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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey y’all,
Im new to the forum, but not new to Cummins. I had a ‘99 24V ten years ago, but had to let it go.
I’m looking at a truck right now (specs in title) to use for my dump trailer business. Towing capacity says 10k.
My trailer will be about 4,800 lbs empty. Plan on setting 2 ton limits for customers. My only concern is the truck being a 4 speed auto, is it fit for hauling every day? Does anyone on here have any experience frequently towing with this motor/transmission?
Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: here’s the link to what I’m trying to buy
 

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How many miles on the truck you’re looking at? What is the history? What is the rear end ratio? Use plans (lots of interstate driving? All surface streets?).

Chances are you’ll be looking at an AT rebuild sooner or later. At that point you can add strengthened parts that address points of weakness. Might want to proactively install some upgrades to it as is, including a lockup switch, etc.

You’re trading slipping clutches for AT issues. Pick your poison.
 

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Towing capacity says 10k.
That is the rating of the hitch receiver. It is also limited to 500 pounds hitch weight without a weight distribution hitch and 1000 with one. 9000 pounds of trailer/contents would be in the neighborhood of 900 pounds tongue weight which would obviously require a W/D. I've never seen a bumper pull dump trailer that had the capability of installing a W/C hitch. Does yours? I wish I had taken a picture of mine when I overloaded it with a trailer from Ft. Worth to Seattle. The frame backets' metal literally tore. I've since installed a Curt XD. Without a W/D it is rated for 2400 pounds tongue weight. https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Hi...MIg6qKkZqn9AIVA-iGCh1-UQ2tEAQYASABEgK_5PD_BwE

If by chance your trailer is a gooseneck you can ignore all that. Your weight limitation is only governed by your registration, class of drivers license and the strength of the drivetrailn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is the rating of the hitch receiver. It is also limited to 500 pounds hitch weight without a weight distribution hitch and 1000 with one. 9000 pounds of trailer/contents would be in the neighborhood of 900 pounds tongue weight which would obviously require a W/D. I've never seen a bumper pull dump trailer that had the capability of installing a W/C hitch. Does yours? I wish I had taken a picture of mine when I overloaded it with a trailer from Ft. Worth to Seattle. The frame backets' metal literally tore. I've since installed a Curt XD. Without a W/D it is rated for 2400 pounds tongue weight. https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Hitch/Curt/C15325.html?feed=npn&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Google | Shop - Trailer Hitch&adgroupid=97971554286&campaignid=918096360&creative=425399719657&device=c&devicemodel=&feeditemid=&keyword=&loc_interest_ms=&loc_physical_ms=9027421&matchtype=&network=g&placement=&position=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIg6qKkZqn9AIVA-iGCh1-UQ2tEAQYASABEgK_5PD_BwE

If by chance your trailer is a gooseneck you can ignore all that. Your weight limitation is only governed by your registration, class of drivers license and the strength of the drivetrailn.
In all honesty I was planning on going gooseneck anyway
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How many miles on the truck you’re looking at? What is the history? What is the rear end ratio? Use plans (lots of interstate driving? All surface streets?).

Chances are you’ll be looking at an AT rebuild sooner or later. At that point you can add strengthened parts that address points of weakness. Might want to proactively install some upgrades to it as is, including a lockup switch, etc.

You’re trading slipping clutches for AT issues. Pick your poison.
Little under 98k miles. Dealership said it was owned by an old man who used it as a farm truck. Got transferred into his family but no one wanted it. It will probably see a good mix or interstate and inner city driving
 

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It’s also approximately the manufacturer’s rating.
It is the manufacture's rating because it is the max rating of the receiver. The manufacturer's tow rating for 5th wheels and goosenecks is higher.
 

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Hey y’all,
Im new to the forum, but not new to Cummins. I had a ‘99 24V ten years ago, but had to let it go.
I’m looking at a truck right now (specs in title) to use for my dump trailer business. Towing capacity says 10k.
My trailer will be about 4,800 lbs empty. Plan on setting 2 ton limits for customers. My only concern is the truck being a 4 speed auto, is it fit for hauling every day? Does anyone on here have any experience frequently towing with this motor/transmission?
Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: here’s the link to what I’m trying to buy
Hi!!!!!!!! Absolutely NOT! The auto that comes in that truck is a good transmission, but not for what you want to use it for. #1, 4 gears that don't fit with towing heavy weight often. 2 1/2 first gear and 2 to1 reverse not intended for getting heavy weight moving from a complete stop. Try that on a hill and the truck may not even move. #2, trans will get hot and cook the oil, even with coolers, lock up converters etc. #3, very expensive to upgrade the trans to survive and when done you still have the heat and gearing issues. #4, slowing the truck and trailer down. The auto that comes in the earlier trucks don't do well in that area either. The Aisin 6 speed auto is fantastic at slowing truck and trailer down.
Go with at least a NV4500 or larger manual trans. Low gears, no overheating, strong and reliable. Diesels like 5 gears min, 6 would be better. 8 to 10 gears, not necessary.
The correct manual trans is MUCH cheaper and MUCH more reliable.
 

