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Discussion Starter #22
This is harder than I thought it would be hahaha. PS vs Stanadyne additive. The research continues I guess.
 

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Power Service works fine.
 
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This is harder than I thought it would be hahaha. PS vs Stanadyne additive. The research continues I guess.
There are lots to pick from out there, and I don't think I've heard of one that doesn't work when it comes to prevent gelling.

If you throw how they deal with water, the lubricity and such, into the mix you have plenty to read up on.
 

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There are lots to pick from out there, and I don't think I've heard of one that doesn't work when it comes to prevent gelling.

If you throw how they deal with water, the lubricity and such, into the mix you have plenty to read up on.
Surely you aren't suggesting doing independent research? :rof :stirpot:
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I have no problem doing research and have done quite a bit. After a while, you start hearing the same thing over and over. "This is the best product because" lines get old.
 

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I have no problem doing research and have done quite a bit. After a while, you start hearing the same thing over and over. "This is the best product because" lines get old.
What I had in mind was various places doing testing, presenting the results in chart form, and then the pros and cons can be weighed by you.

Yes, most of them have the same 25 or so listed, but the results aren't always quite the same.
What looks like a top contender in one test may not do so well in another...more research for you.

Since you wrote "...hearing the same thing..." it could be because you rely on You Tube.
I wouldn't.
 

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Run Howe’s or power services in my class 8 trucks. I know they start to blend diesel fuel up here and tbh my truck returns enough fuel that the tanks are warm. But water gets in fuel and filters. I use it and never froze up. Others have around me that don’t. Good enough for me. Power services is white in winter grey in summer. And 911 for emergency lol but don’t use it.
 

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Terrible advice right here. Mine gelled up last winter on a fresh tank, first time in 15 years of running the truck as a daily in "northern" Canada. Root cause? I added a remote fuel filter kit with a finer media which trapped the fine ice/wax particulate which normally passed through the stock filter. So, the finer your filtration is, the more susceptible you are to freeze up.

Also, winter diesel is not treated, it has the same additives that summer diesel has. In colder months refineries optimize production to produce a lighter diesel blend (specific gravity) which has a lower cloud/pour points. It also contains lower BTU's.
So since your truck gelled up once in 15 years in one of the coldest climates on the planet, it's bad advice?
ROFLMAO.....You even quoted the part about there being exceptions.
And, presuming you're an oil expert up there in the patch, maybe read up on different types of winter diesel. Some are #1/#2 blend, some are additives to #2.
I'm a shadetree diesel exspurt too. Have had diesels from the N Slope to SE AK, Cascades, Rockies, upper midwest. That about covers cold climates on this continent anyway. I've pre-emptively added anti gel additives a few times when record cold snaps and truck parked outside getting cold soaked, or driving from one climate to another but it's not necessary in the vast majority of conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Terrible advice right here. Mine gelled up last winter on a fresh tank, first time in 15 years of running the truck as a daily in "northern" Canada. Root cause? I added a remote fuel filter kit with a finer media which trapped the fine ice/wax particulate which normally passed through the stock filter. So, the finer your filtration is, the more susceptible you are to freeze up.

Also, winter diesel is not treated, it has the same additives that summer diesel has. In colder months refineries optimize production to produce a lighter diesel blend (specific gravity) which has a lower cloud/pour points. It also contains lower BTU's.
So since your truck gelled up once in 15 years in one of the coldest climates on the planet, it's bad advice?
ROFLMAO.....You even quoted the part about there being exceptions.
And, presuming you're an oil expert up there in the patch, maybe read up on different types of winter diesel. Some are #1/#2 blend, some are additives to #2.
I'm a shadetree diesel exspurt too. Have had diesels from the N Slope to SE AK, Cascades, Rockies, upper midwest. That about covers cold climates on this continent anyway. I've pre-emptively added anti gel additives a few times when record cold snaps and truck parked outside getting cold soaked, or driving from one climate to another but it's not necessary in the vast majority of conditions.
I'm in fairbanks and eagle river!!
 

