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So I have a 1200 total mile trip coming up, 400 miles to get to beginning of trek, 400-ish miles of overlanding, and 400 miles to get home. I keep leaning towards my 2000 2500 4WD as the vehicle to take, and wondering if any of you had done something similar. The trek is going to be through and around Death Valley, with elevations ranging from about 280 feet below sea level to about 6,000 ft above. This will be my first experience with a multi-day overlanding adventure, although I have been camping/off-roading most of my life. My truck is pretty stock, 212k, with full set of gauges, built 47RE, factory limited slip, camper package, and new 32' BFG All-Terrains. I think the truck should be able to handle the trip, but am a little concerned about shaking the poor thing apart. I will probably air down to 30-ish PSI on the trails/washboard roads, and will run standard pressure on the asphalt portions.

Besides basic tools, spare fuel filters (just changed filter yesterday), spare fluids although the truck doesn't consume/leak any, etc...is there anything else any of you would recommend to take on the trip, or any extra recommended preparations? I have spent the last month or so going over the truck pretty well, and I have addressed what I could find (completely rebuilt driver's seat with Geno's garage parts, got transmission temp gauge working again, installed new tires, checked brakes, rebuilt front-end, etc. I think I should be good to go, but seeking advice on anything I may have missed.

I do also have a 2005 Wrangler Rubicon with six speed manual and 89k miles, but I just think I'll enjoy the extra room and fuel capacity (the Ram has a 30 gallon aux tank/toolbox combo in bed) that the Ram has to offer, plus there is just something about cruising down a desolate dirt road/trail and listening to the Cummins. Any feedback would be appreciated, thanks!
 

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If you also have a Jeep Rubicon at your disposal,,,, just take that instead.

Being heavy is rarely a good thing off-road, and the front of diesel trucks are heavy. Tire cuts/ punctures happen a lot easier when there is thousands of more pounds pushing those tires into the sharp rocks.

It may be more of an adventure in the Dodge, with more stories to tell about overcoming a bad situation while sitting around the campfire, but the Jeep Rubicon is undoubtedly a better off-roader.
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You can do it as long as you go slow and carefully. I just take my Rubicon for any off-roading, but I know many who have lifted trucks and do just fine. They do have to go slower and not bash through stuff like some of the Jeep guys do. You will enjoy the space but I have seen many trucks with busted axles and joints sitting around.
 

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You will have no problem whatsoever. Well.... maybe. If you have a 4 door long bed or similar real long wheelbase truck, that long wheelbase will limit you. I have a single cab and can go most any place I want. I have been down some pretty nasty roads and the truck handled them very well. There are a few roads (Lipponcot trail) that will limit you because of your (our) size, but they represent a very small percentage of the roads in DV. I have been there many times in my truck and have always been happy with it. I assume you have a good continuous duty compressor for your tires. You will need one. Yes, air down, it makes a HUGE difference. The rocks are very sharp, don't speed. Your tires are fine, I have used BFG's no problem. What kind of camper or shell do you have? By far, I prefer the extra space of the truck over a Rubicon Jeep. As well you don't have to listen to everything rattle since everything is in the bed. I am not a fan of large overhead campers, too much weight and bulk and that will limit you. Personally, I do not think you need spare filters. All fuel is clean we are not in India, and unless you rip a filter off, you will not need anything. Same with fluids, you dump oil, trans fluid, diff oil or anything else, you will have bigger problems to deal with. Take a quart of oil. Take water, lots if it. For tools, a good jack, a complete set of recovery gear, solid tool kit, but nothing special is fine. You will not be rebuilding your engine out there, no need to bring a ton of tools. Bring a good medical kit, that can be important. If you are doing 400 miles on dirt ( am jealous), you will want a 5 gallon diesel jerry can. Getting fresh ice will be your biggest problem. I live about 400 miles from DV, I know exactly what you are doing and what you are up against. Have fun, be careful, don't burn desert wood, bring your own. I would like to hear how it goes. We plan on going shortly.
 
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don't burn desert wood, bring your own
Curious about the reasoning behind this? I've always understood to never transport firewood very far, to avoid bringing non-native insects with you.
 
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