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Anyone have a link or steps on removing the front brake rotors to replace them? I tried them last weekend by removing the wheels and getting an extension trying to pop off the alen on the inside with no luck. I used a blow torch and a 3lb sledge trying to knock em loose but still didn't have any luck.. anyone with any advice I'd appreciate it. Thank you (94 12 valve with 4wd) just doing the front rotors and pads
 

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Welcome. OK. You have the same brakes as my 99. The studs are pressed through the hub into the rotor. They must be pounded out or pressed out. If you just pound them out with a hammer you will swell them up and often the lug nuts will not not fit and strip because of the swelling. If you can pound them out with brass or copper(soft metal) the studs will last longer and you can use them at least a couple of times. Or you can just buy new studs at the parts house in Dorman. They are 5-7 dollars each in most parts houses. half that at Rock auto but you will have to match size closely, not sure they have yours. A press is best. I have used a 3/4 brass drift pin from harbor Freight and a piece of tubing slide over it to hold onto it, and a big hammer hitting it hard. Put back together the same way or get a 9/16 by 18 thread hard High Nut and a couple of flat washers and some grease for threads and washers. Then suck them in with an impact wrench. I use the Harbor 49 dollar 1/2 in drive 110v electric wrench. That works a lot better than pounding for re-installation. Some new hub and bearing kits come with new studs. Let me know if you need further instruction. Called lug stud or wheel stud.
 
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Welcome. OK. You have the same brakes as my 99. The studs are pressed through the hub into the rotor. They must be pounded out or pressed out. If you just pound them out with a hammer you will swell them up and often the lug nuts will not not fit and strip because of the swelling. If you can pound them out with brass or copper(soft metal) the studs will last longer and you can use them at least a couple of times. Or you can just buy new studs at the parts house in Dorman. They are 5-7 dollars each in most parts houses. half that at Rock auto but you will have to match size closely, not sure they have yours. A press is best. I have used a 3/4 brass drift pin from harbor Freight and a piece of tubing slide over it to hold onto it, and a big hammer hitting it hard. Put back together the same way or get a 9/16 by 18 thread hard High Nut and a couple of flat washers and some grease for threads and washers. Then suck them in with an impact wrench. I use the Harbor 49 dollar 1/2 in drive 110v electric wrench. That works a lot better than pounding for re-installation. Some new hub and bearing kits come with new studs. Let me know if you need further instruction. Called lug stud or wheel stud.
How does this in any way shape or form help the OP get the BRAKE ROTORS off his truck?
 

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He has to take off the four bolts holding on the hub and bearing assembly first and then replace the rotor on it and then reinstall the whole assembly
 

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Some parts stores have a hub, beariing and rotor allassembledas one piece for a reasonable price. I thnink it was O'Reily's or Autozone, That is easy but costs a bit more and harder to find, but I have seen them.
 

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These are an extremely poor design, with unit bearings pressed into the rotors. The issue is that you have rust holding it together, not allowing you to pull the whole thing out. Some people have had luck using the power steering for leverage. To do that, you back off one of the 4 bolts on the rear of the hub, then put a socket on it. While a helper watches for the socket to make contact with the knuckle, you slowly turn the wheel to press it out. I've always just used a big F*****G hammer.
 

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^ And if its stuck enough, people wreck their steering box with that 'trick'.

See if you can find a junk 8-lug rotor to bolt on over top (backwards), and use that as something to beat against with a hammer. MFR's should be shot for not using anti-seize compound.
 

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I used a combination of a lot of spray lube , a map gas torch, and a sledge hammer to get mine off, but I was replacing the unit bearing and rotors at the time , so all teh old was was going in the trash anyhow.
It'd be a challenge to remove everything and keep it re-usable condition.
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^ And if its stuck enough, people wreck their steering box with that 'trick'.

See if you can find a junk 8-lug rotor to bolt on over top (backwards), and use that as something to beat against with a hammer. MFR's should be shot for not using anti-seize compound.
Your not going to wreck the steering box doing that.

Beating on it kinda hammers the bearing pretty bad.... i usually leave the axle nut on to hold the bearing together while i pop it off then bolt it back on and push the axle out of the hub...


I never replaced the rotor and not changed the wheel bearings in the same swing
 

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Co-worker did, on his 3rdgen, with that procedure. That's why I'm saying it.
Never owned or worked on a 3rd gen so I cant really respond to that. Im guessing that truck had something wrong, on its way out...

Turning tires on dry pavement while stationary is a lot of stress, probably more than the wheel bearings press "trick".


Ive done it a million times on rusty crap boxes with no issues...
 

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If your going to save the unit bearing , take it to a shop with a press for the wheel studs out , then in . No use beating on or around a unit bearing your going to save.

The press back in is tight , i used the impact , washers and spare lug nuts ( several ) I got it done , but it wasnt fun nor pretty . Press would be waaaay better .

Good luck , its a suck azzzzz job.
 

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^ And if its stuck enough, people wreck their steering box with that 'trick'.
Never heard of a single instance of that.
 

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Co-worker did, on his 3rdgen, with that procedure. That's why I'm saying it.
The 3rd gen doesn't even have unit bearings.
 

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The 3rd gen doesn't even have unit bearings.
Um, Yeah they do (well at least the 4x4's do, not sure about 2wd, never played with one of those).

Here's a screen shot of just some of the unit bearing offerings for a 2005 Ram 2500 (right in the middle of the 3rd gen 5.9 common rail years) at Rock Auto

Rectangle Font Parallel Screenshot Software
 

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The 3rd gen doesn't even have unit bearings.
Nice try. I just bolted a pair of factory 3rdgen unit bearings back onto a 3rdgen axle housing.
 

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Nice try. I just bolted a pair of factory 3rdgen unit bearings back onto a 3rdgen axle housing.
I meant "pressed in" unit bearings, which is the whole problem with this design.
 

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The unit bearing in second gens are held in the same way as the unit bearing are in third gens.

Is the bore tolerance suppose to be looser on a third gen or something?
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2ndgen and 3rdgen unit bearings mount the same. (Get stuck in the knuckle).

The only major difference is early 2ndgen has the rotor captive on the backside.
 
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