The Cure For The Common BHAF - Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum
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post #1 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-09-2017, 06:30 AM Thread Starter
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The Cure For The Common BHAF

I have never liked the BHAF. I have an old-style AEM dryflow, and I don't like it either. Having a completely exposed, relatively fragile filter stuffed under the hood sucking in hot air has just never seemed like a good idea. On top of that, the filter is susceptible to water splashing, and the setup is useless for a truck like mine that may have to endure the occasional water crossing. About the only positive aspect of the BHAF is they offer good breathing on the cheap.

I've been shopping around for a while for a filter housing assembly to replace my quasi-BHAF AEM filter. After considering the conflicting requirements of overall size, restriction, inlet/outlet size and position, availability of high efficiency filter media, and cost, I finally settled on the Donaldson 9" FPG Alexin™.

Just for a baseline, here's the specs on the Donaldson B105006 BHAF (aka WIX 42790, NAPA 2790):

Outlet Diameter: 4.02 Inches (102 MM)
Body Diameter Max: 10.51 Inches (267MM)
Body Length: 10.51 Inches (267 MM)
Efficiency: 99.9 Percent
Efficiency Test Std: ISO 5011
Rated Flow LR: 448 CFM (12.7 CMM)
Rated Flow MR: 590 CFM (16.7 CMM)
Rated Flow HR: 678 CFM (19.2 CMM)
Restriction LR: 4.02 In H2O (102 MM H2O)
Restriction MR: 5.98 In H2O (152 MM H2O)
Restriction HR: 7.99 In H2O (203 MM H2O)
Family: ECB
Type: Primary
Style: Round
Brand: DuraLite™
Media Type: Cellulose

Here's what the FPG Alexin™ looks like:



I like that this filter has a round side inlet which makes connection to a snorkel quite easy. It is mounted tangentially to swirl the incoming air and throw most of the dust to the outside where it is discharged through the rubber valve on the lower front. The round outlet is on the rear, while the front twists open for removal of the filter. Here's the exploded view:



The larger filter element is the primary, while the smaller one that goes inside it is a "safety filter" designed to prevent dirt from getting into the engine during servicing. It's a nice idea, but the safety filter adds a LOT of restriction, which I will explain in a moment.

Here's the specs and flow graph for the 9" Alexin:

Outlet Diameter: 4.02 Inches
Body Diameter Max: 9.53 Inches
Body Length: 15.75 Inches
Efficiency: 99.9 Percent (standard filter)
Efficiency: 99.99 Percent (Donaldson Blue filter)
Rated Flow LR: 265 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 300 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 335 CFM (10" H2O)



At first glance it isn't very impressive. 265CFM at 6" H2O and 300CFM at 8" H2O vs 590CFM at 6" and 678CFM at 8" for the BHAF. The 9" Alexin as-delivered flows only about half that of a BHAF. This is where the safety filter I mentioned earlier comes into play. The Alexin, both 9" and 10", come with a safety filter, and the specs given are WITH the safety filter installed. By contrast, the smaller models are available with or without the safety filter, although the safety can be added to any of them. If we look at the 8" FPG and compare the airflow with the safety filter vs without a safety filter, we can get a good idea of how much restriction the safety filter adds:

8" FPG, Primary Filter Only
Rated Flow LR: 205 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 245 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 275 CFM (10" H2O)

8" FPG, Primary And Safety Filter
Rated Flow LR: 165 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 190 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 215 CFM (10" H2O)

A little bit of algebra shows that running the 8" version WITHOUT the safety filter flows 24%, 29%, and 28% at the three restriction levels. This is an average of 27%. If we apply an increase of 27% to the 9" Alexin to account for the removal of the safety filter, we get the following:

Rated Flow LR: 337 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 381 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 425 CFM (10" H2O)

This is considerably better, but still far short of the BHAF. However, I don't think that simple math is valid, mainly because of the ratio of OD vs ID on the 8" filter vs the 9" filter. I think a better method of calculating the restriction of the 9" Alexin vs the BHAF is to compare the area of the actual filter elements. This is pretty simple, although it does require an assumption on the thickness of the pleated media in the BHAF since it isn't listed. For this I will assume the media thickness is the same between the two, which is a fair assumption since I have had both in front of me

So, the 9" Alexin element is 7.32 OD x 15.28" long. This gives a total outer area of 351 in2. The BHAF has an element OD of 10.51" and a length of 10.51" for a total outer area of 347 in2. On other words, they both have the same outer area, so in theory should flow equally. In reality, the inlet of the Alexin is a restriction that gives it a disdvantage. A little Dremel tool work would remove said restriction, although it would also reduce the swirl effect that centrifugally separates dirt.

