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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all: I am new here and have a few questions about my tranny in my 96 2500 std. cab 12v diesel My motor has a boost elbow and a 0 plate K&N filter in stock airbox, straight pipe exhaust, makes 39 lbs of boost, But I have no idea what HP it makes. My question is.. My tranny is 13 years old and the only problem is the converter seems to be warn bad. It rev's to full rpm and stays there for all shifts untill it hits lock up then it pulls down. But if I step into it at too low of a RPM it will slip the disk in the converter pretty bad then lock up. That is with no load on a freeway on ramp. I did pull my pan and do a filter change last night thinking I would find a lot of clutch material in the pan or shinny parts and I found almost nothing even with 13 years on it. No burnt fluid also. I want to put a new low stall converter in it but was wondering if I could get away with a single disk billet cover converter or do I need to go with a 3 disk converter????
I haul stuff very rare but have been known to haul a fork lift on a trailer that weights 21,000 lbs with the trailer. But I do haul cars on a trailer a few time a year. Oh and I am a lead foot around town.... Nothing I own is ever fast enough He He.

What are your thoughts on my just installing a new converter in this trans?

Thanks for all your replys.

Tom H.
 

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assuming the trans is stock, I am shocked it still functions with a 0 plate on the pump

id go thru the trans when you do the TC
 

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My trans started doing what you described. I doubt it is the converter slipping- the vanes don't usually go bad. Could be wrong though.- usually it is the lock up clutch that gos out.

Your clutch plates in the trans are likely slipping.

The stock trans is barely able to handle stock torque. Any increase and it is going to slip.

My trans lasted 2 months after adding a turbo and injectors. The trans had a billet converter and a heavy duty stock rebuild with less than 20k.

After 5k over haul with a triple disk all was well. I put twins on the truck and started slipping the trans again. Increasing the line pressure from 150psi to 180psi solved the slippage and made for some very firm shifts.

If your trans is not already beyond the point of no return...

You can increase line pressure from stock 120psi or less to the 150-160psi range and increase the holding power of the clutch packs. The converter will function better with more line pressure also.

You should install a shift kit.

Single disk is fine for 400hp and under over that you will want a triple.

As last ditch effort you can fill the trans with type F or even better Tractor hydraulic fluid. I run about a 60/40 mix of Dextron and Tractor fluid.
Just changing the fluid will feel like you put in a shift kit!

I also tried the tractor fluid in my dying trans and it bought me a couple more months of usable service before I limped it in to the trans shop.

Wish I would have learned about line pressure sooner.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I bought a shift kit for the valve body and will install it myself but I dont rebuild trannys myself. The tranny was rebuilt by Aamco 13 years ago when I was on a road trip back east. It had fluid running out the front of the tranny pump seal but they still charged me $1600 to fix it and take out my HD converter and put in one of there stock converters. I had to them out to get my old converter back as they only charged me $35 for the core. So all in all I would just be putting a shift in it and a new converter. I was wondering if the new single disk converters were any better that the old ones 13 years ago????

Thanks


I guess I will have to look into the line pressure thing and see what it takes to adjust it.

P.S. I also installed a converter lock up switch on the dash a few months ago and it works very well to lock the converter at most any speed after the 2nd. gear shift. I use it as a fuel saver really because the trans just rev's its off with what seems like the converter just slipping????
 

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The main thing you will notice on a converter is the stall rpm.

The vanes are set closer to each other for a low stall or farther apart to allow more fluid bypass for a higher stall. Low stall converters lighten the load on the clutch packs by slipping less and tend make the trans last longer.

The stock converter is designed to work well at stock power levels and quickly can be out of it league when torque gos up.

For the daily driver that does any work at all a low stall converter will work better. It will make it harder to burn out of the line, but will help you to take advantage of all the low rpm grunt these engines put out. I can drive aggressively all over town and get on the freeway with out ever breaking the 2000rpm mark.

The higher stall converters are better suited to drag race trucks with big turbos that don't even start to make power until 2000rpms.
 

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Thanks


I guess I will have to look into the line pressure thing and see what it takes to adjust it.
Line pressure is easy to adjust, you need a trans pressure gauge to see where your at, available for cheap from the Harbor place. To check pressure note the reading at WOT in drive with the converter locked. I would bet your at 100psi or less. After you know where your at you drop the pan and on the passenger side of the valve body there is an Allen head bolt that adjusts line pressure.

If you do a search there is a good thread with pics on the subject.
 
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