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#1, 4 gears that don't fit with towing heavy weight often. 2 1/2 first gear and 2 to1 reverse not intended for getting heavy weight moving from a complete stop. Try that on a hill and the truck may not even move. #2, trans will get hot and cook the oil, even with coolers, lock up converters etc. #3, very expensive to upgrade the trans to survive and when done you still have the heat and gearing issues. #4, slowing the truck and trailer down. The auto that comes in the earlier trucks don't do well in that area either. The Aisin 6 speed auto is fantastic at slowing truck and trailer down.
Go with at least a NV4500 or larger manual trans. Low gears, no overheating, strong and reliable. Diesels like 5 gears min, 6 would be better. 8 to 10 gears, not necessary.
The correct manual trans is MUCH cheaper and MUCH more reliable.
I'll let others comment on #1,2 and 3. #4, ever heard of a lockup torque converter and exhaust brakes? That's the difference between the old Dodges and the new Rams when it comes to slowing down. As an FYI, both can be added to the old Dodge.

You obviously haven't priced manual transmissions, clutch/pressure plate sets, clutch linkage and pedal sets. The NV4500 is NOT more reliable than a built automatic. I doubt the conversion is cheaper as well.
 

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I'll let others comment on #1,2 and 3. #4, ever heard of a lockup torque converter and exhaust brakes? That's the difference between the old Dodges and the new Rams when it comes to slowing down. As an FYI, both can be added to the old Dodge.

You obviously haven't priced manual transmissions, clutch/pressure plate sets, clutch linkage and pedal sets. The NV4500 is NOT more reliable than a built automatic. I doubt the conversion is cheaper as well.
Even with a lockup torque converter there is still a lot of heat produced. Yes, the new exhaust brakes were very well but the post was about a second gen auto that does not have one. No add on ones work like the newer ones that come on the truck and are in the turbo. The gearing is a BIG problem on the 47RE's and that can not be changed. I have priced manual transmissions and conversions. I have both. Manual is much cheaper.

The question here was about buying an older truck with an auto. I recommend a manual for ALL the reasons I listed as I have owned both.
 

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Yes, the new exhaust brakes were very well but the post was about a second gen auto that does not have one. No add on ones work like the newer ones that come on the truck and are in the turbo.
No, not stock, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to make a 2nd gen tq converter lock up. I suggest you actually research before you type. Considering they work exactly the same (block exhaust gasses), that's a statement you need to prove to me. I've taken some pretty big trailers down some pretty steep hills with just the EB holding me back.

You have converted an automatic to a manual transmission so you know how much it costs? Sure you have.
 

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No, not stock, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to make a 2nd gen tq converter lock up. I suggest you actually research before you type. Considering they work exactly the same (block exhaust gasses), that's a statement you need to prove to me. I've taken some pretty big trailers down some pretty steep hills with just the EB holding me back.

You have converted an automatic to a manual transmission so you know how much it costs? Sure you have.
I think my personal experience counts as research. All torque converters make heat, some more than others. Manual transmissions don't create very much heat, much simpler and more reliable. Yes the exhaust brakes do work, but not as well as the newer more complicated ones.
I do know the conversion costs, $2,200 for brand new NV4500, $300. for Advanced Adapters bellhousing, $300. for the NOS clutch, pedals, flywheel etc. All under $3,500. More reliable, no extra heat issues, less expense, less maintenance and much lower gearing to get heavy weight moving from a stop. Correct gearing is very important. Those Dodge autos you seem to be in love with are no match for a good manual, or an Aisin auto.
 

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I think my personal experience counts as research. All torque converters make heat, some more than others. Manual transmissions don't create very much heat, much simpler and more reliable. Yes the exhaust brakes do work, but not as well as the newer more complicated ones.
I do know the conversion costs, $2,200 for brand new NV4500, $300. for Advanced Adapters bellhousing, $300. for the NOS clutch, pedals, flywheel etc. All under $3,500. More reliable, no extra heat issues, less expense, less maintenance and much lower gearing to get heavy weight moving from a stop. Correct gearing is very important. Those Dodge autos you seem to be in love with are no match for a good manual, or an Aisin auto.
I guess you have never seen a manual transmission with a temp gauge. They get very hot when towing, in fact it is the heat that destroys transmissions. I'd love to see the data that states the new EBs outperform the ones for 12 valves. Just because you say they are better means nothing.