All in all, I think the advantages of the 9" Alexin over the BHAF are worth the tradeoffs for a vehicle that isn't looking for that last fraction of HP on the dyno and sees a lot of off road/dusty use. The filter element is nice and safe inside of a housing, teh housing makes it easy to add a snorkel, and you can run the super-efficient Donaldson Blue filter elements.

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post #2 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-09-2017, 07:04 AM Thread Starter
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So, I already have the 9" FPG Alexin, fully intending to install it once I finish my AC mods and install the new turbo. Well, I was looking around for something completely unrelated when I came across this:









That there is a Donaldson PSD10 air filter assembly with a (now apparently unavailable) Donaldson Blue element installed! It had apparently been dropped and had a piece broken on the outlet, which dropped the price from around $250-$300 to $53.00 SHIPPED! The broken plastic is no big deal - I can use the same Norton super-strong urethane adhesive I've been using on my AC project to repair it. The PSD10 is what I originally wanted, but I wasn't sure it would fit and I didn't like the price, so I settled on the much less expensive Alexin. For $53 shipped I was willing to risk it not fitting, so I clicked on ye auld "Buy" button, and it showed up in due course.

The unit I got is an OEM housing. The difference between it and the aftermarket housings is that this OEM housing came with a 4" outlet, which is not available in the aftermarket housings. Here's a disassembly pic:



Here's the specs and chart:

Width: 10.01 Inches
Height: 14.74 Inches
Body Length: 16.90 Inches
Efficiency: 99.95 Percent (standard filter)
Efficiency: 99.99 Percent (Donaldson Blue filter)
Rated Flow LR: 460 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 539 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 609 CFM (10" H2O)



Again, the flow numbers are less, but again, these units are spec'd with safety filters installed. Remove the safety filter and the numbers bump up to these:

Rated Flow LR: 584 CFM (6" H2O)
Rated Flow MR: 685 CFM (8" H2O)
Rated Flow HR: 773 CFM (10" H2O)

Now the numbers match the BHAF. The difference is the dust holding capacity and the airflow at increasing pressure differential.

This unit is heavy and feels very well built. And it's made in the USA Now all I have to do is see how to fit the sucker under the hood as it is way bulky compared to the Alexin. On the plus side, if I can make it fit I probably won't have to change the filter for 10 years

Last edited by MaxPF; 05-09-2017 at 07:15 AM.
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post #3 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-11-2017, 02:04 AM
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I was going to ask why you picked the Alexin over the PowerCore. I've been considering switching to a PowerCore of one variety or another but I'll wait to see how the UOA results come back from this PDD Dust Bowl.

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post #4 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-11-2017, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
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I was going to ask why you picked the Alexin over the PowerCore. I've been considering switching to a PowerCore of one variety or another but I'll wait to see how the UOA results come back from this PDD Dust Bowl.
As I mentioned, size, cost, and fitment were all factors in the decision. The Alexin is a perfect fit in my truck, and the tangential intake can be pointed directly at the inside of the fender where it is easily attached to an external snorkel. On top of that my engine airflow needs are more modest than yours, and the variable geometry turbo can compensate for increased air cleaner restriction.

For your needs, the PSD is clearly the way to go.. if you can fit it. You probably need a PSD12 for your airflow requirements, and considering how ridiculously large the PSD10 is, I don't know if you can fit a PSD12 under your hood. The PSD10 would probably work for you if you can tolerate the extra restriction. A lot of it depends on your turbo. Keep in mind a dirty filter isn't usually condemned until 25" of water, so you can pull 2.5x the rated airflow of a new filter without crossing that line. That is part of the reason I determined the Alexin would be adequate for my purposes.

