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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's the deal. If you've read the "1st Diesel Ever" thread you know my 99 2500 I just bought Thursday has a cracked block. I knew I would be replacing the motor at some point due to the 209K miles on it but hoped to get a couple years of use from it first. So, I've been reading about two products; Moroso Ceramic Engine Seal & K&W Block sealer. I don't have 6-8 grand to put into this vehicle right now, so I was wondering if you guys have ever tried either of these products and what was the result? The engine hasn't even come close to overheating, by the way.
 

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ive used the bars copper stop leak from auto parts stores for around 7 bucks. its worked really well for me as a temporary fix. thats my recomendation. as for the products you listed, i have no clue. you might just try a google search if you havent already.
 

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I have heard the best temporary fix is lock and stick , but I didn't hear about how long it holds up.
 

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I was in your shoes about 3 months ago. And i tried the so called "Steel Seal". Well, it worked for 2 days then started leaking out the crack. After i tore the motor down, i found the stuff clogged up everything, my radiator, heater core, there was crud all over the oil cooler, inside the block, it was nasty. I should of just bought my new block before i tried that. Now i have a 55 block, and overhauled everything. If you have the funds, do it right the first time.

IMO, its a very temperary seal becuase the usual 53 crack (on the water jacket) leaks when the motor heats up and spreads the crack. At least all the ones i have seen that was the issue.
 

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to fix it right have it pulled and stitched
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
to fix it right have it pulled and stitched

Is this the same as lock N Stitch? I checked it out visually but haven't made any phone calls. Yes, if I had the cash I would replace the motor today. Unfortunately, I do not at this time and only want this thing to last as long as possible for the least amount of money as possible. What do I have to lose? What's the worst that could happen...a cracked block? I already have that covered. Thanks for the info. I did google these products but wanted some input from diesel guys. I read where a few gas guys had great success but as I stated, they weren't diesels.
 

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I hear you bud, hope whatever you try out works. Just watch like I said about the sealant clogging other things up aswell.
 

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In your shoes, I'd keep an eye in the classifieds. Had this been 2 months ago my friend sold a complete low mileage longblock for just over 1000. The deals are out there, just gotta find them. 209k isnt much for mileage btw.
 

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I was in your shoes about 3 months ago. And i tried the so called "Steel Seal". Well, it worked for 2 days then started leaking out the crack. After i tore the motor down, i found the stuff clogged up everything, my radiator, heater core, there was crud all over the oil cooler, inside the block, it was nasty. I should of just bought my new block before i tried that. Now i have a 55 block, and overhauled everything. If you have the funds, do it right the first time.

IMO, its a very temperary seal becuase the usual 53 crack (on the water jacket) leaks when the motor heats up and spreads the crack. At least all the ones i have seen that was the issue.
If you don't mind me asking did you do the work yourself or have someone else switch the internals over and what was the final tab? I bought a non 53 block just in case and wondered what the cost would be.
 

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Buying a bare block isn't worth it in my opinion unless you're going to be turning up the wick pretty hard... you can buy complete longblocks for a grand-1500. Doing a block only swap means bearings, gaskets, and head resurfacing at a minimum.

I got my motor 3 days after looking for one.
 

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Here's the deal. If you've read the "1st Diesel Ever" thread you know my 99 2500 I just bought Thursday has a cracked block. I knew I would be replacing the motor at some point due to the 209K miles on it but hoped to get a couple years of use from it first. So, I've been reading about two products; Moroso Ceramic Engine Seal & K&W Block sealer. I don't have 6-8 grand to put into this vehicle right now, so I was wondering if you guys have ever tried either of these products and what was the result? The engine hasn't even come close to overheating, by the way.
the problem with the stop leak stuff is it clogs up everything, and can turn a simple fix into a nightmare, there are so many passages in these block that you can accidentally seal off and force bigger issues.

since you did figure out its a cracked block, there are some things you can do.

1. Lock and stitch, if done correctly it will fix the problem, then you need to get the lock and stitch bracket,

2. drill out the metal plate your t-stat is on to prevent bad pressure buildup.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Buying a bare block isn't worth it in my opinion unless you're going to be turning up the wick pretty hard... you can buy complete longblocks for a grand-1500.

I live in Arizona. Where do you find short blocks that cheap?

Can the Lock N Stitch be done without removing the engine?
 

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Umm, put some effort forth, they are out there all the time...

I got on every classifieds page I could think of in the state, and got on a few of the offroad forums and put up a wtb ad... I got two emails in the same price range a few days after I bought the one I did...

But if you're expectin to find one with 5 minutes of looking, yeah, good luck.

Yes technically you can lock n stitch without pullin the motor, its just more tedious.
 