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^^ And I'm jealous!
We lived in ER for about a year n a half when I had a project on the Slope. I'd move back in a heartbeat.
Pro tip, go to Mikes Meats. Cheaper than the grocery store and better meat!
And S&P auto in ER is an honest fair priced repair shop, or at least they were a few years ago.
Diagnosed my bad injectors for $100 and then suggested I could do it cheaper at home since I sounded like I knew what I was talking about. But he was only going to charge $100 a piece labor.
Also was the only shop that didn't try to rip me off when I needed a clutch replaced. No tools, had just shipped our goods back to the L48 and clutch took a dump.
I mail ordered a new clutch (at his recommendation, again, it'l be cheaper if you buy the parts than if I buy them and you'll get what you want) and picked the truck up a couple months later when I came back up from WA to work. Great shop.
Got to know lots of folks in and around town there, just a great place to live.
Oh, and never put any anti gel additive in the truck in Eagle River either.
 

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Eagle River and especially Fairbanks can get pretty cold. My personal Alaska record was -38 in Wasilla. Brother lives in Eagle River so I've been up there a lot. Everything he drives is plugged in during the winter. I would definitely be running an additive like PS or Optilube XPD, and carrying some PS 911 with me. I run the heated version of the FASS Titanium since the weather gets pretty cold here as well. I don't take any chances on fuel gelling. I've had too many bad experiences trying to get frozen equipment and vehicles to start in the winter. Miserable work under bad conditions. Hate using ether and don't like that hammering sound when they finally do start. It seems that winter exploits every weakness in your vehicle.
 
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I just use the stuff that comes out of the pump here. Never had a gelling issue ever in 20 years of running diesels. It gets down to -45°C (-49°f) here every year at least once. -40 is a regular hits several times, and -30 is fairly normal for winter.

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Lived in north Iowa for 15 years, I saw temps to -35 below an all I used was Power Service white bottle along with 2 stroke oil, from those who I know that did gel up it was from either buying diesel in one area that was not winterized and then drive in to an area that had very cold temps or flat out buying non winterized diesel and did not use anti gel additive.. Also be very careful if you run Bio Diesel in the wintertime, as I heard of many who had gel problems thus I always stayed away from Bio Diesel anytime the temp was forecast to get below 32 degrees..
 

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^Good call on watchin out for bio in the winter. An indicator is, if the pumps are filtered and the fuel appears to be coming out of the nozzle slower than it should, there may be some gellin going on.
 

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So since your truck gelled up once in 15 years in one of the coldest climates on the planet, it's bad advice?
ROFLMAO.....You even quoted the part about there being exceptions.
And, presuming you're an oil expert up there in the patch, maybe read up on different types of winter diesel. Some are #1/#2 blend, some are additives to #2.
I'm a shadetree diesel exspurt too. Have had diesels from the N Slope to SE AK, Cascades, Rockies, upper midwest. That about covers cold climates on this continent anyway. I've pre-emptively added anti gel additives a few times when record cold snaps and truck parked outside getting cold soaked, or driving from one climate to another but it's not necessary in the vast majority of conditions.
^Good call on watchin out for bio in the winter. An indicator is, if the pumps are filtered and the fuel appears to be coming out of the nozzle slower than it should, there may be some gellin going on.


Yeah you assumed wrong, I work at a refinery. I engineer/program/maintain the the units that blend the diesel before it's loaded into the tanker trucks and hauled off to the stations. The lab that does cloud/pour testing on our fuels is a 30 second walk from my office. I don't need to read up on winter diesel, I do it for a living. I'll let you in on a little secret, there are far more than 2 diesel blends, well over a hundred in our system last I checked.

Oh, and biodiesel isn't sold in the colder months, it's blended in summer only. You are wasting your time with the highly scientific nozzle eyeball flow test. (PS- fuel is generally stored underground at most gas stations where it is much warmer and doesn't gel).


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Yeah you assumed wrong, I work at a refinery. I engineer/program/maintain the the units that blend the diesel before it's loaded into the tanker trucks and hauled off to the stations. The lab that does cloud/pour testing on our fuels is a 30 second walk from my office. I don't need to read up on winter diesel, I do it for a living. I'll let you in on a little secret, there are far more than 2 diesel blends, well over a hundred in our system last I checked.

Oh, and biodiesel isn't sold in the colder months, it's blended in summer only. You are wasting your time with the highly scientific nozzle eyeball flow test. (PS- fuel is generally stored underground at most gas stations where it is much warmer and doesn't gel).


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Most stations around me and north of me in
Manitoba,Canada have above ground fuel tanks for diesel.
 
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