Lke I mentioned, if I can fit the PSd I will run it. Otherwise I will stick with the Alexin and sell the PSD.
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post #5 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-11-2017, 01:47 PM
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Id like to see a picture of those installed under the hood...

'02 2500 24V CUMMINS QCLB Auto 4" MBRP Turbo-back exhaust, Crazy Carls Super BHAF, Daniel Stern headlight relay harness, MOPAR OEM sport headlamps. Isspro EV2 fuel pressure, trans temp, boost, & EGT gauge. SpynTec Free Spin kit. Warn Premium Hubs
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post #6 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 07:31 AM Thread Starter
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Id like to see a picture of those installed under the hood...
No installed pics, but I have some fitment pics. First though I will start out with pics comparing the two filter assemblies.

This is the part number for the Alexin:



This is a standard unit used for both OEM and aftermarket. Here's the spec page. Keep in mind that the flow ratings are WITH the "safety filter" installed, and the unit will flow approximately 30% more if the safety filter is deleted. For some reason, no applications are listed on the housing page, but the filter that fits in that housing (P780522) ONLY fits the 9" Alexin. If you go to the filter spec page you will see all the applications that use the 9" FPG Alexin. With the exception of the Volvo ECR235C tracked excavator which uses the Volvo D6E 6-cylinder engine, all the apps listed are 4 cylinder engines. Keep in mind they are designed to load up with a lot of dust before needing replacement, so the filters are relatively oversized compared to a filter used in an on-highway app.

The Powercore PSD filter I got is a Freightliner OEM unit. The Part number is D100137. It is identical to the standard D100029 with the exception of outlet size: the D100029 has a 5" outlet whereas the D100137 has a 4" outlet. Here is the specs for the standard D100029. Keeping in mind that these specs are WITH a safety filter in place, they're quite impressive. Again, no applications are shown for the housing. You have to look up the filter part number to see the applications. You will see the applications include B6.7's, C8.3's, and even a CAT ACERT C13! Yup, the Powercores definitely deliver the goods in a relatively (compared to a radial filter) compact package.

It should be noted that the PSD's are also available in horizontal configurations with different outlet and service access locations. You can find all the standard (non-OEM) configurations on this PDF. On top of that, the PSD 8, 9, and 10's and are available with two different length filter elements. The D100029, D100030, and D100072 have the "short" elements, while the D100031, D100032, and D100068 have the "long" elements. The long elements increase the airflow somewhat as shown on the D100032 spec page. They also obviously hold more dirt before becoming unserviceable. The only drawback is that they make the already long housing another 3" in length, about 21" overall. The bigger PSD12 andPSD14's only come in one size: frickin HUGE! If you want to fit one of these bad boys under the hood, break out the sawzall

One little tip: It seems that OEM PN D100033's are popping up on Ebay. These appear to be gummint surplus for MRAP applications. If you're interested in a vertical configuration PSD10, these come with a safety filter and a Donaldson blue nanofiber filter installed!!!! These units are really nothing more than a D000029 shipped with a nanofiber filter rather than the regular cellulose filter that the D000029 ships with. The only thing they don't come with are the threaded mounting clips, but those are cheap. Also, new surplus P605536 blue nanofiber filter elements for these filters are all over Ebay for cheap, and besides fitting the D100033 housing they will also work in the D100029, D100030, and D100072 housings (all the "short" PSD10 housings). In fact, I'm gonna score myself a couple. That should last me 10-15 years

Anyway, back to the main subject. Here's some pics of the Alexin disassembled:



Looking into the inlet. The inlet is out of round because it was stuffed into a box improperly. It straightens right up with a hose clamp



You will note that the filter element isn't visible. The air hits that barrier and is forced to travel in a spiral to throw all the large dust to the outside, where it makes it's way to the vacuator valve and is discharged due to action from intake pulsations. It's a pretty cool setup really. I should note that the housing can be mounted in a variety of orientations with one caveat: the vacuator must be at the lowest point.

Here's a look down into the outet. What you are seeing is the inside of the safety filter.



Access cover removed. This is the primary filter. Area-wise, it is equivalent to a BHAF.



Primary filter removed to expose the safety filter.



