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...either way being fully debt free within another 5 years

At the time i averaged around 75 hours a week, in 5 day. And it wasn't unheard of me to be pushing 90, with several weeks that went over 100 hours. I'm sorry, but if i work more in a week, then you do in 2-3 weeks, what does that say about your drive to put yourself in a better living situation?
Congratulations, Loki. It may not be the American way, but apparently you have figured out that being debt free is a very good thing.
And you have (are) working your butt off to get there, which you'll find worth it in the end.
 

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I have around 200k of "debt" but it's all equitable being that it's my house/property, that's nearly doubled in value in the last 5 years. Which is exactly why i bought where i did
That's how you make easy money. I asked my wife last year if she wanted to buy a townhouse/condo. She said, "No, that's another payment we have to make". I said, "What if someone made the payment for us?" She looked puzzled....... I preceded to tell her that we could buy a townhouse/condo and have property mangers keep it rented for us. She didn't believe me, so I setup a meeting so she could talk to a few investors who were doing the same. They all confirmed what I said. It's easy to make money, but sometimes it requires patience and time.

Here i am, with no college degree making more money then ALOT of people with college degrees, all because i decided to go into blue collar work and work my way into the white collar side of it, without accruing massive college debt, and doing it faster then spending 4-8 years in college. Yet so many people still claim college is necessary....
The benefit of a college degree, in many cases, is that you can earn a good salary without having to work 45+ hours per week, plus the benefits (retirement, health insurance, vacation, sick leave, etc.) are usually pretty good. But I agree, you don't need a college degree to make good money. Being self-employed would be ideal. It's always best when you write you own checks and take vacation time when you want.

or is having excess time to do other things a sign of white privilege now?
Yes, but only if you are white. If you are brown, it doesn't count.
 

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Could that be because you are the modern educational system?
Seems like it's quite illogical to the rest of us.
No, it means that I'm open-minded, but if you weren't like CNN and cut off the rest of what I said, you would understand that I identified some illogic in it.

I understand what they are saying, but they shouldn't exclude the skilled worker. It should say, "The more educated and skilled you are, the more debt you have. That’s because higher education and skilled work tends to lead to higher income, and higher income oftentimes leads to higher spending.” There are educated people making $38,000 per year and there are skilled workers making $130,000 per year.
 

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That's how you make easy money.

I preceded to tell her that we could buy a townhouse/condo and have property mangers keep it rented for us. She didn't believe me, so I setup a meeting so she could talk to a few investors who were doing the same. They all confirmed what I said.

The benefit of a college degree, in many cases, is that you can earn a good salary without having to work 45+ hours per week, plus the benefits (retirement, health insurance, vacation, sick leave, etc.) are usually pretty good. But I agree, you don't need a college degree to make good money. Being self-employed would be ideal. It's always best when you write you own checks and take vacation time when you want.
I can't believe that those people told you to do exactly what they make their money on. Whoda thunk?
I have a couple of friends with rental properties, and their stories about what they have to deal with is more than enough to make me stay as far away from being a landlord as possible.

It's very interesting to me that you think that being self employed is ideal, especially for the reasons you mention.
I don't even know where to start, but "vacation" usually isn't even in the vocabulary for most, at least for the fist several years.

Also, paychecks per se aren't usually available, either, for many years. If the business makes money, it should go towards the business to help make it grow, not to you.
I fully understand why you don't don't know any of of this, but many of us in the private sector do.

You actually have to work, and as Loki mentioned, usually very long hours. That's a far cry from what you're used to.
Yep, been there, done that, too. It ultimately allowed me to sell my business and move to the USA, starting all over again, but I'm not complaining.
 

