Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum - Reply to Topic
98.5-02 24V P-Pump Conversion Discussion of converting 24V trucks from the VP44 stock pump to a P-Pump powered 24V No Advertising ...NO ADVERTISING

Thread: Hauling 34,500 with an f350 p24v Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-16-2019 08:47 AM
GAmes
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monstermaker View Post
I run heavy trucks for a living, and have for three decades.
I’m not sure how qualified you are, but it sounds like you need to study some DOT regs.
Too lazy to look up the DMV site? Registration of a vehicle for weight doesn't have anything to do with the driver's license requirements. But since you need some help, here ya go. This is YOUR STATE and the states on both sides of you. Feel free to look up any of the other 47 states to find one that has different requirements. You aren't the first commercial driver who has posted bogus information. Is it true what they say about truck drivers?

https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/cdlrequired.html

Types of vehicles that require a CDL
You must have a commercial driver license (CDL) to drive any of the following vehicles:

All single vehicles with a manufacturer's weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more.
All trailers with a manufacturer's weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more, and a combined vehicles' gross weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more.

All vehicles designed to transport 16 or more persons (including the driver). This includes private and church buses.
All school buses, regardless of size.
All vehicles used to transport any material that requires hazardous material placarding or any quantity of a material listed as a select agent or toxin in 42 CFR 73.


Types of vehicles that can be driven with each class of CDL
(Commercial vehicles are divided into 3 size classes: A, B, and C)
CDL class What you can drive
A
A combination vehicle with gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, as long as the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is over 10,000 pounds. Washington State doesn't recognize class A passenger vehicles.
B
Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more.
Vehicles towing a trailer with a weight rating of 10,000 (GVWR) pounds or less.
Any vehicles listed under Class C, if properly endorsed.
C
Vehicles carrying 16 or more persons including the driver.*
Vehicles carrying hazardous materials that need a placard.*

OREGON

https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/Page...ID/CDLget.aspx

You must have a CDL if you operate:

Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating or actual gross vehicle weight, whichever is greater, of 26,001 pounds or more;
A trailer, or multiple trailers, with a total gross vehicle weight rating or actual gross vehicle weight of more than 10,000 pounds when the gross combination weight rating or actual gross combination weight, whichever is greater, of all vehicles combined is 26,001 pounds or more;
A vehicle that transports 16 or more passengers (including the driver); or
Any size vehicle that is used in the transportation of any material that requires hazardous materials placards or any amount of a material listed as a select agent or toxin in 42 CFR, Part 73.

https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Forms/DMV/36.pdf

1.1.1 – License classifications
Remember, along with the license class, you must also obtain the
proper endorsements to be eligible to operate specific types of
commercial vehicles. For example, a Class A CDL does not allow
you to pull double and triple trailers unless you have a double and
triple trailer endorsement (see section 1.2).
• A Class A CDL authorizes a person to operate any vehicle or
combination of vehicles except that the person may not operate
any vehicle for which an endorsement is required unless the
person obtains the endorsement.
• A Class B CDL authorizes a person to operate any single
vehicle regardless of weight. You may tow a trailer if the
trailer’s GVWR or GVW, whichever is greater, does not
exceed 10,000 pounds. If the trailer you are towing has a
GVWR or GVW, whichever is greater, of more than 10,000
pounds, and the GCWR or GCW, whichever is greater, of all
vehicles combined is more than 26,000 pounds, you will need
a Class A CDL.
The person may not operate any vehicle for
which an endorsement is required unless the person obtains
the endorsement.

IDAHO

https://itd.idaho.gov/itddmv/

Who Must Obtain a CDL
Idaho’s Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Program is designed to improve safety on our highways while meeting federal requirements for testing and licensing of all commercial drivers. You must have a CDL to operate any of the following commercial motor vehicles (CMV):

Combination vehicle with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, provided that the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the towed unit is greater than 10,000 pounds
Single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds

Vehicle designed to transport 16 or more persons (including the driver)
Any size vehicle that requires hazardous material placards
Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is the manufacturer’s assigned weight rating for the vehicle (truck, bus, or trailer), not the vehicle registered weight. On trucks, the GVWR is usually found on a plate or sticker inside the driver’s door. On trailers, it may be found anywhere but is commonly found on the front of the trailer on the trailer tongue or frame. For Idaho, in the absence of a GVWR, the actual weight of the vehicle plus its heaviest load is considered to be the GVWR. The sum of the GVWR of the tires can also be used to determine approximate GVWR. Other states may use other definitions.

Gross combined weight rating (GCWR), is figured by adding the GVWR of each unit of a combination vehicle.

CDL License Classes

There are three classes of commercial driver’s licenses: Class A, B and C. Drivers of vehicles that do not fall in Classes A, B, or C will be issued Class D (non-commercial) licenses.

Class A – Combination vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is greater than 10,000 pounds. Drivers with a Class A license may, with the proper endorsements, operate vehicles requiring a Class B, C or D license.

Class B – Single vehicles with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle 10,000 pounds GVWR or less. A driver with a Class B license may, with the proper endorsements, operate vehicles requiring a Class C or D license.