Safety filter removed. Here you can see the barrier that separates the incoming air from directly impinging on the primary filter, and instead causes it to swirl:



It's a bit easier to see if I poke my fingers in the inlet:



The boss in the center where the outlet is is where the filters seal. They are radial seal with soft urethane; the safety filter seals on the inside of the boss, while the primary filter seals on the outside. Because that is all one piece with the outlet there is no possibility of air leaks at any seams. This allows you to rotate the outlet so you can clock the filter minder port to any position you want, and there are no seals between the outlet and main housing to get compromised and leak by doing so.

Here's the primary and safety filter side by side.



The safety filter just fits inside the primary - no space is wasted. Despite the blue color, the safety filter is not nanofiber. It is some kind of foam from the looks of it. It's just designed to catch any crap that might be knocked loose during filter servicing or an improper primary filter install. The idea is that if air leaks past the primary, the safety will catch the big stuff, and the small stuff will spike your UOA and let you know there's a problem before any real damage is done to the engine. This of course assumes you actually do UOA's

Here's some side-by-sides of the 9" FPG Alexin and the "short" PSD10. Keep in mind a "long" PSD10 will be 3" longer than the one shown here.











This is the clamp band used to mount the Alexin. The teeth on the inside allow you to clock the housing, and hence the inlet, to pretty much any position. Because the vacuator has to point down, the access cover is likewise clockable, so no matter the orientation of the body the cover can be installed with the vacuator at the bottom. And, as I mentioned, the outlet tube is also clockable to put the filter minder port in any position. This makes the Alexin very flexible from a mounting point of view.





Speaking of the vacuator valve, this is what it looks like close-up:



The valve is made from very soft durometer rubber, and the way it works is that the pulsations in the intake tract make it rapidly open and close while the engine is running. When the pressure is slightly positive and it opens, any accumulated dust is blown out. When the pressure goes negative, the valve closes to prevent any air or water from leaking through and bypassing the centrifugal dust separators. Now, if you are operating someplace REALLY dusty, like an open pit mine, you can replace the vacuator valve with an exhaust-driven scavenge system that maintains constant negative pressure at the vacuator port and prevents the excessive dust from clogging the works.

Here's the inlet swirlers on the PSD. They spin the incoming air, flinging the dust outwards and into the open housing where it drops to the bottom where the vacuator is located. Clean air travels through a coaxial tube in the middle and into the filter compartment.



Here are the aforementioned tubes which feed the relatively clean air to the inlet face of the filter element:



Here's the outlet side of the PSD housing:



The primary element seals on the 1" wide step. The safety filter rests against the little tabs and seals against the inner part of the housing. The brass plug is plugging a 1/8"NPT port where you can install a filter minder or gauge.

(continued)
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post #7 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 08:43 AM Thread Starter
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This is what tou see when you remove the service cover from the PSD housing. The regular cellulose filters (which are actually a bit more efficient than the cellulose pleated filters: 99.95% for the PSD vs 99.90% for pleated elements) are white in color. This one is blue, signifying that it is a nanofiber 99.99% efficiency filter



To remove it, you rock it back toward the inlet side to break the seal and then pull it straight out. Then you can read the fine print:





A look at the inlet and outlet side shows how impressively dense this filter media is. There is a lot of surface area packed in there:





Here's a side-by-side of the Alexin filter elements and the PSD10 filter element:



It's amazing how much that relatively compact PSD element can flow, and how much dirt it can hold, for it's size.

One accessory every filter should have is a gauge that is not simply a go-no go, but actually tells you how much peak restriction you have at any given time. Typically, Donaldson recommends replacing the filter at 25" H2O restriction, but they have filter minders with other "no-go" ranges for certain purposes. I went ahead and stuck with a standard 25" unit.









As promised, I did some mock-ups. Now, keep in mind my truck is a square body Chevy, but it should stiff give you Dodge guys some idea of fitment issues. First, a pic of the sad AEM dryflow I am currently wheezing through:



In that pic it looks as big as a BHAF, but it's not. I'd guess it has maybe 1/2 the area of a BHAF. It has less overall surface, and the pleats aren't as deep as a BHAF. For all I know this is the reason my rebuilt WH1C has been barfing oil out of the compressor side since day 1.

