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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not new to the diesel world, however I'm new to it in an area that gets 20-30 below, with no problem. I've done some research and found that there are a million different additives that all claim to be the best. From what you guys have used, what is the best option, in your opinion, for anti-gel additives to keep your fuel flowing?
 

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I use Power Service Diesel Kleen. Gray bottle in the summer, white bottle in winter and a spare bottle of PS 911 in the truck for emergencies. I've also used Optilube but it's a bit more expensive.
 

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I use Power Service Diesel Kleen. Gray bottle in the summer, white bottle in winter and a spare bottle of PS 911 in the truck for emergencies. I've also used Optilube but it's a bit more expensive.
Same here. Coldest day last winter was -25f and the truck started with ease.
 

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You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Once in Denver, all the diesels gelled up about 10 years ago. Got a -30 cold snap and it was later determined that the local fuel was only being treated to -10F. I was working in Denver, all our equipment gelled up. Not a bottle of 911 to be had by 8am, trucks scattered on the sides of the roads everywhere. I drove up into the mountains and bought a couple cases of 911 for the job. Probably could have made some bank driving around town selling it for $50 a bottle!

Other places to look out for are particularly low alt warm climates that are near mountains. IE you could buy fuel in Vegas and gel up in Utah because you could make it there in 1 tank of fuel. There's actually signs on I -15 going North out of Mesquite NV that they sell winter blend fuel. Last winter we were down in Vegas/Mesquite and then went up to Park City. 70 deg 1 day, -15 that night. I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.
 

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I was working in Leadville CO a few years ago. I was filling up in Grand Junction (cheapest fuel on my drive), and making a round trip to Leadville and back to GJ for fuel for my drive back to Utah. I used Howes, mixed it just as the bottle recommends. Typically saw -20 to -30 at 11400' elevation.

I carried a little plastic measuring cup with me. I marked it with 10g, 20g, and 30g marks, so I could quickly measure out the additive based on my tank fill while at the pump.
 

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You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.

There are exceptions, but they're rare.I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.
I'm a prime example of being an exception. Not driving my 3500 all that often (it is a tow vehicle after all) and having 74 gallons on board, I frequently end up running summer fuel in the winter, and vice versa.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Once in Denver, all the diesels gelled up about 10 years ago. Got a -30 cold snap and it was later determined that the local fuel was only being treated to -10F. I was working in Denver, all our equipment gelled up. Not a bottle of 911 to be had by 8am, trucks scattered on the sides of the roads everywhere. I drove up into the mountains and bought a couple cases of 911 for the job. Probably could have made some bank driving around town selling it for $50 a bottle!

Other places to look out for are particularly low alt warm climates that are near mountains. IE you could buy fuel in Vegas and gel up in Utah because you could make it there in 1 tank of fuel. There's actually signs on I -15 going North out of Mesquite NV that they sell winter blend fuel. Last winter we were down in Vegas/Mesquite and then went up to Park City. 70 deg 1 day, -15 that night. I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.
You're probably totally right. I never thought of that and I have no idea why lol. There's no way they are selling untreated diesel up here! It would gel up in their pumps.
 

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You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Don't be so sure there. I've seen plenty of #1 fuel gel before. My 3rd gen hasn't ever gelled on me but it was a regular fight with my 1st gen prior to the Piston lift pump conversion. Of course, I'm talking about temps of -45* and colder for weeks at a time.

I use Stanadyne performance formula and Walmart 2-stroke all winter long and rarely have issues. Power service in a pinch if I didn't pack my Stanadyne for a trip.
 

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Fuel can be hit or miss. How often the station fills their tanks. How well is it blended. Not all fuel is the same, they have different blends. I've been mid winter in a northern state and had fuel gel. Dont count on the fuel station to get it right.
 

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I also treat mine for year-round coverage, Gray bottle for 8 months, white bottle for the 4 Winter months.
Also Walmart 2-stroke year-round.
 

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You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Terrible advice right here. Mine gelled up last winter on a fresh tank, first time in 15 years of running the truck as a daily in "northern" Canada. Root cause? I added a remote fuel filter kit with a finer media which trapped the fine ice/wax particulate which normally passed through the stock filter. So, the finer your filtration is, the more susceptible you are to freeze up.

Also, winter diesel is not treated, it has the same additives that summer diesel has. In colder months refineries optimize production to produce a lighter diesel blend (specific gravity) which has a lower cloud/pour points. It also contains lower BTU's.
 

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Terrible advice right here. Mine gelled up last winter on a fresh tank, first time in 15 years of running the truck as a daily in "northern" Canada. Root cause? I added a remote fuel filter kit with a finer media which trapped the fine ice/wax particulate which normally passed through the stock filter. So, the finer your filtration is, the more susceptible you are to freeze up.
Was that under the frame and with no fuel heater? I've personally never had or seen that problem with -30* C and mighty Donaldson filtration. Never even seen frame mounted filters do that in -30* C with good ol' Canadian diesel.
 

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Was that under the frame and with no fuel heater? I've personally never had or seen that problem with -30* C and mighty Donaldson filtration. Never even seen frame mounted filters do that in -30* C with good ol' Canadian diesel.
Under the hood horn mount. Kept the stocker with the heater.

May be fine with just the stock filter element (which we all know is inadequate), but if you add more efficient filtration you should definitely consider low temp additives.
 

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interesting, I've heard of that for under frame filters with no heater but never for under hood ones.
 

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Yeah, my underhood has been through some cold Utah nights -20ºf.
I don't recall ever reading a post about gelling for under hood ones.
 
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