang good as far as wobble goes).
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its almost like what i said would happen, exactly happened lol
 

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I have my fingers crossed for you.:)
 

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He did change 2 things at once .
Admittitaly the same 3 ply sidewall tires .........

I still say its the steering dampner. lol.
 

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He did change 2 things at once .
Admittitaly the same 3 ply sidewall tires .........
again, the tires have nothing to do with actual deathwobble vs various vibrations. Load range E tires are super overkill for any pickup running unloaded anyway, so the D range the km2/km3 tires are more than capable of providing good directional stability
 

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I ran D rated Bridgestone AT's on my 24v. The result was cuts,flats and finally a catastrophic complete tread delamination causing $3300 damage in seconds. With the heavy diesel the engineers spec'd out E's.
 

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I ran D rated Bridgestone AT's on my 24v. The result was cuts,flats and finally a catastrophic complete tread delamination causing $3300 damage in seconds. With the heavy diesel the engineers spec'd out E's.
run them at the pressures specified for the load and you wont have a problem. cuts are your problem, stop running into things

personally ive run P metric tires on my old 2wd truck. maxed out on manufacture pressure spec, they held up okay. just wore a little quicker than a harder stiffer LT tire, but road alot better lol
 

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Discussion Starter #94
I took the truck on a little trip (about 600 miles total) out to the MIL's house in west Texas where these speed limit signs exist
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Truck didn't ever go into "Death Wobble" during the trip. I still have a little work to do because the steering wheel is still a little off center and at certain speed while cornering the wheel will still start to rock a little , nothing bad that causes me concern (like the death wobble did), or even anything I need to slow down for. It's probably just a fact of life living with 37" mud tires on a heavy diesel truck . I'll probably switch to a different tire when these wear out to see if that helps (I have read a lot of negative things about BFG's on solid axles diesels)

Oh and threw some new brake pads on the jealous truck after I got home.

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goood. with food parts is typically always CASTER. for future reference, tires with choppy treadblocks like that are victims are shotty shocks.
 
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