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GAmes - Care to expand on sulfer in diesel not being a lubricant? Did some searching and everything I am finding says it indeed helps increase lubrication.
Really? Did you sleep through all your high school science classes? Sulfur is a corrosive and when burned it is a poison. There are some greases used in heavy machinery that incorporate sulfur in the mix. The machinery has sacrificial metal on the bearing surfaces that serve as lubrication while the sulfur erodes it away.
 

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GAmes - Care to expand on sulfer in diesel not being a lubricant? Did some searching and everything I am finding says it indeed helps increase lubrication.
Sulfer is not a lubricant. When it burns its a poison. The process of removing sulfur from diesel fuel also removes some of the lubricating properties.
Then thet add more lubricants to the fuel.

If there was a problem with the fuel not lubricating we would have masses of old trucks losing fuel pumps and injectors.

My neighbors cat 3406B has been chugging for over a million miles since before the 5.9 was even designed. Original fuel pump.
 

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GAmes, first off, chill out. No need to come out of the gates swinging. You and I have been down this road before. Chill. Let me rephrase my question before you pop a head gasket. The reading I did said that in the process of removing sulfer from diesel there are also essential naturally occurring lubricants that get removed as well. That ULSD may have less lubrication than the previous pre 2006, I believe was the year, diesel fuel.

Here is what I read, Published by: North Dakota State University

"However, the process used to reduce the sulfur content in diesel also reduces the fuel's lubricating properties, resulting in increased wear on the various parts of the engine's fuel injection system.”

https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/news/newsreleases/2007/march-8-2007/ultra-low-sulfur-diesel-fuel-affects-lubrication/
 

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There is nothing there that suggests that sulfur is a lubricant. "the process used to reduce the sulfur content in diesel also reduces the fuel's lubricating properties" is a true statement. What they fail to note, just as Schaeffer does, is point out that those lubricity agents are added back into the diesel prior to it being sold to the consumer. "In order to ensure a proper lubricity, lubricity additives are often injected to the fuel at the distribution sites of the key ULSD refiners and producers and prior to sale to the reseller or wholesaler. "
You ask, why do they say "often" instead of always? It is because even after the removal of sulfur the fuel might still be up to par. "Following exhaustive field and laboratory test data, in 2005, a lubricity standard was introduced into the existing ASTM D975 calling for a maximum wear scar of 520 microns as determined by the newly established ASTM D6751 HFRR test method."
https://fueloilnews.com/2010/03/04/taking-the-mystery-out-of-lubricity/

The article you presented is nothing more than a pitch for biodiesel.

I had to laugh at one of the bullets. " Other diesel fuel lubricating additives are readily available, but are expensive if added at the manufacturers’ recommended rates." Biodiesel at the pump costs less than straight #2 only because of government subsidies. I use it when I find it to get some of my taxes back.
 

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Sulfer is not a lubricant. When it burns its a poison. The process of removing sulfur from diesel fuel also removes some of the lubricating properties.
Then thet add more lubricants to the fuel.

If there was a problem with the fuel not lubricating we would have masses of old trucks losing fuel pumps and injectors.

My neighbors cat 3406B has been chugging for over a million miles since before the 5.9 was even designed. Original fuel pump.
Actually the 5.9 Cummins was introduced at the same time has the Cat 3406B.
5.9 was introduced in 1984 for Case industrial equipment.
Cat 3406B was introduced in 1984 as a upgrade of the 3406A that was introduced around 1974
Your neighbors must be a later model 3406B because Cat had a issue with check valves coming loose on the early models, later fuel pumps had the check valves staked in to prevent them from popping loose.

When the first low sulfur fuels came out the Cummins engines with the PT pumps had issues with throttle shaft seal failures, Cummins introduced a improved seal design that eliminated the issue, although there where lots of rumors about accelerated component wear and failures I don't know of any that was proven to be directly related to LSF or ULSF.

I had personal experience with Cat fuel pump check valves and Cummins PT pump seal failures during those time periods
Drove and owned semis from 1978 till 2008, 3406A, 3406B, C15 Cats, VT903T, Big Cam 3 Cummins, 8V71, Series 60 Detroits.
 

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Also true of their fuel additive. "The engineering used to formulate ULSD strips away beneficial lubricity; this can cause fuel system wear and lead to clogged injectors and filters" No mention that lubricity agents are added back in before the fuel is dispensed at the pump. Clogged injectors and filters......really?

https://www.schaefferoil.com/fuel-additives.html

At least they finally removed the myth from their advertising that sulfur is a lubricant in diesel as lead is in gasoline. Their lack of credibility keeps me from even considering buying their products.
Ofelas complete rebel. Now use SoyShield in ULSD, traded off LTXz for Coopers.
Might let him know his Gilez pump and DD turn-down tip might literally fall off since schaeffers running through it.
 

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lmao.
 

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So I work at a place where I get free mobil 1 full synthetic 5-40 cj-4 oil. Is the cj-4 fine to use in our trucks?
 

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For 99.8% of Cummins owners, CJ-4 is just fine.
 

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Until you're the .2
 

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Sulfer is not a lubricant. When it burns its a poison. The process of removing sulfur from diesel fuel also removes some of the lubricating properties.
Then thet add more lubricants to the fuel.

If there was a problem with the fuel not lubricating we would have masses of old trucks losing fuel pumps and injectors.

My neighbors cat 3406B has been chugging for over a million miles since before the 5.9 was even designed. Original fuel pump.
Actually the 5.9 Cummins was introduced at the same time has the Cat 3406B.
5.9 was introduced in 1984 for Case industrial equipment.
Cat 3406B was introduced in 1984 as a upgrade of the 3406A that was introduced around 1974
Your neighbors must be a later model 3406B because Cat had a issue with check valves coming loose on the early models, later fuel pumps had the check valves staked in to prevent them from popping loose.

When the first low sulfur fuels came out the Cummins engines with the PT pumps had issues with throttle shaft seal failures, Cummins introduced a improved seal design that eliminated the issue, although there where lots of rumors about accelerated component wear and failures I don't know of any that was proven to be directly related to LSF or ULSF.

I had personal experience with Cat fuel pump check valves and Cummins PT pump seal failures during those time periods
Drove and owned semis from 1978 till 2008, 3406A, 3406B, C15 Cats, VT903T, Big Cam 3 Cummins, 8V71, Series 60 Detroits.
We had to change a couple seals on the "fuel pumps ". Other than that its been fine.

All of our trucks held out fine when ulsd came out. Mostly dt466/dt530s and 8.3 cummins. Couple weird issues here in there with the p pumps but not really.

We bought some newer internationals with maxxforces and they go through injectors and pumps like crazy.
 

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I’m gonna give some of that fancy CI-4 stuff from @dauntless89 place of employment a try next change.
 

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CI-4 was the stuff we used previous to 2007 when all the emission stuff hit big time. CJ-4 was designed for emissions, which we don’t have. I’m by no means any kind of expert on oil.
 

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You guys are right, it's the CI-4 that's really most ideal for aftertreatment-free trucks.

However, wear metal generation got much worse going from CJ-4 to CK-4 than it did from CI-4 to CJ-4.
 

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So.....
Back to the PDD Oil.
Full circle and congratulations!
 
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