When I bought the Alexin, it was intended to plumb the intake through the fender and into a snorkel. I had already planned to relocate the batteries out of the hot engine bay, so there would be plenty of room to service the filter. The only other mod required is deletion of the hood spring hinges and use of a prop rod instead. As you can see, it really does fit nice and would plumb right through the fender:







Plenty of clearance between the outlet and firewall for a 90° rubber elbow:





You can see the vacuator valve tube right next to the battery tray. A hole in the fender would be needed for the vacuator, but that way the dirt would dump outside of the engine bay:




By contrast, fitment of the PSD10 is... interesting. Here's one possibility:











This is about the only place I can mount it without relocating the battery, but it is fraught with problems. First of all, it is too close to the exhaust heat, so it would need heat shielding. Second, the pipe to tie it in to the inlet of the upcoming HE351VE will look like a contortionists nightmare. Then there is the obvious fact that a snorkel will be a no-go. I doubt a simple cold-air duct would be doable. It's obvious that the battery has to be moved, but that was the plan with the Alexin anyway.

(continued)

Last edited by MaxPF; 12-18-2019 at 01:55 PM.
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post #8 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
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Now, before I talk about my actual plan, here's some pics of me playing around. One thing I noted is that a horizontal PSD would have given me more flexibility in mounting locations:











There's no way i'm gonna pay full-boat for a horizontal PSD10, but if I were so inclined it would be a simple matter to convert my vertical unit to a horizontal. I would just need a a proper size hole saw, cut off the vacuator tube, relocate it to the side, and glue it with my trusty Norton super-death-grip adhesive. However, I don't have it in me to chop up a nice functional unit, and my eventual plan will require a vertical housing, so it saves me from going down that road.

Here's a mount that would work if I heat-shielded the housing... and I WASN'T going to be using an HE351VE:





Anyway, this is all moot. What I have in mind requires relocating the battery and some creative fender work, but it will give me the snorkel I want, easy access to the filter element, and probably enough room to mount my electric OBA on the passenger inner fender. Suffice it to say it's a good thing I got the short PSD10, because the long one wouldn't work for what I have in mind.

Finally, there is the repair issue. The reason I got this filter so ridiculously cheap is that it was damaged. A piece was broken out of the outlet tube, and there were a couple cracks. Fortunately, the housing is a fiber reinforced resin, so the broken edges are a nice texture for the super-death-grip Norton adhesive. Here's what I had to fix:



Even though it is fiber reinforced material, I still took the liberty of stop-drilling the cracks:





I had a buddy spread apart the largest crack as wide as I dared, then filled it with adhesive and let it go. After that, I filled the stop-drill holes, glued up the broken piece, and inserted it in it;s place. Because if the way it broke it was like a puzzle piece and both fit perfectly back in place and locked itself in place. Then I put some weight on it to keep it from shifting and now I am letting it cure overnight.





Tomorrow I will sand it smooth, fill any low spots,wash, rinse, repeat. If I don't feel 100% warm and fuzzy when all is said and done I will machine a thin stainless steel sleeve to lightly press on the inside and secure it with some more Norton sooper-spooge. Either way, it should be good as new and ready to feed air to the cast iron beast
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post #9 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 10:41 AM
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Looking nice MaxPF Im considering alternatives and look forward to see your results.
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post #10 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 12:41 PM
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The Alexin is a very popular filter in the ag and industrial market, My skid steer uses the 9" model for it's 4.2 liter engine, same filter is used on the next size larger turbo model. Filter elements are common and can be purchased at most automotive and ag stores in my area for around $45-50 for the outer filter. Because of the dusty environments ag equipment is operated in, most times the air filters are oversized to allow for some filter restriction, on a 5.9 in a pickup I'd remove the inner filter.
The filter element in the PSD looks very similar to ones used in Ford 6.0 PS trucks. What's the cost of replacement filters for that unit.

