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Discussion Starter #1
I've read MANY threads on the coolant bypass issues/solutions.

I've deleted my heater core as there's just no need for it where I live (cough*Hawaii*cough):grin2:...

Now...I've routed my stock heater feed straight to the return fitting to loop it.

I'd like to get rid of that top fitting and hose and thought maybe I could tap into my coolant temp port at the back of the head, route that coolant to the heater core return fitting, plug the stock feed port. This would help cool the #6 cylinder and still allow flow through the engine? Will this work?

Is it necessary for my use? No...but looking for input.

Thanks.

BJ
 

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Discussion Starter #2
i guess i'm on my own for this one, and therefore will probably err to side of caution then :).

BJ
 

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i guess i'm on my own for this one, and therefore will probably err to side of caution then :).

BJ
Don’t have experience using a coolant bypass but you should have no issue plugging the heater core lines since the factory one has a valve that’s closed when the heater is not in use. Would be a cleaner look than looping the lines.
 

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That's to keep it from plugging up.
 

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I believe he is thinking of a first gen heater core circuit, where there is a vacuum actuated valve on the feed side near the firewall.

In regards to the op, I too have thought of doing something similar but could never get a straight answer as to whether it would work alright.
 

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I believe he is thinking of a first gen heater core circuit, where there is a vacuum actuated valve on the feed side near the firewall.
The second gens don’t have that? I could have swore the one I just parted out (a 1994) did. And I can tell you the first gen one flows zero when it is closed. I apologize to the OP if I am wrong. Maybe that’s why first and second gens have different thermostats?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The second gens don’t have that? I could have swore the one I just parted out (a 1994) did. And I can tell you the first gen one flows zero when it is closed. I apologize to the OP if I am wrong. Maybe that’s why first and second gens have different thermostats?
Although I disconnected my heater core lines (and looped in - out on the engine), I did install a new heater core (blocked openings) in case i wanted to use again in the future, and there were no valves in that coolant circuit.

BJ
 

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Aside from the difference in diameter, first & second gen 12v stats are both 180f.

The single seal first gen uses it's jiggle pin to burp air, while the dual seal second gen uses the jiggle valve in the head.

Now ya got me thinking - I can't recall whether the second gen 12v uses a vacuum actuator in the heater line circuit or not.

On the first gens, the vacuum valve only shuts off flow in the OFF & Max AC positions.
 

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Aside from the difference in diameter, first & second gen 12v stats are both 180f.

The single seal first gen uses it's jiggle pin to burp air, while the dual seal second gen uses the jiggle valve in the head.

Now ya got me thinking - I can't recall whether the second gen 12v uses a vacuum actuator in the heater line circuit or not.

On the first gens, the vacuum valve only shuts off flow in the OFF & Max AC positions.
2nd gens do not have this valve.
 
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