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The benefit of a college degree, in many cases, is that you can earn a good salary without having to work 45+ hours per week, plus the benefits (retirement, health insurance, vacation, sick leave, etc.) are usually pretty good. But I agree, you don't need a college degree to make good money. Being self-employed would be ideal. It's always best when you write you own checks and take vacation time when you want.
The real difference here is you either spend bunch of money, to pay for college, to have the opportunity to possibly pay off your college debt by the time your in your 30s, to be ready to take on another large debt in buying a house. the system perpetuates debt, which is why people going into blue collar fields often get shunned. Generally by people that believe the work to be below them, when those very same blue collar workers make more money then the shunners, while also aren't working off one debt to take on a second. Many college students work part or full time jobs outside of schooling, plus have 40+ hours of schooling every week. So in essence, they were doing the same thing i was, just they were paying to do it, while i got paid to do it. And generally speaking, most college educated persons tend not to be able to fix things and build things to the same level as blue collar workers. A good example is a buddy up the street from me, he decided to build a deck, and has no blue collar experience. not that he is incapable of it, he went to banking and is successful without a college degree as well. However, he didn't ask someone, like me for instance, for help to build his deck. he figured he could do it, so he decided to do it. With the help of the wisest of the internet. Due to his lack of experience, he skipped several steps early on that he didn't know were there, and eventually called me over to discuss options for fixing the issues well after the fact. His main issue was he assumed his house was square, which most are not. And he built everything out from the house, at identical lengths. Once he was ready to put on the actual decking, he quickly realized that his face board looked quite wavy, because his original starting point was not square, which made everything else get worse the further he went. While covering it up wasn't that hard, after 5 minutes i told him how to do it and everything was peachy. The simple fact was, that he lacked the original knowledge of how to do something, and when he attempted to learn online, a lot of information was skipped. But on the flip side of the coin, the missing knowledge is also why our dogs spent 6 hours inside the house yesterday while i was home, out in the back yard running string lines and digging holes. My hands on knowledge means that what i concreted in last night (while i was fighting to finish it by myself before a storm came in) is going to lead to a much better finished product then what he made. Practical knowledge and experience almost always beats out book smarts. I honestly don't see much point in college these days, it's more of an indoctrination location more then anything else. Who would've guessed that a 4 year degree in liberal arts and vegan studies would lead to serving people fast food for the rest of their life...
 

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No, it means that I'm open-minded...
Dang it, Rhett, we're right back to the dictionary again.

To me, open-minded means that one has the ability to consider and evaluate different opinions and ideas. Not that there's so much unused space in the mind that it seems logical to paint a fastener to keep it in place.
 

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And generally speaking, most college educated persons tend not to be able to fix things and build things to the same level as blue collar workers.
Hey, for once I can claim a bit of a victory here. Despite my education I can even put a grease cartridge into a grease gun the correct way, not having to rely on idiot proof versions.
 

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Idk the GI Bill worked well for me if I’m being honest. Doesn’t work for everyone though. Presently I have no school debt and I am happy about that. I know many who burn their benefit taking minimum classes and end up with 1/3 of a degree.

I have nothing but amazing respect for the trades work. I did it for a while after the Marines before I made the switch to the coolege Route.

Happy with my pieces of paper and hope to add another to the collection here before to long.


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To me, open-minded means that one has the ability to consider and evaluate different opinions and ideas. Not that there's so much unused space in the mind that it seems logical to paint a fastener to keep it in place.
It also means being comfortable with “being offended” as it enables critical thought clearly outside the personal perceptions an individual has or had .... something the Soy boys will never understand


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I can't believe that those people told you to do exactly what they make their money on. Whoda thunk?
In Red River, they want conservative minded people to own Townhouses/Condos. The owners shape of the culture, politics, and policies going forward. So yeah, they are willing to share when it comes to the right buyer.

I have a couple of friends with rental properties, and their stories about what they have to deal with is more than enough to make me stay as far away from being a landlord as possible.
Renting a condo/townhouse by the week, especially in an upscale area, is not your typical rental property. There are very few problems with renters in Red River. Property managers take care of all the cleaning, washing, toilet paper, etc. We got to learn about the different property managers, their styles, their cost, etc.

It's very interesting to me that you think that being self employed is ideal, especially for the reasons you mention.
Several of my good friends are self-employed. They work hard, but they also take a lot of time for family, vacation, etc.
 

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The real difference here is you either spend bunch of money, to pay for college, to have the opportunity to possibly pay off your college debt by the time your in your 30s, to be ready to take on another large debt in buying a house.
College doesn't have to be expensive. There are scholarships, grants, and financial aid that can make attending college very affordable, and in some cases free. There are many companies who will pay off student loans, too. So, there are many options for an affordable education. My undergraduate degree didn't cost me a dime, which included all living expenses. My master's degree was $11,000, but it bumped my annual salary by $15,000 per year, so it paid for itself rather quickly.

Here's a question from my Chapter 1 test when I taught a class called, "College and Career Readiness".

According to the 2001 U.S Census, college graduates earned $___ more during their lifetimes than high school graduates.

(A) $½ million
(B) $1 million

The answer is (B)
 

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I have about 12k in debt right now. Thats it.
That's good. Now go buy/build a home. ;)

Also I know lots of people that have degree's and don't do anything related to their degree, and still don't make near enough to cover their school payments.
Not working in your degree area is somewhat common. I didn't stay in my degree area, either.

If people can't make their minimum loan payments, that's because they overextended themselves. They might have taken some of their school loan monies and bought a new car with it, etc. Financial aid, much like a credit card, is handed out like candy.
 

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In Red River, they want conservative minded people to own Townhouses/Condos. The owners shape of the culture, politics, and policies going forward. So yeah, they are willing to share when it comes to the right buyer.



Renting a condo/townhouse by the week, especially in an upscale area, is not your typical rental property. There are very few problems with renters in Red River. Property managers take care of all the cleaning, washing, toilet paper, etc. We got to learn about the different property managers, their styles, their cost, etc.



Several of my good friends are self-employed. They work hard, but they also take a lot of time for family, vacation, etc.
Oh, okay, they obviously put your interest ahead of their own. That's unusual in the business world, but surely they mean well.

You have apparently found property managers that work for free, because they really are on your side. Good for you!
Do they have a promotional (I mean informative) YouTube channel by any chance? I'd like to learn about these kind people.

Are any of those self employed friends of yours working for the private sector, or are they milking the government like you are? There's usually a noticeable difference.
 

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For reference, here's what a student loan might look like:

Your Budget with $25,000 in Student Loans

(72% of student loan borrowers)

While no one wants to pay student loans, $25,000 in education debt is manageable for the average professional earning $30,000 to $40,000. Depending on a student’s eligibility, most (if not all) of this debt would be in government loans. Based on a 20-year term, installments would be around $150 per month. Looking at consumption data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it’s about the same amount the average household pays in a year for a used car. It’s slightly more than one-tenth of the average housing expense.



Your Budget with $50,000 in Student Loans

(16.5% of borrowers)

This is where graduates really start to feel the burden of student loans. Monthly payments are around $450, largely because private loans are necessary above $31,000 in tuition costs. It would be a tight budget for someone earning between $40,000 and $50,000. Student loans would be a large portion of the budget. You’d be paying about as much for loan payments as you would for food. Food is usually the third largest category in a household’s budget. Your monthly loan repayment would be about a third of what you are paying in housing costs.



Your Budget with $75,000 in Student Loans

(6% of borrowers)

The average college graduate would probably need to move back in with mom and dad at this point. It’s either that or find lots of roommates. You would likely be paying about $750 per month in student loans. The average graduate with a four-year degree earns about $43,000. At this income level, your loan payments would be your second-largest expense next to housing, and would be close to what you are spending in food and transportation combined. You would need to take drastic action to make loan payments, probably by foregoing any retirement savings and cutting back on entertainment. Even so, you might not be able to find ways to make ends meet. Someone earning around $60,000 could probably afford this payment more comfortably.
 

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Oh, okay, they obviously put your interest ahead of their own. That's unusual in the business world, but surely they mean well.
It's equal opportunity because in the world of condos and townhouses, we are all owners of the same building. We have to agree to HOA policies, major repairs, etc.

You have apparently found property managers that work for free, because they really are on your side. Good for you!
I don't know how you came to that conclusion. The property manages are in competition with each other.

Are any of those self employed friends of yours working for the private sector, or are they milking the government like you are? There's usually a noticeable difference.
All but one works in the private sector. My buddy, J-Nez, is x-military. He goes out in remote locations and disassembles missiles. Since he is native american, he gets all the contracts on the reservation, but he's been all over New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado. Those are government contracts, but he makes big $$$$ doing it.
 

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While no one wants to pay student loans...
Holy cow, are you really so indoctrinated by where you work that you really think that nobody wants to pay for what they get?!?

As far as I'm concerned you lost most, if not all, of your credibility when you posted party emojies when you learned that you'd get paid for staying home because of people getting sick, or even dying.

The hole you dug for yourself then is far deeper than your toy tractor could ever dream of digging, so maybe you should stop trying to make it even deeper?
 

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Holy cow, are you really so indoctrinated by where you work that you really think that nobody wants to pay for what they get?!?
For your information, I didn't write that.

As far as I'm concerned you lost most, if not all, of your credibility when you posted party emojies when you learned that you'd get paid for staying home because of people getting sick, or even dying.

The hole you dug for yourself then is far deeper than your toy tractor could ever dream of digging, so maybe you should stop trying to make it even deeper?
As I've said before, you can leave this group whenever you want. Nobody is making you read, subscribe to, or agree to anything.
 

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For your information, I didn't write that.

As I've said before, you can leave this group whenever you want. Nobody is making you read, subscribe to, or agree to anything.
No, I'm very well aware of your affection for copying and pasting.
Still, every now and then you write something of your own, and to me it is very interesting to get a glimpse of how things are in the parallel universe you seem to live in.

I can refrain from posting easily enough, but I hope you will allow me to keep reading the NM thread.
It's a very interesting read to me as you have presented so many things that defy logic and common sense. It's the same reason people like watching train wrecks, I suppose.
Although, train wrecks are generally quite predictable, which certainly can't be said for your posts.
 
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