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post #11 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 05:46 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Looking nice MaxPF Im considering alternatives and look forward to see your results.
Are you looking for big flow or are you like me and looking for moderate flow with good dust handling capability?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroked 450 View Post
The Alexin is a very popular filter in the ag and industrial market, My skid steer uses the 9" model for it's 4.2 liter engine, same filter is used on the next size larger turbo model. Filter elements are common and can be purchased at most automotive and ag stores in my area for around $45-50 for the outer filter.
I really like the Alexin. It is a very intelligently designed "minimalist" housing for dusty environments and it's clockability of all three parts (main housing, discharge tube, cover) makes it very versatile. Most of all, I like how well it fits in my engine bay without hogging all the available space. Because of the inlet design designed to swirl the incoming air it is more restrictive than the BHAF despite equivalent filter area, but I personally believe that because of the dust separation of the Alexin, the BHAF will quickly become more restrictive than the Alexin in a dusty environment.

Quote:
Because of the dusty environments ag equipment is operated in, most times the air filters are oversized to allow for some filter restriction, on a 5.9 in a pickup I'd remove the inner filter.
I agree. In a pickup you won't be changing the filter in a dirty field environment, so the safety filter isn't really needed IMO.

Quote:
The filter element in the PSD looks very similar to ones used in Ford 6.0 PS trucks.
That's because it the 6.0 uses a Powercore filter, which is what the PSD uses The Donaldson part number for the Ford 6.0 filter is P603577. It is basically a Powercore element with it's own integral housing, making it more expensive and harder to change. Leave it to Ford to do that rather than simply use a Donaldson PCD housing. On the 6.4's they got smarter and used a PCD-style housing with a filter (P613522) that is like the PCD/PSD elements, but is unique size-wise (leave it to Ford to not use a standard already-in-production product ). At least Ford used good, high-flowing filters on those trucks. On the 6.7's, they went to a very restrictive flat panel filter (P621023). Ram, of course, also uses restrictive flat panels, as does Chevy/Duramax with one exception: for some reason, probably packaging, the Chevy Express vans with the Duramax uses a Donaldson Powercore element (P611720) although, as with the Ford, the size is unique to the Chevy application rather than being one of the standard Donaldson PSD/PCD sizes.

With the exception of space issues, I can't imagine why every manufacturer of diesel light trucks doesn't use powercore filters. The current engines make so much power, and use so much air, that they must be pulling some serious inlet vacuum even with a brand new filter. Part of it also might be cost, but anyone who can afford a $50k+ truck can't really complain about spending $50-$70 on an air filter.


Quote:
What's the cost of replacement filters for that unit.
I often shop at a place called Filter Products Corporation down in Tucson. They usually have pretty good prices, and since they are so close I get the parts the next day even with regular ground shipping. Anyway, the filter for the "short" PSD10 units (P608666) runs $59.19. Because that filter is also used in some military equipment (i.e. MRAP) it shows a NATO NSN number among the applications. I'm guessing they like the PSD units over in the sandbox where filters otherwise plug up on a nearly daily basis

FWIW, the filters for the 9" Alexin are $28.97. That is for a genuine Donaldson filter. The DBA5226, which is the Donaldson Blue nanofiber version of that same 9" filter, is $36.21. A complete G090225 9" Alexin filter housing assembly, which includes the primary and safety filter, is only $117.01.
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post #12 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 06:44 AM Thread Starter
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Here's the first stage of my repair handiwork:



It actually went much better than I thought. It us usable as-is right now, but I am going to trowel a bit of sooper-goo into the low spots the next time I have to glue some stuff on my AC box (the nozzles for the adhesive are expensive and waste quite a bit of material each time, so it's best to glue as much stuff as possible with each nozzle change). Then I will finish sand and Scotch-Brite it and call it good.

I also went ahead and bought a couple spare blue elements off of Ebay while they are available and cheap. They should last me for a decade or so I think the nanofiber elements were made for OEMs only in these particular sizes. Not that it is a big deal; unlike the pleated elements at 99.90% the regular Powercore element is rated 99.95% efficiency new, and it gets more efficient as it gets dirty, so it's likely most end users decided it wasn't worth spending the extra money for a couple tenths of a percent efficiency that doesn't actually improve UOA's or filter life. If it hadn't been for the fact the nanofiber elements on Ebay are cheaper than new standard elements from wholesalers I wouldn't of bought them and would've just got one spare standard element.

Hey D89? Did you get one of those .gov surplus MRAP units for yours?

Last edited by MaxPF; 12-18-2019 at 01:55 PM.
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