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If you don't mind me asking did you do the work yourself or have someone else switch the internals over and what was the final tab? I bought a non 53 block just in case and wondered what the cost would be.
I tore the 53 motor all down to bare block, she had 270,000 miles, and everything internal looked brand new. Still hone marks on the cylinder walls. There was nothing wrong with anything, Except for the block. I got a hold of a guy I talked to prior, and he happend to have a Fire-Ringed block he sold me. I was going to do it myself, but he gave me a good deal on putting it together. I sent the head and block out to Enterprize engine in Ohio, and the re groved the rings in the block, and bored it .20 over. And surfaced the head, also replacing 3 valves. I bought a .20 over complete rebuild kit off them, and from what the guy told me I didnt need new rods, the stock ones will hold power, and i wont be over reving my engine. I purchaced studs for them, along with A1 studs to hold the head down, and with a Schied street Cam. The guy that put it together had it back to me in about a week. And i did the rest myself. I still have the 53 block, along with the old crank, cam, rods and pistons. It might be my next project build one day. It took me a total of 4 weeks start to finish, working the evenings and weekends. But i also did more to the truck not just the motor while it was apart. I have ruffly $4K wrapped up in the project, and it was well worth it to me.

thanks, Nick
 

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Lock-n-stitch is expensive, $1500 parts or $2800 to have it done. If you are going to spend that money, replace the motor. My son's '99 2500 has a cracked 53 also. There was a post on here somewhere were a guy basically put RTV on the crack and bolted a plate over it with some success. I think that processed refined a bit may be a relatively inexpensive fix at least until you can afford the ultimate fix, a replacement. The idea is cut a plate of steel wider and longer than the crack. You would want the steel you use to have similiar or preferrably less heat expansion characteristics than the cast iron block. I doubt the surface of the block there is absolutely flat so some time might need to be spent forming the plate to the contour of the block. You want it to fit flush as can be. You would want to be able to use as many bolts as possible to ensure a tight of fit a possible. I am thinking small fine thread allen heads. I am thinking maybe a very thin piece of rubber to fit between the plate and the block to handle any block surface anomalies (gasket). Clean the crack are good and put heat tolerant sealant (RTV) into the crack area and let cure. Then apply sealant to underside of plate and bolt on. My thought is your attacking this several ways;

1. You have to expect the block is going to expand some, so using any sort of sealant that hardens will not work, it will just crack thus the RTV.
2. The plate bolted entirely around the crack will help a little with the expansion which is the problem here. Similiar to the logic behind the lock-n-braces.
3. Since there is not extreme coolant pressure it seems to me that if you can create a decent seal you can prevent cololant loss.

The general idea is seal, apply pressure and provide bracing for block expansion. If it works, it is not the end of the world to have ever so often to remove the plate clean the area up and replace rubber, sealant, etc. and replace. My thought is this is not a structural problem or will ever cause the block to fail enitrely so stop trying to weld or create any other type of hardened fix. Think of it more like a thermostat cover, put a gasket/sealant between the plate and the block, bolt and seal.

So if this idea sounds like horse s..t speak up but be nice remember I have a cracked block and I am already depressed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
At this point what do "we" have to lose. I also thought of heat resistant RTV. I have limited access to RTV that can hold up to EXTREME temperatures (aircraft jet engines - 700+ degrees C). Would aluminum work (more pliable)?
 

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I am not sure about aluminum. I don't know much about the expansion characteristics of the different metals but you certainly don't want something that expands more than cast iron because that could actually make the expansion problem worse. The idea here is pretty simple, stop trying to "fix" the crack (ain't going to happen) and just try and cap it off. If the plate can provide additional support to restrict the expansion of the block where it is weak all the better. Once I have thought this thru and decide to give it a try the hard part starts, trying to find a competent shop to do the work. I am expecting push back from them about doing work that is not by the book or proven to work. I am not capable of doing the work myself. I need a good mechanic or machine shop that can do the drilling and tapping. The rest is pretty staight forward.
 

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I am not sure about aluminum. I don't know much about the expansion characteristics of the different metals but you certainly don't want something that expands more than cast iron because that could actually make the expansion problem worse. The idea here is pretty simple, stop trying to "fix" the crack (ain't going to happen) and just try and cap it off. If the plate can provide additional support to restrict the expansion of the block where it is weak all the better. Once I have thought this thru and decide to give it a try the hard part starts, trying to find a competent shop to do the work. I am expecting push back from them about doing work that is not by the book or proven to work. I am not capable of doing the work myself. I need a good mechanic or machine shop that can do the drilling and tapping. The rest is pretty staight forward.
so has your block been fixed yet? if not i am wondering if you could drill your t-stat plate and see if that does slow the growth of the crack or the leak.

I heard that from a Cummisn mechanic, and i did it to my 53 block but mine is not cracked so im not sure if what he says id true.

He said by drillign the t-stat it relieve block pressure that causes the crack/:confused013:
 

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No mine has not fixed. I think the suggestion to reduce the pressure is a good one done in conjunction with the what I have suggested above. It would increase the likelyhood of being able to "cap off" the crack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Do you know how big (what size drill bit) to use.
 
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