Class C – Vehicles with a GVWR or GCWR less than 26,001 pounds. Class C is strictly for vehicles designed to carry 16 or more people (including the driver), or carrying hazardous materials requiring the vehicle to display placards. A driver with a Class C license may also operate vehicles requiring a Class D license.
07-15-2019 10:13 PM
Monstermaker I run heavy trucks for a living, and have for three decades.
Iím not sure how qualified you are, but it sounds like you need to study some DOT regs.
06-30-2019 08:38 PM
GAmes
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monstermaker View Post
Well if you really wanna get technical, itís not the gross weight rating of the truck and trailer itís the amount of weight registration you license it for. (AND actual scale weight).
You can under-register a heavier duty truck and as long as you do keep it under 26,000 youíre OK.
Totally wrong. Take the same amount of time it took you to post that nonsense and pull up the DMV website of your state, or any other state. CDL requirements are the same nation wide.
06-30-2019 08:26 PM
Monstermaker Well if you really wanna get technical, it’s not the gross weight rating of the truck and trailer it’s the amount of weight registration you license it for. (AND actual scale weight).
You can under-register a heavier duty truck and as long as you do keep it under 26,000 you’re OK.

This is why the tow ratings war between Ford and Ram is kinda’ silly. I read somewhere Chevy chose not to do battle with them, not because they can’t, but because like 0.0002% of pickup truck buyers are pulling 30,000 pound trailers, and you need a CDL to pull a trailer over 18,000 - 20,000-ish anyway.
06-30-2019 05:19 PM
GAmes
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monstermaker View Post
Iíll assume you know youíve gotta carry a CDL when your gross is over 26,000.
Not exactly. It is the gross combined weight rating of truck and trailer that dictates the type of driver's license you need. So in fact, the actual gross weight could be well under 26,000 and the driver would still need a class A.
06-30-2019 05:03 PM
Monstermaker Iíll assume you know youíve gotta carry a CDL when your gross is over 26,000.
Around here theyíve been really cracking down on that stuff.

You should be tuning that engine for as little power as possible. Youíre badly over stressing your trans, u-joints, rear end, etc.
Youll notice when you buy an F550 it comes with a de-rated engine compared to the F350 and F450, for that reason.
06-30-2019 01:44 PM
GAmes
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kodiak2063 View Post
Does anyone have any experience hauling loads with the nv4500 in 5th gear? I was doing a lot of reading and it seems like a split decision between "dont do it" and "its ok on a flat road with no lugging under 1500 rpms"
I do, pulling trailers much lighter than you have. Most of the RVs I pulled were in the 10,000 pound range, some bumped 14,000, but not many. I went through 12 NV4500s in 730,000 miles, most of which failed because I towed in 5th. Limiting boost to 20 psi slowed the carnage. I installed a G56 about 600,000 miles ago. Hauling the same types of trailers I have only had to remove it for minor repair one time. Totally puzzled about the "lugging under 1500 rpm advice. There isn't much tq developed by the engine at that low rpm. There is speculation, without any verification, that low rpm operation in 5th causes the 5th gear retaining nut to back off. It has nothing to do with failure, you just have a 4 speed. And when it fails more than likely it will be catastrophic, as in a pile of broken gears and bearings laying in the bottom of the case.
06-29-2019 04:07 PM
9297oldram Keep it on the level roads and watch for the temps to rise when it's hot out. A 1 ton truck isn't really built for that much towing weight.
06-12-2019 07:31 PM
Kodiak2063 Haha yes "Monster up top" perfectly describes how it was set up

The pump was a 180 pump with an 8 plate ground to a 100 profile, .93 lines and crossover tubes. It had full cut dvs in it but i put in some cpp hot street delivery valves in. With the full cuts I had what i think may have been pre detontation rattle in higher rpms, the cpp hot street valves made it run so much better and got rid of the high rpm rattle. The star wheel was turned in so far i had to reach up under the plug after i took it off with a 90 degree pick to turn it back to where i could see it, turned it out about 30 clicks, runs way better and i can hit 40 psi boost, which is what it seems like the wastegate must be set at, fairly easy now. Never even saw over 30 psi when the truck was set up for full fuel. Lol

I think youre right that that kind of weight is too much for the truck and things will likely break, hopefully i wont have to use it too long as the tow rig. We did decide to swap in some 4.10 gears and detroit truetrac for the rear. After a few bid runs on jobs, it was pretty clear we needed lower gears just for the crazy hills and technical back woods road driving we're gonna be doing.

Thanks for the replies so far! Does anyone have any experience hauling loads with the nv4500 in 5th gear? I was doing a lot of reading and it seems like a split decision between "dont do it" and "its ok on a flat road with no lugging under 1500 rpms"
06-12-2019 01:19 AM
marco610 You can setup the Cummins to deal with that kind of weight but's the only thing built hd enough for that kind task imo. Nv4500 wont like it either, heat will kill it eventually.
I use to tow 10~20k with a 94 f350 (4.10's) and it got sketchy. It was a good truck but you could feel it wasn't up to the task. Eventually retired it after the rear end blew up.
06-07-2019 12:18 PM
sven You need to figure out what size pump it is, what fuel plate ect. so the guys can help with tuning info. maybe also look into the afc live?
06-07-2019 11:54 AM
Killjoy That's some tall gearing.... roll out of it slow that's all I can say. Maybe trying pulling a bit of fuel down low, then let it ramp up hard in the mid range to keep momentum up.
I assume it was set up to be a monster up top?
This thread has more than 12 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome