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No, you don't need one. You can prove it to yourself by trying to insert the one you received in the kit into the hole. I'll bet it won't go in. You are in luck. The majority of people who replace the gear case cover don't bother with the tags.

If you rotate the engine you will see three of the bolts through the cam gear holes. There is also one up and to the left of the oil pump gear.
 

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I cant think of the proper term, but there is a clearly a "ridge" or something at the end of the hole where the pin sits, so it cant fall out.

Judging by the cheap screws holding my data plate on, and rtv. The killer dowel pin must have fallen out on my 98 years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I noticed my harmonic balancer is on its way out rubber failing. Do people replace the 4 bolts are they stretch bolts?
I’ll have to get another one or get upgraded fluid one. Not sure worth I’m not doing crazy mods just want reliable.

did water pump too.
 

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It is not a balancer it is a damper. A balancer would only mount in one position. The bolts are reusable. (but all bolts stretch, if they didn't they wouldn't clamp).I like my Fluidampre but for most people it is expensive and not needed. One of these days I'll remember to inspect it. They are not lifetime.
 

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So did I until I inquired directly to them. This is the e-mail I received back. I have 540k on mine.


Thank you for contacting Fluidampr. The recommended 500,000 mile replacement on our OTR dampers is when we have seen the silicone start to breakdown. The larger mass and temp conditions play a large roll in this. Fluidampr dampers do not have a number on “the life of the engine” due to many factors, which can include an improperly maintained engine that may not last nearly as long as a properly maintained engine. We have many dampers in the field exceeding high mileage. With a properly maintained engine, we have never had a Fluidampr performance damper fail. The mileage you stated I recommend you inspect the damper and proceed as normal.

Viscous dampers can be inspected for bulging in the cover (this can be done visually or if possible to access the damper using a straight edge to ensure there is no bulging of the cover on the welded side of the damper that faces out when installed), also check for any damage to the housing that could cause the internal inertia ring to not move freely. If no signs of damage are present there is no cause for concern. You can of course replace it if you would feel more comfortable. We do offer a trade in program, you would send us your old damper and we would replace it with a new damper at a reduced cost plus shipping and tax where applicable.
 

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It looks right and the pin IS in there. Yours looks just like my 97 did after I drove the pin all the way home. That pin doesn’t need to be any longer. As long as it out well into the aluminum case, it will work. I made my own tab and put it in with a little longer grade 10 bolt. Craig
 

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I guess I need to nail down which type I have and if I need any retainer then :)..... See images below. So you’re saying I don’t need one?
That machined aluminum dowel pin tab is a good design. It's the style I use. It flips to fit early and late case designs and, because of the depth of the part, it can't fall out even if the bolt loosens. Use loctite and torque to 18, so it does not loosen. There are a total of 9 bolts inside the cover that need checking. All but one can be removed by rotating the crankshaft. I use a barring tool and a 3 foot extension to rotate the crank. One bolt can't be removed, but can be loosened, brake cleaner, and wicking loctite put on it and torqued to 18 ft. lb. I remove all of the others, one at a time, brake cleaner and loctite, and install at 18 ft. lbs. Now is also a good time to do the crank seal, check the water pump and idler bearings, and replace the coolant hoses if they have some age on them. Cummins built a great engine except for that dowel pin thing...that was big time stupid !
 

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Discussion Starter #31
It looks right and the pin IS in there. Yours looks just like my 97 did after I drove the pin all the way home. That pin doesn’t need to be any longer. As long as it out well into the aluminum case, it will work. I made my own tab and put it in with a little longer grade 10 bolt. Craig
so that means the case holds it in? Previously we discussed no need for a retention piece.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
That machined aluminum dowel pin tab is a good design. It's the style I use. It flips to fit early and late case designs and, because of the depth of the part, it can't fall out even if the bolt loosens. Use loctite and torque to 18, so it does not loosen. There are a total of 9 bolts inside the cover that need checking. All but one can be removed by rotating the crankshaft. I use a barring tool and a 3 foot extension to rotate the crank. One bolt can't be removed, but can be loosened, brake cleaner, and wicking loctite put on it and torqued to 18 ft. lb. I remove all of the others, one at a time, brake cleaner and loctite, and install at 18 ft. lbs. Now is also a good time to do the crank seal, check the water pump and idler bearings, and replace the coolant hoses if they have some age on them. Cummins built a great engine except for that dowel pin thing...that was big time stupid !
I will keep in mind. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #33
So did I until I inquired directly to them. This is the e-mail I received back. I have 540k on mine.


Thank you for contacting Fluidampr. The recommended 500,000 mile replacement on our OTR dampers is when we have seen the silicone start to breakdown. The larger mass and temp conditions play a large roll in this. Fluidampr dampers do not have a number on “the life of the engine” due to many factors, which can include an improperly maintained engine that may not last nearly as long as a properly maintained engine. We have many dampers in the field exceeding high mileage. With a properly maintained engine, we have never had a Fluidampr performance damper fail. The mileage you stated I recommend you inspect the damper and proceed as normal.

Viscous dampers can be inspected for bulging in the cover (this can be done visually or if possible to access the damper using a straight edge to ensure there is no bulging of the cover on the welded side of the damper that faces out when installed), also check for any damage to the housing that could cause the internal inertia ring to not move freely. If no signs of damage are present there is no cause for concern. You can of course replace it if you would feel more comfortable. We do offer a trade in program, you would send us your old damper and we would replace it with a new damper at a reduced cost plus shipping and tax where applicable.
Interesting. Sounds like they basically do though :)
 

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That machined aluminum dowel pin tab is a good design. It's the style I use. It flips to fit early and late case designs..........
Since the late case is designed to contain the pin I'm guessing it is a suspenders and belt approach?
 

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Since the late case is designed to contain the pin I'm guessing it is a suspenders and belt approach?
First gens had a different cover, looks close to the updated 98+ cover.
 

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First gens had a different cover, looks close to the updated 98+ cover.
I see. I'm still in the cut a tab out of any piece of metal and save your money camp.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Lol but I need to be 100% sure i don’t need to retain it with a piece of metal. Correct?
It hasn’t moved in 250k doubt it will.
 

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A little history. The dowel pin problem was recognized in the 90s. Dodge (who had to do the warranty work, not Cummins) refused to do a recall. Although not prevalent, it happened often enough that the word got around. To my knowledge the Cummins Forum did not exist at that time but the Turbo Diesel Register did and I was (and still am) a member. Case bolts coming out weren't a recognized problem at the time so jigs were fabricated that positioned a drill to bore a hole above the dowel pin followed by a self threading bolt that effectively kept the dowel pin from coming out. The jigs were mailed to other members who used them and passed them on to other members. One obvious problem there was was that the truck owner had no idea if his pin had come out with no damage or not. Another TDR member who lived in a close by town and I killed our pins by removing the gear case cover and installing tabs made from washers. Somewhere in the late 90s, maybe after Y2K, Cummins changed the design of the case to the type you have. They were still making 12 valve engines for applications other than Dodge pickups.

Like I already said, you have a dowel pin. Try to insert it into the hole. If it won't go in (and I'm sure it won't) the one in the block can't come out. The new case was designed for that purpose.
 

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I pulled the cover on mine after 437k miles. The KDP hadn’t budged.

915155


You’ll have to get a feel for how deep the hole is and how long the pin is. I can’t say if it’s driven way in or not
 
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