You might find a rebuilt (not brand new) NV4500 for $2200, but a clutch, pedals, fly wheel for $300? Not in your wildest dreams. Clutch linkage alone is $362.54 I forgot the driveshaft mod in my list. I could dig through my recipts but I won't take the time. It sure wasn't free.

I'm not in love with the auto at all, in fact I would never buy one. Of course they can't match the Aison. Neither can the G56. Ram derates the engines in front of the manual transmissions now just like Dodge derated the engines in front of automatics in the '90s. However, if I did own an automatic I know it could be beefed up considerably, unlike the NV4500 that can't be beefed up at all where it needs to be.
 

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I guess you have never seen a manual transmission with a temp gauge. They get very hot when towing, in fact it is the heat that destroys transmissions. I'd love to see the data that states the new EBs outperform the ones for 12 valves. Just because you say they are better means nothing.

You might find a rebuilt (not brand new) NV4500 for $2200, but a clutch, pedals, fly wheel for $300? Not in your wildest dreams. Clutch linkage alone is $362.54 I forgot the driveshaft mod in my list. I could dig through my recipts but I won't take the time. It sure wasn't free.

I'm not in love with the auto at all, in fact I would never buy one. Of course they can't match the Aison. Neither can the G56. Ram derates the engines in front of the manual transmissions now just like Dodge derated the engines in front of automatics in the '90s. However, if I did own an automatic I know it could be beefed up considerably, unlike the NV4500 that can't be beefed up at all where it needs to be.
Don't forget to mention the GEARING, 2.5 first and 2.0 reverse are not made for getting heavy weight moving from a stop. So on top of all the heat and $$$$ that is something that can't be resolved with the early auto's. Again, manual setup less than $3,500. And yes, $2,200. NV4500 shipped.
All the information I have provided are FACT'S not opinions.
 

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Don't forget to mention the GEARING, 2.5 first and 2.0 reverse are not made for getting heavy weight moving from a stop. So on top of all the heat and $$$$ that is something that can't be resolved with the early auto's. Again, manual setup less than $3,500. And yes, $2,200. NV4500 shipped.
All the information I have provided are FACT'S not opinions.
I guess you have never heard of torque multiflication. "The main characteristic of a torque converter is its ability to increase torque when the output rotational speed is so low that it allows the fluid coming off the curved vanes of the turbine to be deflected off the stator while it is locked against its one-way clutch, thus providing the equivalent of a reduction gear. This is a feature beyond that of the simple fluid coupling, which can match rotational speed but does not multiply torque and thus reduces power."

It's pretty obvious you have never owned a NV4500 and used it commercially. I went through 12 of them.

I dug up my G56 conversion receipts from almost 12 years ago. Driveshaft modification was $250 and I only have one. Flywheel, clutch and pressure plate kit was nearly a thousand.

Send me the link for a $2200 HD NV4500, shipped, no core charge. You do know there are light duty versions that were used by GM and in Dodge 1500s don't you? While you are at it, a link to that flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, pilot bearing, release bearing, pedal kit for $300.
 

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I guess you have never heard of torque multiflication. "The main characteristic of a torque converter is its ability to increase torque when the output rotational speed is so low that it allows the fluid coming off the curved vanes of the turbine to be deflected off the stator while it is locked against its one-way clutch, thus providing the equivalent of a reduction gear. This is a feature beyond that of the simple fluid coupling, which can match rotational speed but does not multiply torque and thus reduces power."

It's pretty obvious you have never owned a NV4500 and used it commercially. I went through 12 of them.

I dug up my G56 conversion receipts from almost 12 years ago. Driveshaft modification was $250 and I only have one. Flywheel, clutch and pressure plate kit was nearly a thousand.

Send me the link for a $2200 HD NV4500, shipped, no core charge. You do know there are light duty versions that were used by GM and in Dodge 1500s don't you? While you are at it, a link to that flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, pilot bearing, release bearing, pedal kit for $300.
Without lower gears the torque converter can only do so much. Enough weight and incline and no movement. All my parts were less than $3,500. Trans was brand new in Crysler box. A good manual is more reliable, simpler and cheaper. All FACTS.
 
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